tails


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tail 1

 (tāl)
n.
1. The posterior part of an animal, especially when elongated and extending beyond the trunk or main part of the body.
2. The bottom, rear, or hindmost part, especially:
a. The lowest part of a garment such as a shirt or coat.
b. The rear end of an automobile or other vehicle.
c. The rear portion of the fuselage of an aircraft or the assembly of stabilizing planes and control surfaces in this portion.
d. The vaned rear portion of a bomb or missile.
3. A long thin arrangement, part, or structure, often extending from a main structure:
a. A long thin part on some kites that hangs down below the part that catches the wind to provide stability.
b. The long stream of gas and dust that is illuminated and directed away from the head of a comet when it is close to the sun.
c. A braid of hair; a pigtail.
d. A train of followers; a retinue.
4. Something that follows something else or takes the last place:
a. The end of a line of persons or things.
b. The short closing line of certain stanzas of verse.
c. The refuse or dross remaining from processes such as distilling or milling.
5. tails
a. A formal evening costume typically worn by men.
b. A tailcoat.
6. often tails(used with a sing. verb) The side of a coin not having the principal design.
7. The trail of a person or animal in flight: The police were on the bank robber's tail.
8. A person assigned or employed to follow and report on someone else's movements and actions: The police put a tail on the suspected drug dealer.
9.
a. Slang The buttocks.
b. Vulgar Slang Sexual intercourse.
c. Offensive Slang Women considered as sexual partners.
adj.
1. Of or relating to a tail or tails: tail feathers.
2. Situated in the tail, as of an airplane: a tail gunner.
v. tailed, tail·ing, tails
v.tr.
1. To provide with a tail: tail a kite.
2. To deprive of a tail; dock.
3. To serve as the tail or last part of: The Santa Claus float tailed the parade.
4. To connect (often dissimilar or incongruous objects) by the tail or end: tail two ideas together.
5. To set one end of (a beam, board, or brick) into a wall.
6. Informal To follow and keep (a person) under surveillance.
v.intr.
1. To become lengthened or spaced when moving in a line: The patrol tailed out in pairs.
2. To be inserted at one end into a wall, as a floor timber or beam.
3. Informal To follow: tailed after the leader.
4. Nautical
a. To go aground with the stern foremost.
b. To lie or swing with the stern in a named direction, as when riding at anchor or on a mooring.
5. Sports To veer from a straight course in the direction of the dominant hand of the player propelling the ball: a pitch that tails away from the batter.
Phrasal Verbs:
tail down
To ease a heavy load down a steep slope.
tail off (or away)
To diminish gradually; dwindle or subside: The fireworks tailed off into darkness.
Idiom:
with (one's) tail between (one's) legs
In a state of humiliation or dejection.

[Middle English, from Old English tægel.]

tail′less adj.

tail 2

 (tāl) Law
n.
Limitation of the inheritance of an estate to a particular person and that person's heirs.
adj.
Being in tail: a tail estate.

[Middle English taille, from Old French, division, from taillier, to cut; see tailor.]

tails

(teɪlz)
pl n
(Clothing & Fashion) an informal name for tail coat
interj, adv
with the reverse side of a coin uppermost: used as a call before tossing a coin. Compare heads

tails

(teɪlz)

adj., adv.
1. (of a coin) with the reverse facing up. Compare heads.
n.
[1675–85]

tails

  • comet - Has a tail, and gets its name from Greek kometes, "long-haired star."
  • bangs - The practice of cutting horses' tails the same length was called "banging off," which led to this term for a woman's hairstyle.
  • soup-and-fish - Refers to the attire of white tie and tails.
  • tailgate - Originally a gate that dropped down at the tail of a wagon.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tails - formalwear consisting of full evening dress for mentails - formalwear consisting of full evening dress for men
evening clothes, evening dress, eveningwear, formalwear - attire to wear on formal occasions in the evening
morning coat, swallowtail, swallow-tailed coat - a man's full-dress jacket with two long tapering tails at the back
Translations
na rubyorel
plat
írás!
bakhliî á peningibakhliî, krónuna!

tails

[teɪlz] n
a. sg (of coin) → testa
heads or tails → testa o croce
b. pl (Dress) → frac m inv, marsina

tail

(teil) noun
1. the part of an animal, bird or fish that sticks out behind the rest of its body. The dog wagged its tail; A fish swims by moving its tail.
2. anything which has a similar function or position. the tail of an aeroplane/comet.
verb
to follow closely. The detectives tailed the thief to the station.
-tailed
having a (certain size, type etc of) tail. a black-tailed duck; a long-tailed dog.
tails noun, adverb
(on) the side of a coin that does not have the head of the sovereign etc on it. He tossed the coin and it came down tails.
interjection
a call showing that a person has chosen that side of the coin when tossing a coin to make a decision etc.
ˌtail-ˈend noun
the very end or last part. the tail-end of the procession.
ˈtail-light noun
the (usually red) light on the back of a car, train etc. He followed the tail-lights of the bus.
tail wind
a wind coming from behind. We sailed home with a tail wind.
tail off
1. to become fewer, smaller or weaker (at the end). His interest tailed off towards the end of the film.
2. (also tail away) (of voices etc) to become quieter or silent. His voice tailed away into silence.
References in classic literature ?
And if turning up my hair makes me one, I'll wear it in two tails till I'm twenty," cried Jo, pulling off her net, and shaking down a chestnut mane.
As we approached, they barked, shook their tails at us, and scurried underground.
The cunning devils know half the trade already, for they beat the time with their tails, as you heard just now; and in good time it was, too, or 'killdeer' might have sounded the first note among them.
The space between the decks was small; and there, bolt-upright, sat old Bildad, who always sat so, and never leaned, and this to save his coat tails.
You who have tails just whisk the flies off without thinking about it, and you can't tell what a torment it is to have them settle upon you and sting and sting, and have nothing in the world to lash them off with.
They had curled-hair works for the cattle tails, and a "wool pullery" for the sheepskins; they made pepsin from the stomachs of the pigs, and albumen from the blood, and violin strings from the ill-smelling entrails.
Her woolly hair was braided in sundry little tails, which stuck out in every direction.
I know not how significant it is, or how far it is an evidence of singularity, that an individual should thus consent in his pettiest walk with the general movement of the race; but I know that something akin to the migratory instinct in birds and quadrupeds--which, in some instances, is known to have affected the squirrel tribe, impelling them to a general and mysterious movement, in which they were seen, say some, crossing the broadest rivers, each on its particular chip, with its tail raised for a sail, and bridging narrower streams with their dead--that something like the furor which affects the domestic cattle in the spring, and which is referred to a worm in their tails,--affects both nations and individuals, either perennially or from time to time.
There was about an average of two dogs to one man; and these sat in expectant attitudes till a spent bone was flung to them, and then they went for it by brigades and divisions, with a rush, and there ensued a fight which filled the prospect with a tumultu- ous chaos of plunging heads and bodies and flashing tails, and the storm of howlings and barkings deafened all speech for the time; but that was no matter, for the dog-fight was always a bigger interest anyway; the men rose, sometimes, to observe it the better and bet on it, and the ladies and the musicians stretched them- selves out over their balusters with the same object; and all broke into delighted ejaculations from time to time.
Now the thing for YOU to do is to droop your tails and go home and crawl in a hole.
One was for going one way, one another, so we throwed up, heads or tails, and the Upper Mississippi won.
She braided her hair in the two accustomed pig- tails, took off her best shoes (which had happily escaped notice), with all the while a fixed resolve growing in her mind, that of leaving the brick house and going back to the farm.