talon


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

tal·on

 (tăl′ən)
n.
1.
a. The claw of a bird of prey.
b. The similar claw of a predatory animal.
2. Something similar to or suggestive of an animal's claw.
3. The part of a lock that the key presses in order to shoot the bolt.
4. Games The part of the deck of cards in certain card games left on the table after the deal.
5. Architecture An ogee molding.

[Middle English taloun, from Old French talon, heel, from Vulgar Latin *tālō, tālōn-, from Latin tālus, ankle.]

talon

(ˈtælən)
n
1. (Zoology) a sharply hooked claw, esp of a bird of prey
2. anything resembling a bird's claw
3. the part of a lock that the key presses on when it is turned
4. (Card Games) cards the pile of cards left after the deal
5. (Architecture) architect another name for ogee
6. (Stock Exchange) stock exchange a printed slip attached to some bearer bonds to enable the holder to apply for a new sheet of coupons
[C14: from Old French: heel, from Latin tālus heel]
ˈtaloned adj

tal•on

(ˈtæl ən)

n.
1. a claw, esp. of a bird of prey.
2. the shoulder on the bolt of a lock against which the key presses in sliding the bolt.
3. the cards left over after the deal.
[1350–1400; Middle English taloun < Anglo-French; Old French talon < Vulgar Latin *tālōnem, acc. of *tālō, for Latin tālus heel]
tal′oned, adj.

tal·on

(tăl′ən)
A sharp, curved claw on the foot of a bird or other animal such as a lizard, used for seizing and tearing prey.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.talon - a sharp hooked claw especially on a bird of preytalon - a sharp hooked claw especially on a bird of prey
bird's foot - the foot of a bird
claw - sharp curved horny process on the toe of a bird or some mammals or reptiles
Translations
pařát
klo
kynsi
kló
nags
yırtıcı kuş pençesi

talon

[ˈtælən] Ngarra f

talon

[ˈtælən] n [bird of prey] → serre f

talon

nKralle f, → Klaue f; (fig, of person) → Kralle f

talon

[ˈtælən] nartiglio

talon

(ˈtӕlən) noun
the claw of a bird of prey.

tal·on

n. talón, parte posterior de un diente molar.
References in classic literature ?
He introduced himself, smiling a smirky smile borrowed from the courtiers of the stage, extended a fair-skinned talon, and while he gripped my hand in it he bent his body forward three times at the hips, as the stage courtier does, and said in the airiest and most condescending and patronizing way--I quite remember his exact language:
This is the hour of pride and power, Talon and tush and claw.
One curved talon hooked itself into the waist band of his pajama trousers, ripping them from him as the lioness sped by.
He put out a strangely distorted talon and gripped my fingers.
Crushed and impoverished by taxation -- imposed by Mazarin, whose avarice impelled him to grind them down to the very dust -- the people, as the Advocate-General Talon described it, had nothing left to them except their souls; and as those could not be sold by auction, they began to murmur.
I told them that if we only gave you a chance you would be a perfect talon rouge.
The banth toppled sideways at the same instant that it attempted to spring; a raking talon passed close to Gahan's head at the moment that his sword lunged through the savage heart, and as the warrior wrenched his blade from the carcass it slipped silently over the side of the ship.
I can see her now, as I write these lines, a leap in advance, her gray hair flying in thin tangled strings, the blood dripping down her forehead from some wound in the scalp, in her right hand a hatchet, her left hand, lean and wrinkled, a yellow talon, gripping the air convulsively.
the other repeated, reaching his one talon into his side coat pocket with swift definiteness.
In olden times an eagle swooped down upon the New England coast, and carried off an infant Indian in his talons.
I put the bowl to the woman's lips, and as she gripped it with her eager talons the shutter came open and a strong light flooded her face.
The ultimate issue of this affair does not appear; but as the house of Cassilis are still in possession of the greater part of the feus and leases which belonged to Crossraguel Abbey, it is probable the talons of the King of Carrick were strong enough, in those disorderly times, to retain the prey which they had so mercilessly fixed upon.