tales


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Related to tales: Thales, Pitagoras

tales

 (tālz, tā′lēz)
n. pl. tales
1.
a. A talesman.
b. A group of talesmen.
2. The writ allowing for a summons of jurors.

[Middle English, from Medieval Latin tālēs dē circumstantibus, such (persons) from those standing about (a phrase used in the writ), from Latin, pl. of tālis, such; see to- in Indo-European roots.]

tales

(ˈteɪliːz)
n
1. (Law) (functioning as plural) a group of persons summoned from among those present in court or from bystanders to fill vacancies on a jury panel
2. (Law) (functioning as singular) the writ summoning such jurors
[C15: from Medieval Latin phrase tālēs dē circumstantibus such men from among the bystanders, from Latin tālis such]
ˈtalesman n
References in classic literature ?
It was only half a dozen little fairy tales, but Jo had worked over them patiently, putting her whole heart into her work, hoping to make something good enough to print.
Sometimes the doctor launched into long tales concerning himself.
Some of the cottonwoods had already turned, and the yellow leaves and shining white bark made them look like the gold and silver trees in fairy tales.
She now issued forth, as would appear, to defend the entrance, looking, we must needs say, amazingly like the dragon which, in fairy tales, is wont to be the guardian over an enchanted beauty.
This, in fact -- a desire to put myself in my true position as editor, or very little more, of the most prolix among the tales that make up my volume -- this, and no other, is my true reason for assuming a personal relation with the public.
The whole neighborhood abounds with local tales, haunted spots, and twilight superstitions; stars shoot and meteors glare oftener across the valley than in any other part of the country, and the nightmare, with her whole ninefold, seems to make it the favorite scene of her gambols.
As they narrated to each other their unholy adventures, their tales of terror told in words of mirth; as their uncivilized laughter forked upwards out of them, like the flames from the furnace; as to and fro, in their front, the harpooneers wildly gesticulated with their huge pronged forks and dippers; as the wind howled on, and the sea leaped, and the ship groaned and dived, and yet steadfastly shot her red hell further and further into the blackness of the sea and the night, and scornfully champed the white bone in her mouth, and viciously spat round her on all sides; then the rushing Pequod, freighted with savages, and laden with fire, and burning a corpse, and plunging into that blackness of darkness, seemed the material counterpart of her monomaniac commander's soul.
That man who had been sent to Jurgis' father by the boss, he would rise; the man who told tales and spied upon his fellows would rise; but the man who minded his own business and did his work--why, they would "speed him up" till they had worn him out, and then they would throw him into the gutter.
It was hard to associate them with anything cruel or dreadful; and yet they dealt in tales of blood and suffering with a guileless relish that made me almost forget to shudder.
One never tires of poking about in the dense woods that clothe all these lofty Neckar hills to their beguiling and impressive charm in any country; but German legends and fairy tales have given these an added charm.
And he made every one of them tell him a tale every night; and he kept that up till he had hogged a thousand and one tales that way, and then he put them all in a book, and called it Domesday Book -- which was a good name and stated the case.
every now and then, and suddenly halting with finger on lip; moving with hands on imaginary dagger-hilts; and giving orders in dismal whispers that if "the foe" stirred, to "let him have it to the hilt," because "dead men tell no tales.