taker


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tak·er

 (tā′kər)
n.
One that takes or takes up something, such as a wager or purchase: There were no takers on the bets.

taker

(ˈteɪkə)
n
a person who takes something, esp a bet, wager, or offer of purchase
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.taker - one who accepts an offer
customer, client - someone who pays for goods or services
2.taker - one who takes a bet or wager
bettor, wagerer, better, punter - someone who bets
Translations
مَن يأخُذ
zákazník
aftager
kaupandi
alıcıbahse giren kimse

taker

[ˈteɪkəʳ] N at £5 there were no takersa un precio de 5 libras nadie se ofreció a comprarlo
the challenge found no takersno hubo nadie que quisiera aceptar el desafío

taker

[ˈteɪkər] npreneur m
Over 100 buyers or investors were approached, but there were no takers → Plus de cents acheteurs ont été approchés, mais il n'y a pas eu preneur.
to fail to find any takers, not to find any takers → ne pas trouver preneur

taker

n (Betting) → Wettende(r) mf; (at auction, fig) → Interessent(in) m(f); any takers?wer wettet?; (at auction) → wer bietet?; (fig)wer ist daran interessiert?; there were no takers (Betting) → niemand wettete, niemand schloss eine Wette ab; (at auction) → es wurden keine Angebote gemacht, niemand bot; (fig)niemand war daran interessiert

taker

[ˈteɪkəʳ] n drug-takersdrogati mpl
at £100 he found few takers → per 100 sterline ha trovato pochi acquirenti
his suggestion found no takers → la sua proposta non è stata accolta

take

(teik) verbpast tense took (tuk) : past participle taken
1. (often with down, ~out etc) to reach out for and grasp, hold, lift, pull etc. He took my hand; He took the book down from the shelf; He opened the drawer and took out a gun; I've had a tooth taken out.
2. (often with away, ~in, ~off, ~out etc) to carry, conduct or lead to another place. I took the books (back) to the library; He's taking me with him; Take her into my office; The police took him away; I took the dog out for a walk; He took her out for dinner.
3. to do or perform some action. I think I'll take a walk; Will you take a look?; to take a bath
4. to get, receive, buy, rent etc. I'm taking French lessons; I'll take three kilos of strawberries; We took a house in London.
5. (sometimes with back) to agree to have; to accept; He took my advice ; They refused to take responsibility ; I won't take that (insult) from you! ; I'm afraid we can't take back goods bought in a sale .
6. to need or require. How long does it take you to go home?; It takes time to do a difficult job like this.
7. to travel by (bus etc). I'm taking the next train to London; I took a taxi.
8. to have enough space for. The car takes five people.
9. to make a note, record etc. He took a photograph of the castle; The nurse took the patient's temperature.
10. to remove, use, occupy etc with or without permission. Someone's taken my coat; He took all my money.
11. to consider (as an example). Take John for example.
12. to capture or win. He took the first prize.
13. (often with away, ~from, ~off) to make less or smaller by a certain amount. Take (away) four from ten, and that leaves six.
14. to suppose or think (that something is the case). Do you take me for an idiot?
15. to eat or drink. Take these pills.
16. to conduct, lead or run; to be in charge or control of. Will you take the class/lecture/meeting this evening?
17. to consider or react or behave to (something) in a certain way. He took the news calmly.
18. to feel. He took pleasure/pride / a delight / an interest in his work.
19. to go down or go into (a road). Take the second road on the left.
noun
1. the amount of money taken in a shop etc; takings. What was the take today?
2. the filming of a single scene in a cinema film. After five takes, the director was satisfied.
taker noun
a person who takes (something) especially one who accepts an offer or takes a bet. I offered my friends my car, but there were no takers.
takings noun plural
the amount of money taken at a concert, in a shop etc. the day's takings.
ˈtake-away noun
(American ˈcarry-out or ˈtake-out).
1. food prepared and bought in a restaurant but taken away and eaten somewhere else eg at home. I'll go and buy a take-away; (also adjective) a take-away meal.
2. a restaurant where such food is prepared and bought.
be taken up with
to be busy or occupied with. He's very taken up with his new job.
be taken with/by
to find pleasing or attractive. He was very taken with the village.
take after
to be like (someone, especially a parent or relation) in appearance or character. She takes after her father.
take back
1. to make (someone) remember or think about (something). Meeting my old friends took me back to my childhood.
2. to admit that what one has said is not true. Take back what you said about my sister!
take down
to make a note or record of. He took down her name and address.
take an examination/test
to have one's knowledge or ability tested formally, often in writing.
take (someone) for
to believe (mistakenly) that (someone) is (someone or something else). I took you for your brother.
take in
1. to include. Literature takes in drama, poetry and the novel.
2. to give (someone) shelter. He had nowhere to go, so I took him in.
3. to understand and remember. I didn't take in what he said.
4. to make (clothes) smaller. I lost a lot of weight, so I had to take all my clothes in.
5. to deceive or cheat. He took me in with his story.
take it from me (that)
you can believe me when I say (that). Take it from me – it's true.
take it into one's head (to)
to decide (to). She took it into her head to go to Spain.
take off
1. to remove (clothes etc). He took off his coat.
2. (of an aircraft) to leave the ground. The plane took off for Rome (noun ˈtake-off).
3. not to work during (a period of time). I'm taking tomorrow morning off.
4. to imitate someone (often unkindly). He used to take off his teacher to make his friends laugh (noun ˈtake-off).
take on
1. to agree to do (work etc); to undertake. He took on the job.
2. to employ. They are taking on five hundred more men at the factory.
3. (with at) to challenge (someone) to a game etc. I'll take you on at tennis.
4. to get; to assume. His writing took on a completely new meaning.
5. to allow (passengers) to get on or in. The bus only stops here to take on passengers.
6. to be upset. Don't take on so!
take it out on
to be angry with or unpleasant to because one is angry, disappointed etc oneself. You're upset, but there's no need to take it out on me!
take over
1. to take control (of). He has taken the business over (noun ˈtake-over).
2. (often with from) to do (something) after someone else stops doing it. He retired last year, and I took over (his job) from him.
ˈtake to
1. to find acceptable or pleasing. I soon took to her children/idea.
2. to begin to do (something) regularly. He took to smoking a pipe.
take up
1. to use or occupy (space, time etc). I won't take up much of your time.
2. to begin doing, playing etc. He has taken up the violin/teaching.
3. to shorten (clothes). My skirts were too long, so I had them taken up.
4. to lift or raise; to pick up. He took up the book.
take (something) upon oneself
to take responsibility for. I took it upon myself to make sure she arrived safely.
take (something) up with (someone)
to discuss (especially a complaint). Take the matter up with your MP.

