talking


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Related to talking: Talking Heads

talk

 (tôk)
v. talked, talk·ing, talks
v.intr.
1.
a. To exchange thoughts or opinions in spoken or sign language; converse: We talked for hours. See Synonyms at speak.
b. To utter or pronounce words: The baby can talk.
c. To imitate the sounds of human speech: The parrot talks.
2.
a. To express one's thoughts or emotions by means of spoken language: The candidate talked about the pros and cons of the issue.
b. To convey one's thoughts in a way other than by spoken words: talk with one's hands.
c. To express one's thoughts or feelings in writing: Voltaire talks about London in this book.
d. Usage Problem To convey information in text: The article talks about the latest fashions.
3.
a. To negotiate with someone; parley: Let's talk instead of fighting.
b. To consult or confer with someone: I talked with the doctor.
4. To spread rumors; gossip: If you do that, people will talk.
5. To allude to something: Are you talking about last week?
6. To reveal information concerning oneself or others, especially under pressure: Has the prisoner talked?
7. Informal To be efficacious: Money talks.
v.tr.
1. To utter or pronounce (words): Their son is talking sentences now.
2.
a. To speak about or discuss (something) or give expression to (something): talk business; talk treason.
b. Used to emphasize the extent or seriousness of something being mentioned: The police found money in the car. We're talking significant amounts of money.
3. To speak or know how to speak (a language or a language variety): The passenger talked French with the flight crew. Can you talk the local dialect?
4. To cause (someone) to be in a certain state or to do something by talking: They talked me into coming.
n.
1. An exchange of ideas or opinions; a conversation: We had a nice talk over lunch.
2. A speech or lecture: He gave a talk on art.
3. Hearsay, rumor, or speculation: There is talk of bankruptcy.
4. A subject of conversation: a musical that is the talk of the town.
5. often talks A conference or negotiation: peace talks.
6.
a. A particular manner of speech: baby talk; honeyed talk.
b. Empty speech or unnecessary discussion: a lot of talk and no action.
c. Jargon or slang: prison talk.
7. Something, such as the sounds of animals, felt to resemble human talk: whale talk.
Phrasal Verbs:
talk around
1. To persuade: I talked them around to my point of view.
2. To speak indirectly about: talked around the subject but never got to the point.
talk away
To spend (a period of time) by talking: We talked the night away.
talk at
To address (someone) orally with no regard for or interest in a reaction or response.
talk back
To make an impertinent or insolent reply.
talk down
1. To think or speak of as having little worth; depreciate: talked down the importance of the move.
2. To speak with insulting condescension: talked down to her subordinates.
3. To silence (a person), especially by speaking in a loud and domineering manner.
4. To direct and control (the flight of an aircraft during an approach for landing) by radioed instructions either from the ground or a nearby aircraft.
talk out
1. To discuss (a matter) exhaustively: I talked out the problem with a therapist.
2. To resolve or settle by discussion.
3. Chiefly British To block (proposed legislation) by filibustering.
talk over
1. To consider thoroughly in conversation; discuss: talked the matter over.
2. To win (someone) over by persuasion: talked them over to our side.
talk through
To help (someone) do something by giving instructions as the task is being done.
talk up
1. To speak in favor of; promote: talked the candidate up; talked up the new product.
2. To speak loudly in a frank, often insolent manner.
Idioms:
talk big Informal
To brag.
talk sense
To speak rationally and coherently.
talk the talk
To speak knowledgeably about something, especially something that one claims or implies one can do well.

