talks


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talk

 (tôk)
v. talked, talk·ing, talks
v.intr.
1.
a. To exchange thoughts or opinions in spoken or sign language; converse: We talked for hours. See Synonyms at speak.
b. To utter or pronounce words: The baby can talk.
c. To imitate the sounds of human speech: The parrot talks.
2.
a. To express one's thoughts or emotions by means of spoken language: The candidate talked about the pros and cons of the issue.
b. To convey one's thoughts in a way other than by spoken words: talk with one's hands.
c. To express one's thoughts or feelings in writing: Voltaire talks about London in this book.
d. Usage Problem To convey information in text: The article talks about the latest fashions.
3.
a. To negotiate with someone; parley: Let's talk instead of fighting.
b. To consult or confer with someone: I talked with the doctor.
4. To spread rumors; gossip: If you do that, people will talk.
5. To allude to something: Are you talking about last week?
6. To reveal information concerning oneself or others, especially under pressure: Has the prisoner talked?
7. Informal To be efficacious: Money talks.
v.tr.
1. To utter or pronounce (words): Their son is talking sentences now.
2.
a. To speak about or discuss (something) or give expression to (something): talk business; talk treason.
b. Used to emphasize the extent or seriousness of something being mentioned: The police found money in the car. We're talking significant amounts of money.
3. To speak or know how to speak (a language or a language variety): The passenger talked French with the flight crew. Can you talk the local dialect?
4. To cause (someone) to be in a certain state or to do something by talking: They talked me into coming.
n.
1. An exchange of ideas or opinions; a conversation: We had a nice talk over lunch.
2. A speech or lecture: He gave a talk on art.
3. Hearsay, rumor, or speculation: There is talk of bankruptcy.
4. A subject of conversation: a musical that is the talk of the town.
5. often talks A conference or negotiation: peace talks.
6.
a. A particular manner of speech: baby talk; honeyed talk.
b. Empty speech or unnecessary discussion: a lot of talk and no action.
c. Jargon or slang: prison talk.
7. Something, such as the sounds of animals, felt to resemble human talk: whale talk.
Phrasal Verbs:
talk around
1. To persuade: I talked them around to my point of view.
2. To speak indirectly about: talked around the subject but never got to the point.
talk away
To spend (a period of time) by talking: We talked the night away.
talk at
To address (someone) orally with no regard for or interest in a reaction or response.
talk back
To make an impertinent or insolent reply.
talk down
1. To think or speak of as having little worth; depreciate: talked down the importance of the move.
2. To speak with insulting condescension: talked down to her subordinates.
3. To silence (a person), especially by speaking in a loud and domineering manner.
4. To direct and control (the flight of an aircraft during an approach for landing) by radioed instructions either from the ground or a nearby aircraft.
talk out
1. To discuss (a matter) exhaustively: I talked out the problem with a therapist.
2. To resolve or settle by discussion.
3. Chiefly British To block (proposed legislation) by filibustering.
talk over
1. To consider thoroughly in conversation; discuss: talked the matter over.
2. To win (someone) over by persuasion: talked them over to our side.
talk through
To help (someone) do something by giving instructions as the task is being done.
talk up
1. To speak in favor of; promote: talked the candidate up; talked up the new product.
2. To speak loudly in a frank, often insolent manner.
Idioms:
talk big Informal
To brag.
talk sense
To speak rationally and coherently.
talk the talk
To speak knowledgeably about something, especially something that one claims or implies one can do well.

[Middle English talken; see del- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: The phrasal verbs talk about and (less commonly) talk of sometimes have a piece of writing as their subject, as in The article talks about the humanitarian crisis in the Sudan and The book talks of continuing barriers to free trade. While this usage might seem a natural semantic extension—no different, really, from the similar and widely accepted use of the word discuss—for many people talk remains primarily associated with speaking, and using it for a written medium violates a norm of standard grammar. The Usage Panel has mixed feelings about this construction. In our 2001 survey, 58 percent accepted it in the sentence The book talks about drugs that exist in many of our communities. Writers who wish to avoid the problem can use discuss or another nonspeaking verb such as argue or maintain instead.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.talks - a discussion intended to produce an agreementtalks - a discussion intended to produce an agreement; "the buyout negotiation lasted several days"; "they disagreed but kept an open dialogue"; "talks between Israelis and Palestinians"
give-and-take, discussion, word - an exchange of views on some topic; "we had a good discussion"; "we had a word or two about it"
parley - a negotiation between enemies
diplomacy, diplomatic negotiations - negotiation between nations
bargaining - the negotiation of the terms of a transaction or agreement
collective bargaining - negotiation between an employer and trade union
horse trading - negotiation accompanied by mutual concessions and shrewd bargaining
mediation - a negotiation to resolve differences that is conducted by some impartial party
References in classic literature ?
When Dickon talks about it you feel as if you saw things and heard them and as if you were standing in the heather with the sun shining and the gorse smelling like honey--and all full of bees and butterflies.
But at the theatre every one talks so fast that I can scarcely make out what they say; and, besides, there are a great many vulgar expressions which it is unnecessary to learn.
With a kind of wriggle, like a fish returned to the brook by the fisherman, Biddlebaum the silent began to talk, striving to put into words the ideas that had been accumulated by his mind during long years of silence.
Doan' talk to me 'bout Sollermun, Huck, I knows him by de back.
Oh, we parrots can talk in two languages-- people's language and bird-language," said Polynesia proudly.
He did, indeed, seem to like to hear Pollyanna talk, however, and Pollyanna talked, Pollyanna liked to talk--but she was never sure that she would not look up and find him lying back on his pillow with that white, hurt look that always pained her; and she was never sure which--if any--of her words had brought it there.
Nor did they talk like gentlemen, despite the fact that there was nothing offensive in their bearing and that the veneer of ordinary social nicety was theirs.
I have had half a dozen soldier fellows in already this morning to talk about it, and we're simply mad with curiosity.
No one on board, not even Harley and Villa, talked Nalasu's talk.
I had no chance to talk with you, Prince, during the animated conversation in which that venerable gentleman involved me," he said with a mildly contemptuous smile, as if intimating by that smile that he and Prince Andrew understood the insignificance of the people with whom he had just been talking.
I suppose I didn't talk about them in the right way.
Don't get excited when you talk," Ruth admonished Martin, before the ordeal of introduction began.