tartar


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Related to tartar: cream of tartar

Tar·tar

 (tär′tər)
n.
See Tatar.

[Middle English Tartre, from Old French Tartare, from Medieval Latin Tartarus, alteration (influenced by Latin Tartarus, Tartarus) of Persian Tātār; see Tatar.]

tar·tar

 (tär′tər)
n.
1. Dentistry A hard yellowish deposit on the teeth, consisting of organic secretions and food particles deposited in various salts, such as calcium carbonate. Also called calculus.
2. A reddish acid compound, chiefly potassium bitartrate, found in the juice of grapes and deposited on the sides of casks during winemaking.

[Middle English tartre, potassium bitartrate, from Old French, from Medieval Latin tartarum, argol, from Medieval Greek tartaron.]

tartar

(ˈtɑːtə)
n
1. (Dentistry) dentistry a hard crusty deposit on the teeth, consisting of food, cellular debris, and mineral salts
2. (Elements & Compounds) Also called: argol a brownish-red substance consisting mainly of potassium hydrogen tartrate, present in grape juice and deposited during the fermentation of wine
[C14: from Medieval Latin tartarum, from Medieval Greek tartaron]

tartar

(ˈtɑːtə)
n
(sometimes capital) a fearsome or formidable person
[C16: special use of Tartar]

Tartar

(ˈtɑːtə)
n, adj
(Languages) a variant spelling of Tatar

tar•tar

(ˈtɑr tər)

n.
2. the deposit from wines, cream of tartar.
3. the intermediate product of cream of tartar, obtained from the crude form, argol.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin tartarum < Late Greek tártaron]
tar•tar′ic (-ˈtær ɪk, -ˈtɑr-) tar′tar•ous, adj.

Tar•tar

(ˈtɑr tər)

n.
1. a member of any of various Mongolian and Turkic peoples who, under Genghis Khan and his successors, ruled parts of central and W Asia and E Europe until the 18th century.
3. (often l.c.) a savage, intractable, or ill-tempered person.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin Tartarus]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tartar - a salt used especially in baking powder
salt - a compound formed by replacing hydrogen in an acid by a metal (or a radical that acts like a metal)
2.tartar - a fiercely vigilant and unpleasant woman
disagreeable woman, unpleasant woman - a woman who is an unpleasant person
3.tartar - a member of the Mongolian people of central Asia who invaded Russia in the 13th centuryTartar - a member of the Mongolian people of central Asia who invaded Russia in the 13th century
Mongol, Mongolian - a member of the nomadic peoples of Mongolia
4.tartar - an incrustation that forms on the teeth and gumstartar - an incrustation that forms on the teeth and gums
crust, encrustation, incrustation - a hard outer layer that covers something
Translations
filet américaintartre

Tartar

[ˈtɑːtəʳ]
A. ADJtártaro
B. Ntártaro/a m/f

tartar

[ˈtɑːtəʳ]
A. N
1. (on teeth) → sarro m, tártaro m
2. (Chem) → tártaro m
3. (Culin) (also cream of tartar) → crémor m tartárico
4. (= woman) (fig) → fiera f
B. CPD
see tartare

tartar

[ˈtɑːrr] n
(on teeth)tartre m
(= tyrant) → tyran mtartare sauce tartar sauce nsauce f tartare

Tartar

nTatar(in) m(f); to catch a Tartar (fig)sich (dat)etwas Übles einhandeln

tartar

1
n (fig)Tyrann(in) m(f)

tartar

2
n (on teeth) → Zahnstein m

tartar

1 [ˈtɑːtəʳ] n (on teeth) → tartaro
cream of tartar → cremortartaro

tartar

2 [ˈtɑːtəʳ] n (fig) → despota m

tartar

n (dent) cálculo (form), sarro (dental)
References in classic literature ?
The color of the Indian, the writer believes, is peculiar to himself, and while his cheek-bones have a very striking indication of a Tartar origin, his eyes have not.
He was famed for great knowledge and skill in horsemanship, being as dexterous on horseback as a Tartar.
Well, I'd been selling an article to take the tartar off the teeth -- and it does take it off, too, and generly the enamel along with it -- but I stayed about one night longer than I ought to, and was just in the act of sliding out when I ran across you on the trail this side of town, and you told me they were coming, and begged me to help you to get off.
Creakle had not preferred his claim to being a Tartar without reason; that he was the sternest and most severe of masters; that he laid about him, right and left, every day of his life, charging in among the boys like a trooper, and slashing away, unmercifully.
But my heart has gone to the Tartar war, To bleak Kansuh and the steppes of snow, Calling my husband back to me.
The supper consisted of a roast pheasant garnished with Corsican blackbirds; a boar's ham with jelly, a quarter of a kid with tartar sauce, a glorious turbot, and a gigantic lobster.
She is eighteen years of age, and has been sent to Brussels to finish her education; she is of middle size, stiffly made, body long, legs short, bust much developed but not compactly moulded, waist disproportionately compressed by an inhumanly braced corset, dress carefully arranged, large feet tortured into small bottines, head small, hair smoothed, braided, oiled, and gummed to perfection; very low forehead, very diminutive and vindictive grey eyes, somewhat Tartar features, rather flat nose, rather high-cheek bones, yet the ensemble not positively ugly; tolerably good complexion.
I have not been here very long, but I can tell you that what I have seen and verified makes my Tartar blood boil.
The village soon presented the appearance of a busy fair; and as horses were in demand, the purlieus and the adjacent plain were like the vicinity of a Tartar encampment; horses were put through all their paces, and horsemen were careering about with that dexterity and grace for which the Arickaras are noted.
Take a glass of boiled water and put a pinch of cream of tartar," and he indicated with his delicate fingers what he meant by a pinch.
He was a very quick and gay intelligence, with more sympathy for my love of our author's humor than for my love of his sentiment, and I can remember very well the twinkle of his little sharp black eyes, with their Tartar slant, and the twitching of his keenly pointed, sensitive nose, when we came to some passage of biting satire, or some phrase in which the bitter Jew had unpacked all the insult of his soul.
The Tartar type was in the little eyes and the flattened nose turned slightly up, in the frigid lips and the short chin.