taking


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tak·ing

 (tā′kĭng)
adj.
1. Capturing interest; fetching: a taking smile.
2. Contagious; catching. Used of an infectious disease.
n.
1. The act of one that takes.
2. Something taken, as a catch of fish.
3. Law An action by a government, especially under the power of eminent domain, that deprives a private owner of real property or of the use and enjoyment of that property.
4. takings Informal Receipts, especially of money.

taking

(ˈteɪkɪŋ)
adj
1. charming, fascinating, or intriguing
2. informal infectious; catching
n
3. something taken
4. (Commerce) (plural) receipts; the income earned, taken, or received by a shop, business, etc
ˈtakingly adv
ˈtakingness n

tak•ing

(ˈteɪ kɪŋ)

n.
1. the act of a person or thing that takes.
2. an action by the federal government, as a regulatory ruling, that imposes a restriction on the use of private property for which the owner must be compensated.
3. takings, money earned or gained.
adj.
4. captivating; pleasing: taking ways.
[1300–50]
tak′ing•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.taking - the act of someone who picks up or takes something; "the pickings were easy"; "clothing could be had for the taking"
action - something done (usually as opposed to something said); "there were stories of murders and other unnatural actions"
Adj.1.taking - very attractive; capturing interest; "a fetching new hairstyle"; "something inexpressibly taking in his manner"; "a winning personality"
attractive - pleasing to the eye or mind especially through beauty or charm; "a remarkably attractive young man"; "an attractive personality"; "attractive clothes"; "a book with attractive illustrations"

taking

adjective
Translations

taking

[ˈteɪkɪŋ]
A. ADJ (= attractive) → atractivo
B. N (Mil) [of town] → toma f, conquista f; [of hostages] → toma f
the job's yours for the takingel trabajo es tuyo si lo quieres
the match was theirs for the takingtenían el partido prácticamente ganado

taking

n
it’s yours for the takingdas können Sie (umsonst) haben
takings pl (Comm) → Einnahmen pl
(Mil, of town) → Einnahme f, → Eroberung f
(old: = distress) → Aufregung f, → Erregung f; to be in a takingaufgeregt or erregt sein
adj manners, wayseinnehmend, gewinnend; personsympathisch, anziehend

taking

:
taking away
nWegnahme f
taking over
nÜbernahme f

taking

[ˈteɪkɪŋ] adj (attractive) → accattivante
References in classic literature ?
stead of taking to the woods when I run off, I'd go down the river about fifty mile and camp in one place for good, and not have such a rough time tramping on foot.
But I wish each of you on taking possession of the share that falls to him to follow one of the paths I shall indicate.
At this the Greeks are so enraged that they determine to stone Aias, who only escapes from the danger threatening him by taking refuge at the altar of Athena.
He then sent his servants to their work, and taking his handkerchief out of his pocket, he doubled and spread it on his left hand, which he placed flat on the ground with the palm upward, making me a sign to step into it, as I could easily do, for it was not above a foot in thickness.
The swineherd then mixed wine in a bowl of ivy-wood, and taking a seat opposite Ulysses told him to begin.
How they came to get so many I could not tell; but as I had only robbed the thief, I made no scruple at taking these goods, and being very glad of them too.
Beyond sat a pair of humble lovers, artlessly holding each other by the hand, a somber spinster eating peppermints out of a paper bag, and an old gentleman taking his preparatory nap behind a yellow bandanna.
Taking their way along it for a short distance, they came to a lane, so shaded by the trees on either hand that they met together over-head, and arched the narrow way.
Well, one Sunday morning I was sitting out here in front of my cabin, with my cat, taking the sun, and looking at the blue hills, and listening to the leaves rustling so lonely in the trees, and thinking of the home away yonder in the states, that I hadn't heard from in thirteen years, when a bluejay lit on that house, with an acorn in his mouth, and says,
While this was taking place in Petersburg the French had already passed Smolensk and were drawing nearer and nearer to Moscow.
This captain taking a fancy to my conversation, which was not at all disagreeable at that time, hearing me say I had a mind to see the world, told me if I would go the voyage with him I should be at no expense; I should be his messmate and his companion; and if I could carry anything with me, I should have all the advantage of it that the trade would admit; and perhaps I might meet with some encouragement.
At the same time I will send Iris to great Priam to bid him go to the ships of the Achaeans, and ransom his son, taking with him such gifts for Achilles as may give him satisfaction.