taken


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tak·en

 (tā′kən)
v.
Past participle of take.

taken

(ˈteɪkən)
vb
the past participle of take1
adj
(foll by: with) enthusiastically impressed (by); infatuated (with)

take

(teɪk)

v. took, tak•en, tak•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to get into one's hands or possession by voluntary action: Take the book, please.
2. to hold, grasp, or grip: to take a child by the hand.
3. to get into one's possession or control by force or artifice: took the bone from the snarling dog.
4. to seize or capture: to take a prisoner.
5. to catch or get (fish, game, etc.), esp. by killing.
6. to pick from a number; select.
7. to receive and accept willingly (something given or offered): to take a bribe.
8. to receive or be the recipient of: to take first prize.
9. to accept and act upon or comply with: Take my advice.
10. to receive or accept (a person) into some relation: to take someone in marriage.
11. to receive or react to in a specified manner: She took his death hard.
12. to receive as a payment or charge.
13. to get or obtain from a source; derive: The book takes its title from Dante.
14. to extract or quote.
15. to obtain or exact as compensation for a wrong: to take revenge.
16. to receive into the body, as by swallowing or inhaling: to take a pill; to take a deep breath.
17. to have for one's benefit or use: to take a nap; to take a bath.
18. to use as a flavoring agent: to take sugar in one's coffee.
19. to be subjected to; undergo: to take a rest cure.
20. to endure or submit to with equanimity or without weakening: unable to take punishment.
21. to enter into the enjoyment of: Let's take a vacation.
22. to carry off without permission; steal: to take someone's wallet.
23. to remove: to take a coat from the closet.
24. to remove by death: The flood took many victims.
25. to subtract or deduct: to take 2 from 5.
26. to carry with one: Are you taking an umbrella?
27. to convey or transport: We took them for a drive.
28. to serve as a means of conducting: These stairs take you to the attic.
29. to bring about a change in the condition of: Her talent took her to the top.
30. to escort or accompany.
31. to attempt or succeed in getting over, through, or around; clear; negotiate: The horse took the fence easily.
32. to come upon suddenly; catch: to take a thief by surprise.
33. to attack or affect with or as if with a disease: taken with a fit of laughter.
34. to be capable of attaining as a result of some action or treatment: This leather takes a high polish.
35. to absorb or become impregnated with; be susceptible to: The cloth will not take a dye.
36. to require: It takes courage to do that.
37. to employ for some purpose: to take measures to curb drugs.
38. to use as a means of transportation: to take the bus to work.
39. to proceed to occupy: Take a seat.
40. to fill (time, space, etc.); occupy: His hobby takes most of his spare time.
41. to use up; consume: It took ten minutes to solve the problem.
42. to avail oneself of: I took the opportunity to leave.
43. to do, perform, execute, etc.: to take a walk.
44. to go into or enter: Take the road to the left.
45. to adopt and enter upon (a way, course, etc.): to take the path of least resistance.
46. to act or perform: to take the part of the hero.
47. to make (a reproduction, picture, or photograph): to take home movies.
48. to make a picture, esp. a photograph, of: The photographer took us sitting down.
49. to write down: to take notes.
50. to apply oneself to; study: to take a history course.
51. to deal with; treat: to take a matter under consideration.
52. to assume or undertake (a function, duty, etc.): The mayor took office last month.
53. to assume or adopt (a symbol, badge, etc.) as a token of office: to take the veil.
54. to assume the obligation of; be bound by: to take an oath.
55. to assume or adopt as one's own: to take someone's side in an argument.
56. to accept the burden of: to take the blame.
57. to determine by inquiry, examination, measurement, etc.: to take someone's pulse; to take a census.
58. to have or experience (a feeling or state of mind): to take pride in one's appearance.
59. to form and hold in the mind: to take a gloomy view.
60. to grasp or apprehend mentally; understand: Do you take my meaning?
61. to understand in a specified way: Don't take the remark as an insult.
62. to accept the statements of: She took him at his word.
63. to assume as a fact: I take it that you won't be there.
64. to regard or consider: They were taken to be wealthy.
65. to consider as an example: Take the French Revolution.
66. to capture or win (a piece, trick, etc.) in a game.
67. Informal. to cheat, swindle, or victimize: The museum got taken on that painting.
68. to win or obtain money from: He took me for $10 in the poker game.
69. to have sexual intercourse with.
70. to be used with (a certain grammatical form, accent, case, etc.): a verb that takes an object.
