tankard


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tank·ard

 (tăng′kərd)
n.
A large drinking cup having a single handle and often a hinged cover, especially a tall pewter or silver mug.

[Middle English, of unknown origin.]

tankard

(ˈtæŋkəd)
n
a. a large one-handled drinking vessel, commonly made of silver, pewter, or glass, sometimes fitted with a hinged lid
b. the quantity contained in a tankard
[C14: related to Middle Dutch tankaert, French tanquart]

tan•kard

(ˈtæŋ kərd)

n.
a large drinking cup, usu. with a handle and a hinged cover.
[1275–1325; Middle English: bucket; compare Middle Dutch tanckaert, Middle French tanquart; orig. uncertain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tankard - large drinking vessel with one handletankard - large drinking vessel with one handle
drinking vessel - a vessel intended for drinking
Translations
إناء مَعْدَني لِشُرْب البيرَه
holbakorbel
krus
fedeles fémkupa
drykkjarkrús
bokalas
kauss/krūze
holbakorbeľ

tankard

[ˈtæŋkəd] Nbock m, pichel m

tankard

[ˈtæŋkərd] nchope f

tankard

n (esp Brit) → Humpen m; (for beer also) → Seidel nt

tankard

[ˈtæŋkəd] nboccale m (con coperchio)

tankard

(ˈtӕŋkəd) noun
a large drinking-mug of metal, glass etc. a beer tankard.
References in classic literature ?
One evening I blindly obeyed his summons, and fetched a long circuit through the streets, but met with no purchase, and came home very weary and empty; but not content with that, I went out the next evening too, when going by an alehouse I saw the door of a little room open, next the very street, and on the table a silver tankard, things much in use in public-houses at that time.
He held in his hand a tankard full of a dark substance, and approaching the gleam of light shed by the lamp he uttered this single monosyllable: "Oh
As truth distinguishes our writings from those idle romances which are filled with monsters, the productions, not of nature, but of distempered brains; and which have been therefore recommended by an eminent critic to the sole use of the pastry-cook; so, on the other hand, we would avoid any resemblance to that kind of history which a celebrated poet seems to think is no less calculated for the emolument of the brewer, as the reading it should be always attended with a tankard of good ale--
and the hearty old Squire finished his draught of ale and set his pewter tankard down with a crash.
Dollop, the landlady of the Tankard in Slaughter Lane.
The Marchioness, holding her cards very tight in both hands, considered which to play, and Mr Swiveller, assuming the gay and fashionable air which such society required, took another pull at the tankard, and waited for her lead.
John Browdie remained standing behind the table, looking from his wife to Nicholas, and back again, with his mouth wide open, until his hand accidentally fell upon the tankard of ale, when he took it up, and having obscured his features therewith for some time, drew a long breath, handed it over to Nicholas, and rang the bell.
On the table -- in token that the sentiment of old English hospitality had not been left behind -- stood a large pewter tankard, at the bottom of which, had Hester or Pearl peeped into it, they might have seen the frothy remnant of a recent draught of ale.
By dint of these experiments, he did at last so satisfy and convince himself, that, after a longer silence than he had yet maintained, he laid down his knife and fork on either side his plate, drank a long draught from a tankard beside him (still keeping his eyes on Joe), and leaning backward in his chair and fetching a long breath, said, as he looked all round the board:
With what a sigh of content you will put down the empty beer tankard and take up your knife and fork
The shouts, the vociferations that resounded through the bars and taverns decorated with glasses, tankards, and bottles of marvelous shape, mortars for pounding sugar, and bundles of straws
One end, indeed, reflected splendidly both light and heat from ranks of immense pewter dishes, interspersed with silver jugs and tankards, towering row after row, on a vast oak dresser, to the very roof.