tangible


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Related to tangible: Tangible net worth

tan·gi·ble

 (tăn′jə-bəl)
adj.
1.
a. Discernible by the touch; palpable: a tangible roughness of the skin.
b. Possible to touch.
c. Possible to be treated as fact; real or concrete: tangible evidence.
2. Possible to understand or realize: the tangible benefits of the plan.
3. Law Relating to or being property of a physical nature, such as land, objects, and goods.
n.
1. Something palpable or concrete.
2. tangibles Property having a physical form.

[Late Latin tangibilis, from Latin tangere, to touch; see tag- in Indo-European roots.]

tan′gi·bil′i·ty, tan′gi·ble·ness n.
tan′gi·bly adv.

tangible

(ˈtændʒəbəl)
adj
1. capable of being touched or felt; having real substance: a tangible object.
2. capable of being clearly grasped by the mind; substantial rather than imaginary: tangible evidence.
3. (Law) having a physical existence; corporeal: tangible assets.
n
(often plural) a tangible thing or asset
[C16: from Late Latin tangibilis, from Latin tangere to touch]
ˌtangiˈbility, ˈtangibleness n
ˈtangibly adv

tan•gi•ble

(ˈtæn dʒə bəl)

adj.
1. capable of being touched; material or substantial.
2. real or actual, rather than imaginary or visionary.
3. definite; not vague or elusive: tangible grounds for suspicion.
4. having actual physical existence, as real estate, and therefore capable of being assigned a monetary value.
n.
5. something tangible, esp. a tangible asset.
[1580–90; < Late Latin tangibilis < Latin tang(ere) to touch]
tan`gi•bil′i•ty, tan′gi•ble•ness, n.
tan′gi•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Switch to new thesaurus
Adj.1.tangible - perceptible by the senses especially the sense of touch; "skin with a tangible roughness"
concrete - capable of being perceived by the senses; not abstract or imaginary; "concrete objects such as trees"
impalpable, intangible - incapable of being perceived by the senses especially the sense of touch; "the intangible constituent of energy"- James Jeans
2.tangible - capable of being treated as fact; "tangible evidence"; "his brief time as Prime Minister brought few real benefits to the poor"
concrete - capable of being perceived by the senses; not abstract or imaginary; "concrete objects such as trees"
3.tangible - (of especially business assets) having physical substance and intrinsic monetary value ; "tangible property like real estate"; "tangible assets such as machinery"
business enterprise, commercial enterprise, business - the activity of providing goods and services involving financial and commercial and industrial aspects; "computers are now widely used in business"
intangible - (of especially business assets) not having physical substance or intrinsic productive value; "intangible assets such as good will"
4.tangible - capable of being perceived; especially capable of being handled or touched or felt; "a barely palpable dust"; "felt sudden anger in a palpable wave"; "the air was warm and close--palpable as cotton"; "a palpable lie"
perceptible - capable of being perceived by the mind or senses; "a perceptible limp"; "easily perceptible sounds"; "perceptible changes in behavior"

tangible

tangible

adjective
1. Discernible by touch:
2. Composed of or relating to things that occupy space and can be perceived by the senses:
3. Having verifiable existence:
Translations

tangible

[ˈtændʒəbl] ADJ [object] → tangible; [difference, proof, evidence] → tangible, palpable
tangible assetsbienes mpl tangibles, inmovilizado msing material

tangible

[ˈtændʒəbəl] adj [evidence] → tangible; [relief] → palpable
The relief was almost tangible → Le soulagement était presque palpable.tangible assets nplbiens mpl réels

tangible

adj
(lit)greifbar, berührbar
(fig) resultgreifbar; proofhandfest; assetshandfest, real

tangible

[ˈtændʒəbl] adj (proof, results) → tangibile; (difference) → sostanziale
tangible assets → patrimonio reale

tangible

(ˈtӕndʒəbl) adjective
real or definite. tangible evidence.
ˈtangibly adverb
ˈtangibility noun
References in classic literature ?
All during the first year Louise tried to make her husband understand the vague and in- tangible hunger that had led to the writing of the note and that was still unsatisfied.
Without appearing to differ, in any tangible way, from other people's clothes, there was yet a wide and rich gravity about them that must have been a characteristic of the wearer, since it could not be defined as pertaining either to the cut or material.
I didn't give it for one,--nay, I'll say, besides, that ours is the more bold and palpable infringement of human rights; actually buying a man up, like a horse,--looking at his teeth, cracking his joints, and trying his paces and then paying down for him,--having speculators, breeders, traders, and brokers in human bodies and souls,--sets the thing before the eyes of the civilized world in a more tangible form, though the thing done be, after all, in its nature, the same; that is, appropriating one set of human beings to the use and improvement of another without any regard to their own.
Anything like a tangible reproach gave me courage at once.
Then, the paleness of her face - its haggard aspect having vanished as she recovered flesh - and the peculiar expression arising from her mental state, though painfully suggestive of their causes, added to the touching interest which she awakened; and - invariably to me, I know, and to any person who saw her, I should think - refuted more tangible proofs of convalescence, and stamped her as one doomed to decay.
As she returned to the old place by her toilet-table, the vain hope in the three days of delay, the vain hope of deliverance by accident, came back to her -- this time in a form more tangible than the form which it had hitherto worn.
This troubled me the more for a long time, because I had soon told Steerforth, from whom I could no more keep such a secret, than I could keep a cake or any other tangible possession, about the two old women Mr.
Some were condensing air into a dry tangible substance, by extracting the nitre, and letting the aqueous or fluid particles percolate; others softening marble, for pillows and pin-cushions; others petrifying the hoofs of a living horse, to preserve them from foundering.
However extraordinary the adventure might be, I was now surrounded by mortal, visible, tangible things.
The first tangible cause of disenchantment was when Dick brought home a painter's arsenal on Friday evening.
Is it that there is something in the essence of the thing itself, or that it is a medium, a tangible help, in conveying memories of sympathy and comfort?
How often is it the case that, when impossibilities have come to pass and dreams have condensed their misty substance into tangible realities, we find ourselves calm, and even coldly self-possessed, amid circumstances which it would have been a delirium of joy or agony to anticipate