taught


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taught

 (tôt)
v.
Past tense and past participle of teach.

taught

(tɔːt)
vb
the past tense and past participle of teach

teach

(titʃ)

v. taught, teach•ing. v.t.
1. to impart knowledge of or skill in; give instruction in: She teaches mathematics.
2. to impart knowledge or skill to; give instruction to: He teaches a large class.
v.i.
3. to impart knowledge or skill; give instruction, esp. as one's profession or vocation.
[before 900; Middle English techen, Old English tǣcan; akin to token]
syn: teach, instruct, train, educate share the meaning of imparting information, understanding, or skill. teach is the most general of these terms, referring to any practice that furnishes a person with skill or knowledge: to teach children to write. instruct usu. implies a systematic, structured method of teaching: to instruct paramedics in first aid. train stresses the development of a desired proficiency or behavior through practice, discipline, and instruction: to train military recruits. educate stresses the development of reasoning and judgment; it often involves preparing a person for an occupation or for mature life: to educate the young.

Teach

(titʃ)

n.
Edward ( “Blackbeard” ), died 1718, English pirate and privateer in the Americas.

taught

  • academy - Came from Akademos, the man or demigod for whom Plato's garden, where he taught, was named.
  • pedagogue - A Roman slave who took children to school and on outings, but also taught them—from Greek ped, "child," and agein, "to lead."
  • recant - Can mean "sing again"; its usual meaning stresses the withdrawing or denying of something professed or taught.
  • doctor, physician - Doctor is derived from Latin doctus, "having been taught; learned," from docere, "to teach"; physician comes from Latin physica, "natural science; physics."
Translations

taught

pret. pp. de to teach, enseñado.

taught

pret & pp de teach
References in classic literature ?
The hall was empty, and they had a grand polka, for Laurie danced well, and taught her the German step, which delighted Jo, being full of swing and spring.
In spite of Ned Newton's cry, Tom's finger pressed the switch-trigger of the electric rifle, for previous experience had taught him that it was sometimes the best thing to awe the natives in out-of-the-way corners of the earth.
Subsequent experiences with rattlesnakes taught me that my first encounter was fortunate in circumstance.
A pouch and horn completed his personal accouterments, though a rifle of great length**, which the theory of the more ingenious whites had taught them was the most dangerous of all firearms, leaned against a neighboring sapling.
Your man seems to have other friends; Isaacs & Sons are here, and the type-writer firm who taught him; but what YOU say will help most.
He had once brought her some rare tea from the Chinese camp, and had taught her how to make it; he had cautioned her against sitting under the trees at nightfall; he had once taken off his coat to wrap around her.
On the score of delicacy, or any scrupulousness which a finer sensibility might have taught him, the Colonel, like most of his breed and generation, was impenetrable.
Could I have preserved the picturesque force of his style, and the humourous colouring which nature taught him how to throw over his descriptions, the result, I honestly believe, would have been something new in literature.
But what was still more annoying, Brom took all Opportunities of turning him into ridicule in presence of his mistress, and had a scoundrel dog whom he taught to whine in the most ludicrous manner, and introduced as a rival of Ichabod's, to instruct her in psalmody.
Midwifery should be taught in the same course with fencing and boxing, riding and rowing.
Buffalo Bill taught me the most of what I know, my mother taught me much, and I taught myself the rest.
He was extremely curious to know "from what part of the country I came, and how I was taught to imitate a rational creature; because the YAHOOS (whom he saw I exactly resembled in my head, hands, and face, that were only visible), with some appearance of cunning, and the strongest disposition to mischief, were observed to be the most unteachable of all brutes.