tangible


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tan·gi·ble

 (tăn′jə-bəl)
adj.
1.
a. Discernible by the touch; palpable: a tangible roughness of the skin.
b. Possible to touch.
c. Possible to be treated as fact; real or concrete: tangible evidence.
2. Possible to understand or realize: the tangible benefits of the plan.
3. Law Relating to or being property of a physical nature, such as land, objects, and goods.
n.
1. Something palpable or concrete.
2. tangibles Property having a physical form.

[Late Latin tangibilis, from Latin tangere, to touch; see tag- in Indo-European roots.]

tan′gi·bil′i·ty, tan′gi·ble·ness n.
tan′gi·bly adv.

tangible

(ˈtændʒəbəl)
adj
1. capable of being touched or felt; having real substance: a tangible object.
2. capable of being clearly grasped by the mind; substantial rather than imaginary: tangible evidence.
3. (Law) having a physical existence; corporeal: tangible assets.
n
4. (often plural) a tangible thing or asset
[C16: from Late Latin tangibilis, from Latin tangere to touch]
ˌtangiˈbility ˈtangibleness n ˈtangibly adv

tan•gi•ble

(ˈt?n dʒə bəl)

adj.
1. capable of being touched; material or substantial.
2. real or actual, rather than imaginary or visionary.
3. definite; not vague or elusive: tangible grounds for suspicion.
4. having actual physical existence, as real estate, and therefore capable of being assigned a monetary value.
n.
5. something tangible, esp. a tangible asset.
[1580–90; < Late Latin tangibilis < Latin tang(ere) to touch]
tan`gi•bil′i•ty, tan′gi•ble•ness, n.
tan′gi•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tangible - perceptible by the senses especially the sense of touch; "skin with a tangible roughness"
concrete - capable of being perceived by the senses; not abstract or imaginary; "concrete objects such as trees"
impalpable, intangible - incapable of being perceived by the senses especially the sense of touch; "the intangible constituent of energy"- James Jeans
2.tangible - capable of being treated as fact; "tangible evidence"; "his brief time as Prime Minister brought few real benefits to the poor"
concrete - capable of being perceived by the senses; not abstract or imaginary; "concrete objects such as trees"
3.tangible - (of especially business assets) having physical substance and intrinsic monetary value ; "tangible property like real estate"; "tangible assets such as machinery"
business enterprise, commercial enterprise, business - the activity of providing goods and services involving financial and commercial and industrial aspects; "computers are now widely used in business"
intangible - (of especially business assets) not having physical substance or intrinsic productive value; "intangible assets such as good will"
4.tangible - capable of being perceived; especially capable of being handled or touched or felt; "a barely palpable dust"; "felt sudden anger in a palpable wave"; "the air was warm and close--palpable as cotton"; "a palpable lie"
perceptible - capable of being perceived by the mind or senses; "a perceptible limp"; "easily perceptible sounds"; "perceptible changes in behavior"

tangible

Translations

tangible

[ˈtændʒəbl] ADJ [object] → tangible; [difference, proof, evidence] → tangible, palpable
tangible assetsbienes mpl tangibles, inmovilizado msing material

tangible

[ˈtændʒəbəl] adj [evidence] → tangible; [relief] → palpable
The relief was almost tangible → Le soulagement etait presque palpable.
tangible assets nplbiens mpl reels

tangible

adj
(lit)greifbar, beruhrbar
(fig) resultgreifbar; proofhandfest; assetshandfest, real

tangible

[ˈtændʒəbl] adj (proof, results) → tangibile; (difference) → sostanziale
tangible assets → patrimonio reale

tangible

(ˈtӕndʒəbl) adjective
real or definite. tangible evidence.
ˈtangibly adverb
ˈtangibility noun
References in classic literature ?
This happened not because they were displeased by the substance of his speech, which had even been forgotten after the many subsequent speeches, but to animate it the crowd needed a tangible object to love and a tangible object to hate.
It was a foregone conclusion that he would be suspected; but, to make it a sure thing there must be tangible proof--such as the actual buying of the poison, and that, with a man of the peculiar appearance of Mr.
just as she might have distinguished between a tangible object and its reflection in a glass, Affery made out this difference with her head going round and round.