take part


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

part

 (pärt)
n.
1. A portion, division, piece, or segment of a whole.
2. Any of several equal portions or fractions that can constitute a whole or into which a whole can be divided: a mixture of two parts flour to one part sugar.
3. A division of a book or artistic work such as a film: a novel in three parts.
4.
a. An organ, member, or other division of an organism: A tail is not a part of a guinea pig.
b. parts The external genitals.
5. A component that can be separated from or attached to a system; a detachable piece: spare parts for cars.
6. often parts A region, area, land, or territory: "Minding your own business is second nature in these parts" (Boston).
7.
a. A role: He has the main part in the play.
b. One's responsibility, duty, or obligation; share: We each do our part to keep the house clean.
c. parts Abilities or talents: a person of many parts.
8. Music
a. The music or score for a particular instrument, as in an orchestra.
b. One of the melodic divisions or voices of a contrapuntal composition.
9. The line where the hair on the head is parted.
v. part·ed, part·ing, parts
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to move apart; put apart: parted the curtains.
b. To divide into two or more parts; split: The ship's prow parted the waves.
2. To break up the relationship or association of: A dispute over ownership parted the founders of the business. See Synonyms at separate.
3. To comb (hair, for example) away from a dividing line, as on the scalp.
4. To go away from; depart from: He parted this life for a better one.
5. Archaic To divide into shares or portions.
v.intr.
1.
a. To be divided or separated: The curtain parted in the middle.
b. To move apart: Her lips parted, and she spoke.
2.
a. To leave one another; take leave: They parted as friends.
b. To go away from another; depart: She parted from him at college graduation.
c. Archaic To die.
3. To separate or divide into ways going in different directions: The road parts about halfway into the forest.
4. To disagree or stop associating because of a disagreement: The committee parted over the issue of pay raises for employees.
adv.
Partially; in part: part yellow, part green.
adj.
Not full or complete; partial: a part owner of the business.
Phrasal Verb:
part with
1. To give up or let go of; relinquish: I would not part with that book.
2. To go away from (another): You should not part with him in anger.
Idioms:
for (one's) part
So far as one is concerned.
for the most part
To the greater extent; generally or mostly.
in good part
Good-naturedly or with good grace; without taking offense: take a joke in good part.
in part
To some extent; partly.
on the part of
Regarding or with respect to (the one specified): Brilliant strategy on the part of Confederate forces ensured their victory at Chancellorsville.
part and parcel
A basic or essential part: Working overtime is part and parcel of my job.
part company/ways
1. To leave one another's presence; go away or separate.
2. To disagree or stop associating because of a disagreement.
take part
To join in; participate: She took part in the celebration.
take (someone's) part
To side with in a disagreement; support.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin pars, part-; see perə- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.take part - share in something
act, move - perform an action, or work out or perform (an action); "think before you act"; "We must move quickly"; "The governor should act on the new energy bill"; "The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel"
partake in - be active in
References in classic literature ?
It was known as a fact that the Most Serene Don John of Austria, natural brother of our good king Don Philip, was coming as commander-in-chief of the allied forces, and rumours were abroad of the vast warlike preparations which were being made, all which stirred my heart and filled me with a longing to take part in the campaign which was expected; and though I had reason to believe, and almost certain promises, that on the first opportunity that presented itself I should be promoted to be captain, I preferred to leave all and betake myself, as I did, to Italy; and it was my good fortune that Don John had just arrived at Genoa, and was going on to Naples to join the Venetian fleet, as he afterwards did at Messina.
We would love as many families as possible to take part and help raise funds for the Sunshine Fund.
ALL TOGETHER NOW: A packed assembly hall at Dryclough CE (VC) Infants School as pupils take part in Sign2Sing (S)
The walk allowed entrants to take part in either a full or half marathon to raise funds for the fight against a cancer type of their choice.
He left for South Africa on Wednesday alongside other athletes, Lavinia Haitope, Iyambo Paulus, Simon Shipangana, Amutoko Anna to take part in the 10 km Capetown Marathon Race
This walking and running-based event is open to all staff working in both area commands who can take part either on their own, or as part of a team of five to help collectively complete the virtual Olympic torch route.