tatters


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tat·ter 1

 (tăt′ər)
n.
1. A torn and hanging piece of cloth; a shred.
2. tatters Torn and ragged clothing; rags.
tr. & intr.v. tat·tered, tat·ter·ing, tat·ters
To make or become ragged.

[Middle English tater, of Scandinavian origin.]

tat·ter 2

 (tăt′ər)
n.
One that makes tatting, especially as a livelihood.

tatters

(ˈtætəz)
pl n
torn or ragged pieces, esp of material
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

tatters

plural noun
1. rags, scraps, shreds, bits, pieces, fragments The walls are bare with a few tatters of wallpaper here and there.
in tatters
2. ragged, torn, ripped, tattered, in rags, in shreds His jersey was left in tatters.
3. in ruins, ruined, devastated, finished, destroyed, shattered, in disarray, dead in the water (informal) The economy was in tatters.
Translations
خِرْقَةٌ من الثِّياب
cáryhadry
laser
tötrar, fataræflar
skutaisudriskęsvieni skutai
skrandas
zdrapy
yırtık pırtık elbise

tatters

[ˈtætəz] NPL (= rags) → andrajos mpl, harapos mpl; (= shreds) → jirones mpl
to be in tatters [clothes] → estar hecho jirones (fig) [reputation] → estar hecho trizas; [marriage] → andar muy mal
the coalition is in tattersla coalición anda muy mal

tatters

[ˈtætərz] npl
to be in tatters [clothes] → être en lambeaux
to be in tatters [reputation, career] → être ruiné(e); [economy] → être en ruines

tatters

plLumpen pl, → Fetzen pl; to be in tattersin Fetzen sein or hängen; his jacket hung in tatterssein Jackett war zerrissen or hing ihm in Fetzen vom Leib; his reputation/confidence was in tatterssein Ruf/Selbstbewusstsein war sehr angeschlagen or hatte sehr gelitten

tatters

[ˈtætəz] nplstracci mpl
in tatters → a brandelli, sbrindellato/a

tatters

(ˈtӕtəz) noun plural
torn and ragged pieces. tatters of clothing.
ˈtattered adjective
ragged or torn. a tattered cloak/book.
in tatters
in a torn and ragged condition. His clothes were in tatters.
References in classic literature ?
Poor Lazarus there, chattering his teeth against the curbstone for his pillow, and shaking off his tatters with his shiverings, he might plug up both ears with rags, and put a corn-cob into his mouth, and yet that would not keep out the tempestuous Euroclydon.
If a commoner gave a noble even so much as a Damiens-scratch which didn't kill or even hurt, he got Damiens' dose for it just the same; they pulled him to rags and tatters with horses, and all the world came to see the show, and crack jokes, and have a good time; and some of the performances of the best people present were as tough, and as properly unprintable, as any that have been printed by the pleasant Casanova in his chapter about the dismember- ment of Louis XV.
He, and his old canvas frock, and his loose stockings, and all his poor tatters of clothes, had, in a long seclusion from direct light and air, faded down to such a dull uniformity of parchment-yellow, that it would have been hard to say which was which.
Sitting in among the wares he dealt in, by a charcoal stove, made of old bricks, was a grey-haired rascal, nearly seventy years of age; who had screened himself from the cold air without, by a frousy curtaining of miscellaneous tatters, hung upon a line; and smoked his pipe in all the luxury of calm retirement.
When I at last took courage to return to the room, I found Estella sitting at Miss Havisham's knee, taking up some stitches in one of those old articles of dress that were dropping to pieces, and of which I have often been reminded since by the faded tatters of old banners that I have seen hanging up in cathedrals.
He was clothed with tatters of old ship's canvas and old sea-cloth, and this extraordinary patchwork was all held together by a system of the most various and incongruous fastenings, brass buttons, bits of stick, and loops of tarry gaskin.
HE scrambled out on the first bank he came to, and he hopped home across the meadow with his macintosh all in tatters.
even the eye of her most devoted friend could trace no sign of anything feminine in that mass of rags and tatters.
The coiling uprush of smoke streamed across the sky, and through the rare tatters of that red canopy, remote as though they belonged to another universe, shone the little stars.
She cannot flee, Since her few tatters scarce suffice to clothe Her shrunken limbs.
And my dressing-gown, which will not cover me, such tatters, and she will see all this and she will see Apollon.
Above the splintered mast a sail rent to tatters was waving; suddenly the ropes that still held it gave way, and it disappeared in the darkness of the night like a vast sea-bird.