tamer


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tame

 (tām)
adj. tam·er, tam·est
1. Brought from wildness into a domesticated or tractable state.
2. Naturally unafraid; not timid: "The sea otter is gentle and relatively tame" (Peter Matthiessen).
3. Submissive; docile; fawning: tame obedience.
4. Insipid; flat: a tame birthday party.
5. Sluggish; languid; inactive: a tame river.
tr.v. tamed, tam·ing, tames
1. To make tame; domesticate: tame a wild horse.
2. To subdue or curb: tamed his explosive anger.
3. To change from an uncontrolled or disorderly to a controlled state: needed some gel to tame his hair.

[Middle English, from Old English tam; see demə- in Indo-European roots.]

tam′a·ble, tame′a·ble adj.
tame′ly adv.
tame′ness n.
tam′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tamer - an animal trainer who tames wild animalstamer - an animal trainer who tames wild animals
animal trainer, handler - one who trains or exhibits animals
Translations
krotitel
kesyttäjä

tamer

[ˈteɪməʳ] Ndomador(a) m/f

tamer

n (of animals)Bändiger(in) m(f), → Dompteur(in) m(f)
References in classic literature ?
A two-fold office the gods allotted you, O Shaker of the Earth, to be a tamer of horses and a saviour of ships!
We were in just the state of equilibrium that would remain in one of those "Happy Family" cages which animal-tamers exhibit, if the tamer were to leave it for ever.
Were we among the tamer scenes of nature I might fear to encounter your unbelief, perhaps your ridicule; but many things will appear possible in these wild and mysterious regions which would provoke the laughter of those unacquainted with the ever- varied powers of nature; nor can I doubt but that my tale conveys in its series internal evidence of the truth of the events of which it is composed.
Formerly the birds appear to have been even tamer than at present.
So it has been since the days of Hecuba, and of Hector, Tamer of horses; inside the gates, the women with streaming hair and uplifted hands offering prayers, watching the world's combat from afar, filling their long, empty days with memories and fears; outside, the men, in fierce struggle with things divine and human, quenching memory in the stronger light of purpose, losing the sense of dread and even of wounds in the hurrying ardor of action.
He had the courage to slowly tame the countess by bringing her sweetmeats; he took such pains in choosing them, and he learned so well how to keep the little conquests he sought to make upon her instincts--that last shred of her intellect --that he ended by making her much TAMER than she had ever been.
She had meant to ask him why it is that the sparrows in Lincoln's Inn Fields are tamer than the sparrows in Hyde Park--perhaps it is that the passers-by are rarer, and they come to recognize their benefactors.
There were other bridge-builders in the world, certainly, but it was always Alexander's picture that the Sunday Supplement men wanted, because he looked as a tamer of rivers ought to look.
On the other hand, habit alone in some cases has sufficed; no animal is more difficult to tame than the young of the wild rabbit; scarcely any animal is tamer than the young of the tame rabbit; but I do not suppose that domestic rabbits have ever been selected for tameness; and I presume that we must attribute the whole of the inherited change from extreme wildness to extreme tameness, simply to habit and long-continued close confinement.
I think that a description of any loud, stirring, tumultuous episode must be tamer in German than in English.
He fell heavily to the ground and Ulysses vaunted over him saying, "O Socus, son of Hippasus tamer of horses, death has been too quick for you and you have not escaped him: poor wretch, not even in death shall your father and mother close your eyes, but the ravening vultures shall enshroud you with the flapping of their dark wings and devour you.
Seen in that light he was well worth taming, and I suppose every woman at the bottom of her heart considers herself as a tamer of strange beasts.