takings


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

tak·ing

 (tā′kĭng)
adj.
1. Capturing interest; fetching: a taking smile.
2. Contagious; catching. Used of an infectious disease.
n.
1. The act of one that takes.
2. Something taken, as a catch of fish.
3. Law An action by a government, especially under the power of eminent domain, that deprives a private owner of real property or of the use and enjoyment of that property.
4. takings Informal Receipts, especially of money.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.takings - the income or profit arising from such transactions as the sale of land or other property; "the average return was about 5%"
income - the financial gain (earned or unearned) accruing over a given period of time
economic rent, rent - the return derived from cultivated land in excess of that derived from the poorest land cultivated under similar conditions
payback - financial return or reward (especially returns equal to the initial investment)
Translations
إِيْراداتإيرادات المَتْجَر
tržba
bruttoindtægtindtægt
tulot
utržak
tekjur, inntekt
収入
소득
intäkter
รายได้
tiền bán hàng

takings

[ˈteɪkɪŋz] (Brit) NPL (Comm) → recaudación fsing; (at show) → taquilla fsing, entrada fsing
this year's takings were only half last year'sla recaudación de este año ha sido sólo la mitad que la del año pasado

takings

[ˈteɪkɪŋz] npl (= receipts) → recette f

takings

[ˈteɪkɪŋz] npl (Fin) → introiti mpl, entrate fpl; (at show) → incasso

take

(teik) verbpast tense took (tuk) : past participle taken
1. (often with down, ~out etc) to reach out for and grasp, hold, lift, pull etc. He took my hand; He took the book down from the shelf; He opened the drawer and took out a gun; I've had a tooth taken out.
2. (often with away, ~in, ~off, ~out etc) to carry, conduct or lead to another place. I took the books (back) to the library; He's taking me with him; Take her into my office; The police took him away; I took the dog out for a walk; He took her out for dinner.
3. to do or perform some action. I think I'll take a walk; Will you take a look?; to take a bath
4. to get, receive, buy, rent etc. I'm taking French lessons; I'll take three kilos of strawberries; We took a house in London.
5. (sometimes with back) to agree to have; to accept; He took my advice ; They refused to take responsibility ; I won't take that (insult) from you! ; I'm afraid we can't take back goods bought in a sale .
6. to need or require. How long does it take you to go home?; It takes time to do a difficult job like this.
7. to travel by (bus etc). I'm taking the next train to London; I took a taxi.
8. to have enough space for. The car takes five people.
9. to make a note, record etc. He took a photograph of the castle; The nurse took the patient's temperature.
10. to remove, use, occupy etc with or without permission. Someone's taken my coat; He took all my money.
11. to consider (as an example). Take John for example.
12. to capture or win. He took the first prize.
13. (often with away, ~from, ~off) to make less or smaller by a certain amount. Take (away) four from ten, and that leaves six.
14. to suppose or think (that something is the case). Do you take me for an idiot?
15. to eat or drink. Take these pills.
16. to conduct, lead or run; to be in charge or control of. Will you take the class/lecture/meeting this evening?
17. to consider or react or behave to (something) in a certain way. He took the news calmly.
18. to feel. He took pleasure/pride / a delight / an interest in his work.
19. to go down or go into (a road). Take the second road on the left.
noun
1. the amount of money taken in a shop etc; takings. What was the take today?
2. the filming of a single scene in a cinema film. After five takes, the director was satisfied.
taker noun
a person who takes (something) especially one who accepts an offer or takes a bet. I offered my friends my car, but there were no takers.
takings noun plural
the amount of money taken at a concert, in a shop etc. the day's takings.
ˈtake-away noun
(American ˈcarry-out or ˈtake-out).
1. food prepared and bought in a restaurant but taken away and eaten somewhere else eg at home. I'll go and buy a take-away; (also adjective) a take-away meal.
2. a restaurant where such food is prepared and bought.
be taken up with
to be busy or occupied with. He's very taken up with his new job.
be taken with/by
to find pleasing or attractive. He was very taken with the village.
take after
to be like (someone, especially a parent or relation) in appearance or character. She takes after her father.
take back
1. to make (someone) remember or think about (something). Meeting my old friends took me back to my childhood.
2. to admit that what one has said is not true. Take back what you said about my sister!
take down
to make a note or record of. He took down her name and address.
take an examination/test
to have one's knowledge or ability tested formally, often in writing.
take (someone) for
to believe (mistakenly) that (someone) is (someone or something else). I took you for your brother.
take in
1. to include. Literature takes in drama, poetry and the novel.
2. to give (someone) shelter. He had nowhere to go, so I took him in.
3. to understand and remember. I didn't take in what he said.
4. to make (clothes) smaller. I lost a lot of weight, so I had to take all my clothes in.
5. to deceive or cheat. He took me in with his story.
take it from me (that)
you can believe me when I say (that). Take it from me – it's true.
take it into one's head (to)
to decide (to). She took it into her head to go to Spain.
take off
1. to remove (clothes etc). He took off his coat.
2. (of an aircraft) to leave the ground. The plane took off for Rome (noun ˈtake-off).
3. not to work during (a period of time). I'm taking tomorrow morning off.
4. to imitate someone (often unkindly). He used to take off his teacher to make his friends laugh (noun ˈtake-off).
take on
1. to agree to do (work etc); to undertake. He took on the job.
2. to employ. They are taking on five hundred more men at the factory.
3. (with at) to challenge (someone) to a game etc. I'll take you on at tennis.
4. to get; to assume. His writing took on a completely new meaning.
5. to allow (passengers) to get on or in. The bus only stops here to take on passengers.
6. to be upset. Don't take on so!
take it out on
to be angry with or unpleasant to because one is angry, disappointed etc oneself. You're upset, but there's no need to take it out on me!
take over
1. to take control (of). He has taken the business over (noun ˈtake-over).
2. (often with from) to do (something) after someone else stops doing it. He retired last year, and I took over (his job) from him.
ˈtake to
1. to find acceptable or pleasing. I soon took to her children/idea.
2. to begin to do (something) regularly. He took to smoking a pipe.
take up
1. to use or occupy (space, time etc). I won't take up much of your time.
2. to begin doing, playing etc. He has taken up the violin/teaching.
3. to shorten (clothes). My skirts were too long, so I had them taken up.
4. to lift or raise; to pick up. He took up the book.
take (something) upon oneself
to take responsibility for. I took it upon myself to make sure she arrived safely.
take (something) up with (someone)
to discuss (especially a complaint). Take the matter up with your MP.