see also bring.
References in classic literature ?
All day long this man would toil thus, his whole being centered upon the purpose of making twenty-three instead of twenty-two and a half cents an hour; and then his product would be reckoned up by the census taker, and jubilant captains of industry would boast of it in their banquet halls, telling how our workers are nearly twice as efficient as those of any other country.
The neighbors said it was the doctor first, then Emmeline, then the undertaker -- the under- taker never got in ahead of Emmeline but once, and then she hung fire on a rhyme for the dead person's name, which was Whistler.
If you will interpret the word INTOLERANCE as FIRMNESS OF PRINCIPLE, if you do not wish to condemn in the catholic soul of the Abbe de Sponde the stoicism which Walter Scott has made you admire in the puritan soul of Jeanie Deans' father; if you are willing to recognize in the Roman Church the Potius mori quam foedari that you admire in republican tenets,--you will understand the sorrow of the Abbe de Sponde when he saw in his niece's salon the apostate priest, the renegade, the pervert, the heretic, that enemy of the Church, the guilty taker of the Constitutional oath.
THE NOTE TAKER [coming forward on her right, the rest crowding after him] There, there, there, there
THE NOTE TAKER [with quick interest] What's a copper's nark?
THE NOTE TAKER [overbearing but good-humored] Oh, shut up, shut up.
The bribe taker naturally inferred that Werper had slain his fellow and dared not admit that he had permitted him to enter the hut, fearing as he did, the anger of Achmet Zek.
It wanteth love, it wanteth hate, it is over-rich, it bestoweth, it throweth away, it beggeth for some one to take from it, it thanketh the taker, it would fain be hated,--
The poor soul quickens her pace; is swift, and close upon him entering under the gateway; but only sees a postern staircase on one side of it, and on the other side an ancient vaulted room, in which a large-headed, gray-haired gentleman is writing, under the odd circumstances of sitting open to the thoroughfare and eyeing all who pass, as if he were toll- taker of the gateway: though the way is free.
The demeanour of that gentleman at first suggested to her mind that he might be a taker of likenesses, so intently did he look at her, and so frequently did he glance at the little note-book by his side.
A speculator among the crowd offered six to one on Galahad, but found no takers.
That it isn't worth so much; because he can find no takers.