tapestry

(redirected from tapestries)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

tap·es·try

 (tăp′ĭ-strē)
n. pl. tap·es·tries
1.
a. A heavy cloth woven with rich, often varicolored designs or scenes, usually hung on walls for decoration and sometimes used to cover furniture.
b. A cloth embroidered with designs or scenes, especially one made in the Middle Ages.
2. Something felt to resemble a richly and complexly designed cloth: the tapestry of world history.
tr.v. tap·es·tried (-ĭ-strēd), tap·es·try·ing, tap·es·tries (-ĭ-strēz)
1. To hang or decorate with tapestry.
2. To make, weave, or depict in a tapestry.

[Middle English tapiceri, tapstri, from Old French tapisserie, from tapisser, to cover with carpet, from tapis, carpet, from Greek tapētion, diminutive of tapēs, perhaps of Iranian origin.]

tapestry

(ˈtæpɪstrɪ)
n, pl -tries
1. (Art Terms) a heavy ornamental fabric, often in the form of a picture, used for wall hangings, furnishings, etc, and made by weaving coloured threads into a fixed warp
2. (Knitting & Sewing) another word for needlepoint
3. a colourful and complicated situation: the rich tapestry of London life.
[C15: from Old French tapisserie carpeting, from Old French tapiz carpet; see tapis]
ˈtapestried adj
ˈtapestry-ˌlike adj

tap•es•try

(ˈtæp ə stri)

n., pl. -tries, n.
1. a fabric consisting of a warp upon which colored threads are woven by hand to produce a reversible design, often pictorial, used for wall hangings, furniture coverings, etc.
2. a machine-woven, nonreversible reproduction of this.
v.t.
3. to furnish, cover, or adorn with tapestry.
4. to represent or depict in a tapestry.
[1400–50; late Middle English tapst(e)ry, tapistry < Middle French tapisserie carpeting. See tapis]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tapestry - something that resembles a tapestry in its complex pictorial designstapestry - something that resembles a tapestry in its complex pictorial designs; "the tapestry of European history"
complexity, complexness - the quality of being intricate and compounded; "he enjoyed the complexity of modern computers"
2.tapestry - a heavy textile with a woven designtapestry - a heavy textile with a woven design; used for curtains and upholstery
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
3.tapestry - a wall hanging of heavy handwoven fabric with pictorial designstapestry - a wall hanging of heavy handwoven fabric with pictorial designs
edging - border consisting of anything placed on the edge to finish something (such as a fringe on clothing or on a rug)
hanging, wall hanging - decoration that is hung (as a tapestry) on a wall or over a window; "the cold castle walls were covered with hangings"
Translations
نَسيج مُطَرَّز، تَطْريز
tapisérie
gobelinvægtæppe
faliszõnyeg
myndvefnaîur
gobelenas
gobelēns
tapiséria
tapiserija
duvar örtüsügoblen

tapestry

[ˈtæpɪstrɪ] N (= object) → tapiz m; (= art) → tapicería f

tapestry

[ˈtæpɪstri] n
(= needlework) → tapisserie f
(fig)fresque f
The book presents a tapestry of teenage life in the provinces → Le livre est une fresque de la vie adolescente en province.

tapestry

nWand- or Bildteppich m; (= fabric)Gobelin m; tapestry-makingTapisserie f; it’s all part of life’s rich tapestrydas gibt alles dem Leben mehr Würze

tapestry

[ˈtæpɪstrɪ] n (object) → arazzo, tappezzeria; (art) → mezzo punto

tapestry

(ˈtӕpəstri) plural ˈtapestries noun
(a piece of) cloth into which a picture or design has been sewn or woven, hung on a wall for decoration or used to cover eg the seats of chairs. Four large tapestries hung on the walls.
References in classic literature ?
He was a weaver by trade; had been a skilled workman on tapestries and upholstery materials.
We covered it with swell tapestries borrowed for the occasion, and topped it off with the abbot's own throne.
In all of them there were old pictures or old tapestries with strange scenes worked on them.
He turned them out and, having thrown his hat and cape on the table, passed through the library towards the door of his bedroom, a large octagonal chamber on the ground floor that, in his new-born feeling for luxury, he had just had decorated for himself and hung with some curious Renaissance tapestries that had been discovered stored in a disused attic at Selby Royal.
I could not enter the house, nor was I capable of any movement; but reflecting how important it was that I should be present at what might take place on the occasion, I nerved myself as best I could and went in, for I well knew all the entrances and outlets; and besides, with the confusion that in secret pervaded the house no one took notice of me, so, without being seen, I found an opportunity of placing myself in the recess formed by a window of the hall itself, and concealed by the ends and borders of two tapestries, from between which I could, without being seen, see all that took place in the room.
While the objects around me--while the carvings of the ceilings, the sombre tapestries of the walls, the ebon blackness of the floors, and the phantasmagoric armorial trophies which rattled as I strode, were but matters to which, or to such as which, I had been accustomed from my infancy--while I hesitated not to acknowledge how familiar was all this--I still wondered to find how unfamiliar were the fancies which ordinary images were stirring up.
The walls of the apartment were completely hung with splendid tapestries which hid any windows or doors which may have pierced them.
Then he offered many burnt sacrifices to the gods, and decorated many temples with tapestries and gilding, for he had succeeded far beyond his expectations.
Precious tapestries, and lusters with great gilt chains, were drawn from the cupboards; an army of the poor were engaged in sweeping the courts and washing the stone fronts, whilst their wives went in droves to the meadows beyond the Loire, to gather green boughs and field-flowers.
I remember so well how, with a strange smile on his pale, curved lips, he led me through his wonderful picture gallery, showed me his tapestries, his enamels, his jewels, his carved ivories, made me wonder at the strange loveliness of the luxury in which he lived; and then told me that luxury was nothing but a background, a painted scene in a play, and that power, power over other men, power over the world, was the one thing worth having, the one supreme pleasure worth knowing, the one joy one never tired of, and that in our century only the rich possessed it.
Bellegarde, penniless patrician as he was, was an insatiable collector, and his walls were covered with rusty arms and ancient panels and platters, his doorways draped in faded tapestries, his floors muffled in the skins of beasts.
But there stood great woods on the slopes beyond--old, tall, and brilliant, like unfaded tapestries against the walls of a ruined house.