see also bring.

takings

إِيْرادات tržba bruttoindtægt Einnahmen εισοδήματα recaudación tulot recettes utržak incassi 収入 소득 verdiensten fangst dochód ganhos выручка intäkter รายได้ hasılat tiền bán hàng 营业收入
References in classic literature ?
Then I seized my coat, which was weighted by the coppers which I had just transferred to it from the leather bag in which I carried my takings.
Over in the vacant lots was Jasper, young, coal black, and of magnificent build, sitting on a wheelbarrow in the pelting sun--at work, supposably, whereas he was in fact only preparing for it by taking an hour's rest before beginning.
On frosty nights the humane Negro prowler would warm the end of the plank and put it up under the cold claws of chickens roosting in a tree; a drowsy hen would step on to the comfortable board, softly clucking her gratitude, and the prowler would dump her into his bag, and later into his stomach, perfectly sure that in taking this trifle from the man who daily robbed him of an inestimable treasure--his liberty--he was not committing any sin that God would remember against him in the Last Great Day.
He's always taking away those newspapers from the window to read.
compensation in takings suits--but that "merely reflects the high
They argued that the Fifth Amendment only applied to takings for "public" purposes, and that a development benefiting private interests, particularly in the absence of adverse economic conditions, was not supported by the Constitution.
Usually, he said, local city councils have a difficult time approving such attempts from a political perspective, while California law allows such takings only when they occur in a blighted area.
I think there is one irony worth mentioning: The rise in private-to-private takings may be an unintended consequence of the thinking that brought us "regulatory takings," that mysterious beast that the Rehnquist Supreme Court cooked up in the 1980s.
Taking Sides on Takings Issues, a new softbound book from the American Bar Association (Chicago, IL), is a reference targeted to both attorneys and law techers and students.
Takings Litigation Handbook: Defending Takings Challenges to Land Use Regulations is designed to assist government attorneys, land use planners, and other local officials understand and apply takings law.
The takings issue derives its inspiration from the Fifth Amendment to the U.
94] Thus, the international community of nations exerts certain moral pressures on states to compensate for the takings from other nations.