71. Law. to acquire (property), as on the happening of a particular event.
72. (of a baseball batter) to allow (a pitch) to go by without swinging at it.
v.i.
73. to catch or engage, as a mechanical device.
74. to strike root or begin to grow, as a plant.
75. to adhere, as ink, dye, or color.
76. to win favor or acceptance.
77. to have the intended result or effect: The vaccination took.
78. to enter into possession, as of an estate.
79. to detract (usu. fol. by from).
80. to make one's way; proceed; go: to take across the meadow.
81. to fall or become: to take sick.
82. to admit of being photographed in a particular manner.
83. take after,
a. to resemble (another person, as a parent).
b. to follow or chase.
84. take apart,
a. to disassemble: to take a clock apart.
b. to criticize severely; attack.
c. to examine or analyze closely; dissect.
85. take back,
a. to regain possession of.
b. to return, as for exchange.
c. to allow to return; resume a relationship with.
d. to cause to remember: It takes me back to the old days.
e. to retract: to take back a statement.
86. take down,
a. to write down; record.
b. to reduce the pride or arrogance of; humble: to take someone down a peg.
87. take in,
a. to alter (a garment) so as to make smaller or tighter.
b. to provide lodging for.
c. to include; encompass.
d. to grasp the meaning of; comprehend.
e. to deceive; trick; cheat.
f. to observe; notice.
g. to visit or attend: to take in a show.
h. to furl (a sail).
i. to receive as proceeds, as from business activity.
88. take off,
a. to remove: Take off your coat.
b. to lead away.
c. to leave the ground, as an airplane.
d. to depart; leave.
e. to move onward or forward with a burst of speed.
f. to withdraw or remove from: She was taken off the night shift.
g. to subtract, as a discount; deduct: The store took off 20 percent.
h. to imitate; mimic; burlesque.
i. to achieve sudden, marked growth, success, etc.: Sales took off just before Christmas.
89. take on,
a. to hire; employ.
b. to undertake; assume.
c. to acquire.
d. to accept as a challenge or opponent.
e. Informal. to show great emotion; become excited.
90. take out,
a. to withdraw; remove.
b. to deduct.
c. to procure by application: to take out insurance.
d. to carry out for use or consumption elsewhere.
e. to escort, as on a date.
f. to set out; start.
g. Slang. to kill or destroy.
91. take over, to assume management or possession of or responsibility for.
92. take up,
a. to occupy oneself with the study or practice of.
b. to lift or pick up.
c. to fill, occupy, or consume (space, time, etc.).
d. to begin to advocate or support; sponsor.
e. to continue; resume.
f. to raise for discussion or consideration.
g. to undertake; assume.
h. to absorb (a liquid).
i. to make shorter, as by hemming.
j. to make tighter, as by winding in.
k. to deal with.
l. to adopt seriously: to take up an idea.
m. to accept, as an offer or challenge.
93. take up with, to become friendly with; keep company with.
n.
94. the act of taking.
95. something that is taken.
96. the quantity of fish, game, etc., taken at one time.
97. Informal. money taken in, esp. profits.
98.
a. a scene in a movie or television program photographed without interruption.
b. an instance of such continuous operation of a film camera.
99. Informal. a visual and mental response: She did a slow take.
100. a recording of a musical performance.
101. a successful inoculation.
102.
a. an opinion or assessment: What's your take on the candidate?
b. an approach; treatment: a new take on an old idea.
Idioms:
1. on the take, Slang.
a. accepting bribes.
b. in search of personal profit at the expense of others.
2. take five, ten, etc., Informal. to rest briefly, esp. for the approximate time specified.
3. take for,
a. to assume to be: I took it for a fact.
b. to assume falsely to be; mistake for: to be taken for a foreigner.
4. take it,
a. to believe, assume, or accept something: Take it from me.
b. to be able to resist or endure hardship, abuse, etc.
5. take it out on, to cause (another) to suffer for one's own misfortune, frustration, anger, etc.
6. take place, to happen; occur.
7. take to,
a. to devote or apply oneself to: to take to drink.
b. to respond favorably to: They took to each other at once.
c. to go to: to take to one's bed.
d. to have recourse to; resort to.
8. take upon oneself, to assume as a responsibility or obligation.
[before 1100; Middle English; late Old English tacan to grasp, touch < Old Norse taka, c. Middle Dutch taken to grasp]
tak′er, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.taken - understood in a certain way; made sense of; "a word taken literally"; "a smile taken as consent"; "an open door interpreted as an invitation"
understood - fully apprehended as to purport or meaning or explanation; "the understood conditions of troop withdrawal were clear"
2.taken - be affected with an indisposition; "the child was taken ill"; "couldn't tell when he would be taken drunk"
affected - acted upon; influenced

