talent


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tal·ent

 (tăl′ənt)
n.
1.
a. A marked innate ability, as for artistic accomplishment: has a rare talent for music.
b. Natural endowment or ability of a superior quality: The play has a cast of immense talent.
c. A person or group of people having such ability: The company makes good use of its talent.
2. A variable unit of weight and money used in ancient Greece, Rome, and the Middle East.

[Middle English, inclination, disposition, from Old French, from Medieval Latin, from Latin, balance, sum of money, from Greek talanton; see telə- in Indo-European roots. Sense 3, Middle English, from Old English talente, from Latin talenta, pl. of talentum, from Greek talanton.]

tal′ent·ed adj.
tal′ent·less adj.
tal′ent·less·ness n.

talent

(ˈtælənt)
n
1. innate ability, aptitude, or faculty, esp when unspecified; above average ability: a talent for cooking; a child with talent.
2. a person or persons possessing such ability
3. (Historical Terms) any of various ancient units of weight and money
4. informal members of the opposite sex collectively, esp those living in a particular place: the local talent.
5. an obsolete word for inclination
[Old English talente, from Latin talenta, pl of talentum sum of money, from Greek talanton unit of money or weight; in Medieval Latin the sense was extended to ability through the influence of the parable of the talents (Matthew 25:14–30)]
ˈtalented adj

tal•ent

(ˈtæl ənt)

n.
1. a special, often creative natural ability or aptitude: a talent for drawing.
2. a person or persons with special ability, esp. in a particular field: the theater's major talents; the local talent.
3. a power of mind or body considered as given to a person for use and improvement: so called from the parable in Matt. 25:14–30.
4. any of various ancient units of weight, as a unit of the Middle East equal to 3000 shekels, or of Greece equal to 6000 drachmas.
5. any of various ancient monetary units equal to the value of a talent weight of gold or silver.
6. Obs. inclination or disposition.
[before 900; Middle English, Old English talente < Latin talenta, pl. of talentum < Greek tálanton balance, weight, monetary unit]
tal′ent•ed, adj.
syn: See ability.

Talent

 an abundance or plenty; persons of ability collectively; actors collectively; girls collectively.
Examples: talent of his hatred, 1635; rising talent of the kingdom, 1838; talent of the stage, 1885.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.talent - natural abilities or qualitiestalent - natural abilities or qualities  
natural ability - ability that is inherited
hang, knack, bent - a special way of doing something; "he had a bent for it"; "he had a special knack for getting into trouble"; "he couldn't get the hang of it"
flair, genius - a natural talent; "he has a flair for mathematics"; "he has a genius for interior decorating"
raw talent - powerfully impressive talent
2.talent - a person who possesses unusual innate ability in some field or activity
expert - a person with special knowledge or ability who performs skillfully

talent

noun ability, gift, aptitude, power, skill, facility, capacity, bent, genius, expertise, faculty, endowment, forte, flair, knack Both her children have a talent for music.
Quotations
"Talent is like electricity. We don't understand electricity. We use it" [Maya Angelou]
"Genius does what it must, and talent does what it can" [E.G. Bulwer-Lytton]
"Mediocrity knows nothing higher than itself, but talent instantly recognizes genius" [Sir Arthur Conan Doyle The Valley of Fear]

talent

noun
An innate capability:
Translations
مَوْهِبَةمَوْهِبَه
nadánítalent
talentevne
lahjakkuus
talent
hæfileiki
才能
재능
talants, dotumi
nadarjenost
talang
ความสามารถพิเศษ
năng khiếu

talent

[ˈtælənt]
A. N
1. (= natural ability) → talento m (for para) a writer of great talentun escritor de muchísimo talento
to have a talent for sth: he's got a real talent for languagestiene verdadera facilidad para los idiomas
she had a talent for making people laughtenía el don de saber hacer reír a la gente
2. (= talented people) → gente f capaz, gente f de talento; (= talented person) → talento m
he encourages young talentpromociona a los jóvenes talentos
he watches for talent at away matchesbusca jugadores de talento en los partidos fuera de casa
3. (= opposite sex) → tíos/as mpl/fpl buenos/as, material
there's not much talent here tonightaquí no hay mucho donde escoger esta noche, aquí no hay material
to eye up the talentpasar revista a lo que se ofrece, comprobar el material
4. (Hist) (= coin, weight) → talento m
B. CPD talent contest Nconcurso m de talentos
talent scout, talent spotter Ncazatalentos mf inv

