tallow


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Related to tallow: beef tallow, tallow soap

tal·low

 (tăl′ō)
n.
1. Hard fat obtained from parts of the bodies of cattle or sheep, used in foodstuffs or to make leather dressing, soap, and lubricants, and formerly used to make candles.
2. Any of various similar fats, such as those obtained from plants.
tr.v. tal·lowed, tal·low·ing, tal·lows
1. To smear or cover with tallow.
2. To fatten (animals) in order to obtain tallow.

[Middle English talghe, talowe, either borrowed from Middle Low German talch or descended directly from Old English *tealg-, both ultimately from Proto-Germanic *talga-; probably akin to Gothic tulgus, firm, solid, and Old English tulge, firmly, very.]

tal′low·y adj.

tallow

(ˈtæləʊ)
n
(Chemistry) a fatty substance consisting of a mixture of glycerides, including stearic, palmitic, and oleic acids and extracted chiefly from the suet of sheep and cattle: used for making soap, candles, food, etc
vb
(tr) to cover or smear with tallow
[Old English tælg, a dye; related to Middle Low German talch tallow, Dutch talk, Icelandic tólg]
ˈtallowy adj

tal•low

(ˈtæl oʊ)

n., v. -lowed, -low•ing. n.
1. the hard, rendered fat of sheep and cattle, used to make candles and soap.
2. any similar fatty substances, esp. vegetable tallow.
v.t.
3. to smear with tallow.
[1300–50; Middle English talow, talgh, c. Middle Low German talg, talch]
tal′low•y, adj.

tallow


Past participle: tallowed
Gerund: tallowing

Imperative
tallow
tallow
Present
I tallow
you tallow
he/she/it tallows
we tallow
you tallow
they tallow
Preterite
I tallowed
you tallowed
he/she/it tallowed
we tallowed
you tallowed
they tallowed
Present Continuous
I am tallowing
you are tallowing
he/she/it is tallowing
we are tallowing
you are tallowing
they are tallowing
Present Perfect
I have tallowed
you have tallowed
he/she/it has tallowed
we have tallowed
you have tallowed
they have tallowed
Past Continuous
I was tallowing
you were tallowing
he/she/it was tallowing
we were tallowing
you were tallowing
they were tallowing
Past Perfect
I had tallowed
you had tallowed
he/she/it had tallowed
we had tallowed
you had tallowed
they had tallowed
Future
I will tallow
you will tallow
he/she/it will tallow
we will tallow
you will tallow
they will tallow
Future Perfect
I will have tallowed
you will have tallowed
he/she/it will have tallowed
we will have tallowed
you will have tallowed
they will have tallowed
Future Continuous
I will be tallowing
you will be tallowing
he/she/it will be tallowing
we will be tallowing
you will be tallowing
they will be tallowing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been tallowing
you have been tallowing
he/she/it has been tallowing
we have been tallowing
you have been tallowing
they have been tallowing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been tallowing
you will have been tallowing
he/she/it will have been tallowing
we will have been tallowing
you will have been tallowing
they will have been tallowing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been tallowing
you had been tallowing
he/she/it had been tallowing
we had been tallowing
you had been tallowing
they had been tallowing
Conditional
I would tallow
you would tallow
he/she/it would tallow
we would tallow
you would tallow
they would tallow
Past Conditional
I would have tallowed
you would have tallowed
he/she/it would have tallowed
we would have tallowed
you would have tallowed
they would have tallowed

Tallow

Rendered fat of cattle and sheep.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tallow - obtained from suet and used in making soap, candles and lubricants
animal oil - any oil obtained from animal substances
beef tallow - tallow obtained from a bovine animal
dubbin - tallow mixed with oil; used to make leather soft and waterproof
mutton tallow - tallow from the body of a mature sheep
Translations
tali
loj
loj

tallow

[ˈtæləʊ] Nsebo m

tallow

nTalg m, → Unschlitt m (old); tallow candleTalglicht nt

tallow

[ˈtæləʊ] nsego
References in classic literature ?
He saw the blaze of the fire, Kloo- kooch cooking, and Grey Beaver squatting on his hams and mumbling a chunk of raw tallow.
I got in late and was shown to my room on the ground floor by an apologetic night-clerk with a tallow candle, which he considerately left with me.
Each new feature only brought out the whole figure in all its force and vigor, as it had suddenly come to him from the spot of tallow.
The beautiful candle is extinguished and I have henceforth, only a wretched tallow dip which smokes in my nose.
de la S-, the most Scandinavian- looking of Provencal squires, fair, and six feet high, as became a descendant of sea-roving Northmen, authoritative, incisive, wittily scornful, with a comedy in three acts in his pocket, and in his breast a heart blighted by a hopeless passion for his beautiful cousin, married to a wealthy hide and tallow merchant.
By the light of a tallow candle which had been placed on one end of a rough table a man was reading something written in a book.
two inches of sallow, sorrowful, consumptive tallow candle, that
Were you never in the larder, where cheeses lie on the shelves, and hams hang from above; where one dances about on tallow candles: that place where one enters lean, and comes out again fat and portly?
From these, in a narrow and a dirty street devoted to such callings, Mr Wegg selects one dark shop-window with a tallow candle dimly burning in it, surrounded by a muddle of objects vaguely resembling pieces of leather and dry stick, but among which nothing is resolvable into anything distinct, save the candle itself in its old tin candlestick, and two preserved frogs fighting a small- sword duel.
While grandmother and I washed the dishes and grandfather read his paper upstairs, Jake and Otto sat on the long bench behind the stove, `easing' their inside boots, or rubbing mutton tallow into their cracked hands.
We got an old tin lantern, and a butcher-knife with- out any handle, and a bran-new Barlow knife worth two bits in any store, and a lot of tallow candles, and a tin candlestick, and a gourd, and a tin cup, and a ratty old bedquilt off the bed, and a reticule with needles and pins and beeswax and buttons and thread and all such truck in it, and a hatchet and some nails, and a fishline as thick as my little finger with some mon- strous hooks on it, and a roll of buckskin, and a leather dog-collar, and a horseshoe, and some vials of medicine that didn't have no label on them; and just as we was leaving I found a tolerable good curry-comb, and Jim he found a ratty old fiddle-bow, and a wooden leg.
About night we landed at one of them little Missouri towns high up toward Iowa, and had supper at the tavern, and got a room upstairs with a cot and a double bed in it, but I dumped my bag under a deal table in the dark hall while we was moving along it to bed, single file, me last, and the landlord in the lead with a tallow candle.