taken

adjective charmed, pleased, delighted, fascinated, entertained, attracted to, enchanted, captivated, beguiled, bewitched I was much taken with their new TV ad.
Translations
pihkavarattu

taken

[ˈteɪkən]
pp of take
adj
to be taken with sb/sth (= like)
I was quite taken with her → Elle m'a assez plu.
I was quite taken with it → Cela m'a assez plu.
She seems very taken with the idea → L'idée semblait lui plaire beaucoup.
(= occupied) to be taken [seat, room] → être pris(e)

taken

ptp of take
adj to be taken with somebody/something (= attracted by)von jdm/etw angetan sein; she wasn’t very taken with him/itsie war nicht sehr von ihm/davon angetan
References in classic literature ?
Some time after my arrival in Flanders news came of the league that his Holiness Pope Pius V of happy memory, had made with Venice and Spain against the common enemy, the Turk, who had just then with his fleet taken the famous island of Cyprus, which belonged to the Venetians, a loss deplorable and disastrous.
And how wicked of the child to deny having taken it, when anybody could see she must have
68: According to Arctinus, one Palladium was given to Dardanus by Zeus, and this was in Ilium until the city was taken.
But advancing forward towards my master (as I shall henceforth call him,) his youngest son, who sat next to him, an arch boy of about ten years old, took me up by the legs, and held me so high in the air, that I trembled every limb: but his father snatched me from him, and at the same time gave him such a box on the left ear, as would have felled an European troop of horse to the earth, ordering him to be taken from the table.
But let us say no more about him, and leave him to be taken, or else to escape if the son of Saturn holds his hand over him to protect him.
She received me very civilly, and with her usual obliging manner told me she would not have the less respect for me for my being reduced; that she had taken care my boy was very well looked after, though I could not pay for him, and that the woman that had him was easy, so that I needed not to trouble myself about him till I might be better able to do it effectually.
Little notice was taken of her stories, but they found a market, and encouraged by this fact, she resolved to make a bold stroke for fame and fortune.
But perhaps his illness has only just taken a favourable turn, and it's too late for him to come out, for it's very damp and there's a heavy dew.
Lavrushka, understanding that this was done to perplex him and that Napoleon expected him to be frightened, to gratify his new masters promptly pretended to be astonished and awe-struck, opened his eyes wide, and assumed the expression he usually put on when taken to be whipped.
Catching the sound of footsteps coming from the other side of the entry towards the staircase, the head waiter turned round, and seeing the Russian count, who had taken their best rooms, he took his hands out of his pockets deferentially, and with a bow informed him that a courier had been, and that the business about the palazzo had been arranged.
Notwithstanding the lassitude and fatigue which oppressed him now, in common with his two companions, and indeed with all who had taken an active share in that night's work, Hugh's boisterous merriment broke out afresh whenever he looked at Simon Tappertit, and vented itself--much to that gentleman's indignation--in such shouts of laughter as bade fair to bring the watch upon them, and involve them in a skirmish, to which in their present worn-out condition they might prove by no means equal.
As my new patron, or master, had taken me home to his house, so I was in hopes that he would take me with him when he went to sea again, believing that it would some time or other be his fate to be taken by a Spanish or Portugal man-of-war; and that then I should be set at liberty.