tater


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Related to tater: Tatar

ta·ter

 (tā′tər)
n. Upper Southern US
Variant of potato.

[Shortening and alteration of potato.]
Our Living Language Since English is a language that stresses some syllables and not others, weakly stressed syllables, especially those preceding strong stresses, are dropped at times. This process, called aphesis when it occurs at the beginning of a word, is more common in regional American dialects than in the more conservative Standard English, which tends to retain in pronunciation anything reflected in spelling. Although many American dialects feature aphesis, it is most famous in the dialects of the South, where it yields pronunciations such as count of for (on) account of, possum for opossum, tater for potato, and skeeter for mosquito. See Note at holler2

tater

(ˈteɪtə)
n
(Plants) a dialect word for potato

ta•ter

(ˈteɪ tər)

n. Dial.
potato.
[1750–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tater - an edible tuber native to South Americatater - an edible tuber native to South America; a staple food of Ireland
starches - foodstuff rich in natural starch (especially potatoes, rice, bread)
solanaceous vegetable - any of several fruits of plants of the family Solanaceae; especially of the genera Solanum, Capsicum, and Lycopersicon
root vegetable - any of various fleshy edible underground roots or tubers
baked potato - potato that has been cooked by baking it in an oven
chips, french fries, french-fried potatoes, fries - strips of potato fried in deep fat
home fries, home-fried potatoes - sliced pieces of potato fried in a pan until brown and crisp
jacket - the outer skin of a potato
mashed potato - potato that has been peeled and boiled and then mashed
Uruguay potato - similar to the common potato
Solanum tuberosum, white potato, white potato vine, potato - annual native to South America having underground stolons bearing edible starchy tubers; widely cultivated as a garden vegetable; vines are poisonous
References in classic literature ?
bout ten year ole dat 'uz good to me, en hadn't no mammy, po' thing, en I loved her en she loved me; en she come out whah I uz' workin' en she had a roasted tater, en tried to slip it to me-- robbin' herself, you see, 'ca'se she knowed de overseer didn't give me enough to eat--en he ketched her at it, en giver her a lick acrost de back wid his stick, which 'uz as thick as a broom handle, en she drop' screamin' on de groun', en squirmin' en wallerin' aroun' in de dust like a spider dat's got crippled.
But his mother threw down her knitting, and, hurrying after him, took hold of his arm, and said, in a tone of plaintive remonstrance, "Nay, my lad, my lad, thee munna go wi'out thy supper; there's the taters wi' the gravy in 'em, just as thee lik'st 'em.
Young gentlemen generally has been overdosed with taters.
Good, plain, common cookin', Jinny'll do;--make a good pone o' bread,--bile her taters far,--her corn cakes isn't extra, not extra now, Jinny's corn cakes isn't, but then they's far,--but, Lor, come to de higher branches, and what can she do?
Lors, she's fine an' comfor'ble now, my old mother is; she ates her baked meat an' taters as often as she likes.
He also mentioned Barack Obama pardoning two turkeys, Tater and Tot, during his last year as President in 2016.
After the pardoning, Drumstick and Wishbone will join last year's turkeys, Tater and Tot, at Virginia Tech's "Gobblers Rest" exhibit," the tweet added.
The Republican president couldn't resist referring to his predecessor, former Democratic President Barack Obama, who pardoned two turkeys named Tater and Tot last year.
Unlike most convenience foods from the postwar era, Tater Tots have been given a pass to reenter the culture.
Then it's up to the intergalactic tubers, as you spend your collected wattage on an increasingly costly variety of Probetatos, Spudniks and Tater Towers, all of which amplify the overall energy production.
Young Jedi and collectors alike will make a galaxy's worth of wacky tater blends with this spud.