tauiwi

tauiwi

(taʊˈiːwɪ)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) NZ a Māori term for the non-Māori people of New Zealand
[Māori, literally: foreign race]
References in periodicals archive ?
Came referred to posters by Tamaki Treaty Workers (a tauiwi group in Auckland) showing 10 suggested decolonisation actions for change by non-Maori Kiwis.
The Treaty of Waitangi connects us to a history--not just to a signing in 1840, but a history of breaches, of Tauiwi behaving badly, of principles generated at a specific moment in time from certain social and political conditions.
Tauiwi general practitioners' talk about Maori health: Interpretive repertoires.
kei hea te tangata e mohio ana ki nga tini motu o te moana, me nga tauiwi e noho anai te ao nei?
48) Nevertheless, demystifying the darkness a little, at the heart of the relations between Pakeha and Maori lies a schematic of filiation--the friendship between migrant and host, Pakeha and Maori, tauiwi (non-Maori New Zealanders) and tangata whenua (people of the land)?
McCreanor T and Nairn R (2002): Tauiwi general practitioners' talk about Maori health: interpretive repertoires.
Pakeha and other tauiwi have the privilege of choosing to expand the horizons of their world, by embracing other ways of seeing and other models of health, like Te Whare Tapa Wha.
Tauiwi general practitioners' explanations of Maori health: Colonial relations in primary healthcare in Aotearoa/New Zealand?
s (2005) study which found that those who adopted the Pakeha, or Tauiwi (foreigner) identity label, acknowledged the ongoing process of colonisation and their position as members of the dominant social group within New Zealand, whereas those who self-identified as "New Zealanders" made no such acknowledgements.
The difference, for instance, between tangata whenua (the local people of a place or people-place) and tauiwi (foreigners) suggests intra-national modes of relating to the place that bridge long and short history and suggest the real, historical grounds of shared space.
In attempting (unsuccessfully) at that juncture to constitutionalise the Treaty of Waitangi and the Treaty's implied social contract for a bicultural, binational political structure as supreme law, Sir Geoffrey Palmer and his legal team were fully cognisant of the accompanying and reciprocal rights of the tauiwi, given that the Treaty 'bargain' 'is part of the essential inheritance of the Pakeha New Zealander also'.