taking


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Related to taking: Taking Care of Business, taking shape, taking place

tak·ing

 (tā′kĭng)
adj.
1. Capturing interest; fetching: a taking smile.
2. Contagious; catching. Used of an infectious disease.
n.
1. The act of one that takes.
2. Something taken, as a catch of fish.
3. Law An action by a government, especially under the power of eminent domain, that deprives a private owner of real property or of the use and enjoyment of that property.
4. takings Informal Receipts, especially of money.

taking

(ˈteɪkɪŋ)
adj
1. charming, fascinating, or intriguing
2. informal infectious; catching
n
3. something taken
4. (Commerce) (plural) receipts; the income earned, taken, or received by a shop, business, etc
ˈtakingly adv
ˈtakingness n

tak•ing

(ˈteɪ kɪŋ)

n.
1. the act of a person or thing that takes.
2. an action by the federal government, as a regulatory ruling, that imposes a restriction on the use of private property for which the owner must be compensated.
3. takings, money earned or gained.
adj.
4. captivating; pleasing: taking ways.
[1300–50]
tak′ing•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.taking - the act of someone who picks up or takes something; "the pickings were easy"; "clothing could be had for the taking"
action - something done (usually as opposed to something said); "there were stories of murders and other unnatural actions"
Adj.1.taking - very attractive; capturing interest; "a fetching new hairstyle"; "something inexpressibly taking in his manner"; "a winning personality"
attractive - pleasing to the eye or mind especially through beauty or charm; "a remarkably attractive young man"; "an attractive personality"; "attractive clothes"; "a book with attractive illustrations"

taking

adjective
Translations

taking

[ˈteɪkɪŋ]
A. ADJ (= attractive) → atractivo
B. N (Mil) [of town] → toma f, conquista f; [of hostages] → toma f
the job's yours for the takingel trabajo es tuyo si lo quieres
the match was theirs for the takingtenían el partido prácticamente ganado

taking

n
it’s yours for the takingdas können Sie (umsonst) haben
takings pl (Comm) → Einnahmen pl
(Mil, of town) → Einnahme f, → Eroberung f
(old: = distress) → Aufregung f, → Erregung f; to be in a takingaufgeregt or erregt sein
adj manners, wayseinnehmend, gewinnend; personsympathisch, anziehend

taking

:
taking away
nWegnahme f
taking over
nÜbernahme f

taking

[ˈteɪkɪŋ] adj (attractive) → accattivante
References in classic literature ?
Swift was now rather old and feeble, taking only a nominal part in the activities of the firm made up of himself and his son.
Jerry touched his hat in return, gave the basin to Dolly, and was taking off my cloth, when the gentleman, hastening up, cried out, "No, no, finish your soup, my friend; I have not much time to spare, but I can wait till you have done, and set your little girl safe on the pavement.
Well, one Sunday morning I was sitting out here in front of my cabin, with my cat, taking the sun, and looking at the blue hills, and listening to the leaves rustling so lonely in the trees, and thinking of the home away yonder in the states, that I hadn't heard from in thirteen years, when a bluejay lit on that house, with an acorn in his mouth, and says,
stead of taking to the woods when I run off, I'd go down the river about fifty mile and camp in one place for good, and not have such a rough time tramping on foot.
Theer's one thing furder, Mas'r Davy,' said he, putting his hand in his breast-pocket, and gravely taking out the little paper bundle I had seen before, which he unrolled on the table.
Also, they stood about the door of the Jolly Bargemen, with knowing and reserved looks that filled the whole neighbourhood with admiration; and they had a mysterious manner of taking their drink, that was almost as good as taking the culprit.
The Squire had delivered this speech in a coughing and interrupted manner, but with no pause long enough for Godfrey to make it a pretext for taking up the word again.
He then sent his servants to their work, and taking his handkerchief out of his pocket, he doubled and spread it on his left hand, which he placed flat on the ground with the palm upward, making me a sign to step into it, as I could easily do, for it was not above a foot in thickness.
Taking each by an arm, he put them out of the anteroom, and shut the door.
You shall be soon satisfied," said the licentiate; "you must know, then, that though just now I said I was a licentiate, I am only a bachelor, and my name is Alonzo Lopez; I am a native of Alcobendas, I come from the city of Baeza with eleven others, priests, the same who fled with the torches, and we are going to the city of Segovia accompanying a dead body which is in that litter, and is that of a gentleman who died in Baeza, where he was interred; and now, as I said, we are taking his bones to their burial-place, which is in Segovia, where he was born.
Aramis pushed his so vigorously that after going back fifty paces, the man ended by fairly taking to his heels, and disappeared amid the hooting of the lackeys.
As soon as he had done so he shouted, and cried 'Shoo, shoo,' after his sheep to drive them on to the mountain; so I was left to scheme some way of taking my revenge and covering myself with glory.