tardily


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Related to tardily: apparently, exuberantly

tar·dy

 (tär′dē)
adj. tar·di·er, tar·di·est
1. Occurring, arriving, acting, or done after the scheduled, expected, or usual time; late.
2. Moving or progressing slowly; sluggish: walking at a tardy pace.

[Alteration of Middle English tardive, slow, from Old French tardif, from Vulgar Latin *tardīvus, from Latin tardus.]

tar′di·ly adv.
tar′di·ness n.
Synonyms: tardy, late, overdue
These adjectives mean not arriving, occurring, acting, or done at the scheduled, expected, or usual time: tardy in making a dental appointment; late for the plane; an overdue bus.
Antonym: prompt
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.tardily - without speed (`slow' is sometimes used informally for `slowly'); "he spoke slowly"; "go easy here--the road is slippery"; "glaciers move tardily"; "please go slow so I can see the sights"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
2.tardily - later than usual or than expectedtardily - later than usual or than expected; "the train arrived late"; "we awoke late"; "the children came late to school"; "notice came so tardily that we almost missed the deadline"; "I belatedly wished her a happy birthday"

tardily

adverb
Translations

tardily

[ˈtɑːdɪlɪ] ADV (frm) (= belatedly) → tardíamente; (= slowly) → lentamente

tardily

adv arrive, offer, sendverspätet; discoverzu spät
References in classic literature ?
Moreover, much about the same time as Firenzuola was writing, Botticelli's blonde, angular, retrousse women were breaking every one of that beauty- master's canons, perfect in beauty none the less; and lovers then, and perhaps particularly now, have found the perfect beauty in faces to which Messer Firenzuola would have denied the name of face at all, by virtue of a quality which indeed he has tabulated, but which is far too elusive and undefinable, too spiritual for him truly to have understood,--a quality which nowadays we are tardily recognising as the first and last of all beauty, either of nature or art,--the supreme, truly divine, because materialistically unaccountable, quality of Charm!
But I like all the books of Galdos that I have read, and though he seems to have worked more tardily out of his romanticism than Valdes, since be has worked finally into such realism as that of Leon Roch, his greatness leaves nothing to be desired.
Under his escort she went tardily forward to the main front, whose shuttered windows, like sightless eyeballs, excluded the possibility of watchers.
For a moment I hesitated, all my suspicions now suddenly, though tardily, aroused; then, with a shrug of my shoulders, I opened the door and stepped out into the glare of torches that lighted the inner court.
So tardily stole the time in this lonely place, and so eager was the spy to penetrate the motives of an interview so different from what he had been led to expect, that he more than once gave the matter up for lost, and persuaded himself, either that they had stopped far above, or had resorted to some entirely different spot to hold their mysterious conversation.
So promotion had come to him tardily, and by virtue of the slowly-working laws of seniority.
As the night lags tardily on--or rather when it seems to stop altogether, at between two and three o'clock--they find a restless craving on him to know more about the weather, now he cannot see it.
You will find near this place, if you follow not too tardily, a dead hare; eat and be refreshed.
Recent research has shown that the October Days were indisputably women's days, with Lafayette and the guard very definitely and tardily bringing up the rear
As the New Republic observed, however tardily, the only real beneficiary of the Iraq war is the UN.
Except for the mentally ill mom (Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi) and long-suffering dad (Jean-Luc Bideau) of Emilie (Magali Woch), the other parents are revealed tardily in the game.
During the year big changes in national arts administration were proposed by the Department of Culture, Media and Sport, with New Labour somewhat tardily shrugging off the impression that its cultural policy consisted entirely of hanging out at cocktail parties with pop and film stars.