[Middle English talken; see del- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: The phrasal verbs talk about and (less commonly) talk of sometimes have a piece of writing as their subject, as in The article talks about the humanitarian crisis in the Sudan and The book talks of continuing barriers to free trade. While this usage might seem a natural semantic extension—no different, really, from the similar and widely accepted use of the word discuss—for many people talk remains primarily associated with speaking, and using it for a written medium violates a norm of standard grammar. The Usage Panel has mixed feelings about this construction. In our 2001 survey, 58 percent accepted it in the sentence The book talks about drugs that exist in many of our communities. Writers who wish to avoid the problem can use discuss or another nonspeaking verb such as argue or maintain instead.

talking

(ˈtɔːkɪŋ)
n
the act of expressing one's thoughts, feelings, or desires by means of words; speaking: He did all the talking..
adj
having the ability to talk
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.talking - an exchange of ideas via conversationtalking - an exchange of ideas via conversation; "let's have more work and less talk around here"
conversation - the use of speech for informal exchange of views or ideas or information etc.
pious platitude, cant - insincere talk about religion or morals
dialog, dialogue, duologue - a conversation between two persons
heart-to-heart - an intimate talk in private; "he took me aside for a little heart-to-heart"
shmooze - (Yiddish) a warm heart-to-heart talk
shop talk - talk about your business that only others in the same business can understand
idle words, jazz, malarkey, malarky, nothingness, wind - empty rhetoric or insincere or exaggerated talk; "that's a lot of wind"; "don't give me any of that jazz"
chatter, yack, yak, yakety-yak, cackle - noisy talk

talking

noun
Related words
like logomania
Translations

talking

[ˈtɔːkɪŋ]
A. ADJ [bird, doll] → que habla
B. N we could hear talking downstairsoíamos a algn hablando abajo
she does all the talkingella es quien habla siempre
I'll do the talkingyo seré el que hable
no talking, please!¡silencio, por favor!
C. CPD talking book Naudiolibro m
talking head N (TV) → busto m parlante
talking newspaper Nperiódico m grabado (en cinta)
talking picture Npelícula f sonora
talking point Ntema m de conversación
talking shop N (esp Brit) → reunión f donde se habla mucho pero no se hace nada

talking

nReden nt, → Sprechen nt; no talking please!bitte Ruhe!, Sprechen verboten!; I’ll let you do the talkingich überlasse das Reden Ihnen; he did all the talkinger übernahm das Reden; his constant talking will drive me madsein dauerndes Gerede or Geschwätz macht mich noch verrückt; that’s enough talking!Ruhe jetzt!, Schluss mit dem Reden!

talking

:
talking bird
talking book
n (for the blind etc) → Hörbuch nt
talking doll
nsprechende Puppe, Sprechpuppe f
talking head
n (TV) → Kopfaufnahme f, → Brustbild nt
talking picture
n (old)Tonfilm m
talking point
talking shop
n (esp Brit pej inf) → Quasselbude f (inf)
talking-to
n (inf)Standpauke f (inf); to give somebody a good talkingjdm eine Standpauke halten (inf)

talking

[ˈtɔːkɪŋ]
1. adj (doll, bird) → parlante
2. nparlare m
I'll do the talking → parlo io
she does all the talking → è lei che tiene in piedi la conversazione
References in classic literature ?
Martha was so busy that Mary had no opportunity of talking to her, but in the afternoon she asked her to come and sit with her in the nursery.
With the young reporter at his side, he ventured in the light of day into Main Street or strode up and down on the rick- ety front porch of his own house, talking excitedly.
We laid off all the afternoon in the woods talking, and me reading the books, and having a general good time.
IT happened one day that the Doctor was sitting in his kitchen talking with the Cat's-meat-Man who had come to see him with a stomach-ache.
She frequently did that, however, when Pollyanna was talking of others--of Dr.
Men don't like talking about the war, you know," Lady Conyers went on.
We were talking to him about you a few days ago," Kochubey continued, "and about your freed plowmen.
Now it was not without some boyish nervousness that I followed my newly made friend, for I confess that I have ever been a poor hand at talking to bar-maids.
It's absurd and unfair," he had told Ruth weeks before, "this objection to talking shop.
Helen was surprised to see how genuine both shock and problem were, but she could think of no way of easing the difficulty except by going on talking.
But while I was thinking it over--thinking what I SHOULD do--I heard two gentlemen talking behind me.
He could not see anything of the performance on account of the mist of suspicion, anger, dismay, and wretchedness which seemed to be before his eyes; but he forced himself to conceal the fact that anything was the matter; he went on talking and laughing.