talent

[ˈtælənt] n (= natural ability) → talent m
She's got lots of talent → Elle a beaucoup de talent.
to have a talent for sth → être doué(e) pour qch
He's got a real talent for languages → Il est vraiment doué pour les langues.talent competition talent contest nconcours m d'amateurstalent contest nconcours d'amateurs m (pour découvrir de futurs vedettes)

talent

n
Begabung f, → Talent nt; to have a talent for drawing/mathematicsBegabung fzum Zeichnen/für Mathematik haben; a painter of great talentein hochbegabter or sehr talentierter Maler
(= talented people)Talente pl
(inf: = girls) → Bräute pl (sl); (= boys)Typen pl (sl), → Jungs pl (inf); they went to inspect the local talentsie zogen los, um zu sehen, wie die Bräute dort waren (sl)
(Hist) → Talent nt

talent

:
talent scout
nTalentsucher(in) m(f)
talent show
nTalentwettbewerb m
talent spotter
nTalentsucher(in) m(f) (inf)

talent

[ˈtælənt] n
a. (skill) → talento
he has a talent for languages → è portato per le lingue, ha facilità nell'apprendere le lingue
there isn't much musical talent in this town → non ci sono molti grandi talenti musicali in questa città
there's not much talent about tonight (Brit) (fam) (attractive people) → non c'è nessuno di decente in giro stasera
b. (Bible) → talento

talent

(ˈtӕlənt) noun
a special ability or cleverness; a skill. a talent for drawing.
ˈtalented adjective
(negative untalented) naturally clever or skilful; having or showing great ability. a talented pianist.

talent

مَوْهِبَة talent talent Talent ταλέντο talento lahjakkuus talent talent talento 才能 재능 talent talent talent talento талант talang ความสามารถพิเศษ yetenek năng khiếu 天才

talent

n. talento, habilidad.
References in classic literature ?
Little Raphael," as her sisters called her, had a decided talent for drawing, and was never so happy as when copying flowers, designing fairies, or illustrating stories with queer specimens of art.
A great eagerness to open the door of life to the boy, who had been her pupil and who she thought might pos- sess a talent for the understanding of life, had pos- session of her.
His son lacked not merely the father's eminent position, but the talent and force of character to achieve it: he could, therefore, effect nothing by dint of political interest; and the bare justice or legality of the claim was not so apparent, after the Colonel's decease, as it had been pronounced in his lifetime.
There was one man, especially, the observation of whose character gave me a new idea of talent.
Poor Tamoszius was a man without any relatives, and with a wonderful talent besides, and he ought to have made money and prospered; but he had fallen in love, and so given hostages to fortune, and was doomed to be dragged down too.
It will be perceived, as has been before intimated, that Master Sam had a native talent that might, undoubtedly, have raised him to eminence in political life,--a talent of making capital out of everything that turned up, to be invested for his own especial praise and glory; and having done up his piety and humility, as he trusted, to the satisfaction of the parlor, he clapped his palm-leaf on his head, with a sort of rakish, free-and-easy air, and proceeded to the dominions of Aunt Chloe, with the intention of flourishing largely in the kitchen.
They have no genius or talent for comparatively humble questions of taxation and finance, commerce and manufactures and agriculture.
According to Jim Baker, some animals have only a limited education, and some use only simple words, and scarcely ever a comparison or a flowery figure; whereas, certain other animals have a large vocabulary, a fine command of language and a ready and fluent delivery; consequently these latter talk a great deal; they like it; they are so conscious of their talent, and they enjoy "showing off.
Don't ever tell ME any more that a nigger ain't got any histrionic talent.
Like many other simple-hearted souls, it was her pet vanity to believe she was endowed with a talent for dark and mysterious diplomacy, and she loved to con- template her most transparent devices as marvels of low cunning.
If "nobleness enkindleth nobleness," so does enthusiasm beget enthusiasm, and so do wit and talent enkindle wit and talent.
It was necessary to the happiness of both; for however dissimilar in temper and outward behaviour, they strongly resembled each other in that total want of talent and taste which confined their employments, unconnected with such as society produced, within a very narrow compass.