tapioca


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Related to tapioca: tapioca plant

tap·i·o·ca

 (tăp′ē-ō′kə)
n.
1. A starch made from cassava roots, usually processed as beads or flakes and used for puddings and as a thickening agent in cooking.
2. A dish, especially a pudding, made from this starch.

[Portuguese, from Tupí typióca : ty, juice + pyá, heart + oca, to remove.]

tapioca

(ˌtæpɪˈəʊkə)
n
(Cookery) a beadlike starch obtained from cassava root, used in cooking as a thickening agent, esp in puddings
[C18: via Portuguese from Tupi tipioca pressed-out juice, from tipi residue + ok to squeeze out]

tap•i•o•ca

(ˌtæp iˈoʊ kə)

n.
a cassava preparation, usu. in granular or pellet (pearl tapioca) form, used in puddings and as a thickener.
[1605–15; < Portuguese < Tupi tipioca literally, juice (of cassava) squeezed out, i.e., pulp after squeezing]

tapioca

- Comes from Tupi-Guarani tipi, "residue," and ok/og, "squeeze out."
See also related terms for squeeze.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tapioca - granular preparation of cassava starch used to thicken especially puddingstapioca - granular preparation of cassava starch used to thicken especially puddings
food product, foodstuff - a substance that can be used or prepared for use as food
cassava, manioc - cassava root eaten as a staple food after drying and leaching; source of tapioca
cassava, cassava starch, manioc, manioca - a starch made by leaching and drying the root of the cassava plant; the source of tapioca; a staple food in the tropics
Translations
tapioka
tapioka
tápióka
tapíókamjöl
tapijoka
tapioka
tapioka
topyoka

tapioca

[ˌtæpɪˈəʊkə]
A. Ntapioca f
B. CPD tapioca pudding Npostre m de tapioca

tapioca

[ˌtæpiˈəʊkə] ntapioca m

tapioca

nTapioka f

tapioca

[ˌtæpɪˈəʊkə] ntapioca

tapioca

(tӕpiˈəukə) noun
a type of food obtained from the underground part of the cassava plant.
References in classic literature ?
She looked so like her mother, as she sat there oblivious of the tapioca, that Cassandra was startled into exclaiming:
It seemed that she had been straining tapioca in a little stream which flowed out of the jungle at the rear of the long-house when her attention was attracted by the crashing of an animal through the bushes a few yards above her.
Dobbin went to seek John Sedley at his house of call in the City, the Tapioca Coffee-house, where, since his own offices were shut up, and fate had overtaken him, the poor broken- down old gentleman used to betake himself daily, and write letters and receive them, and tie them up into mysterious bundles, several of which he carried in the flaps of his coat.
When he used to treat the boys in old days at a coffee-house, he would shout and laugh louder than anybody there, and have all the waiters skipping round him; it was quite painful to see how humble and civil he was to John of the Tapioca, a blear-eyed old attendant in dingy stockings and cracked pumps, whose business it was to serve glasses of wafers, and bumpers of ink in pewter, and slices of paper to the frequenters of this dreary house of entertainment, where nothing else seemed to be consumed.
And here he paused, reflecting on his own consummate hypocrisy; for the day was as fine, and the sunshine as bright as it ever is in Coffin Court, where the Tapioca Coffee-house is situated: and Mr.
The first is that tapioca chips were an add-on to banana chips and other snacks made for a very localised audience.
The market by types includes potato, corn, rice, tapioca, mixed grain, and others such as cereals, vegetable, and legumes.
tapioca, or imports from affiliates in countries that ban production of GM crops.
Elias's long wish will come true shortly with the launch of tapioca and banana snacks in Doha.
Continue to cook until tapioca pearls are almost translucent.
Spoon some tablespoons of tapioca pudding to look like frog spawn into the jelly and decorate the surface with the leaf shapes and upturned grape halves.
Wheat, tapioca and rice starches facilitate very different outcomes, from unique applications enabling thicker or thinner batters, to lighter or darker colours for different results.