tautology

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tau·tol·o·gy

(tô-tŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. tau·tol·o·gies
1.
a. Needless repetition of the same sense in different words; redundancy.
b. An instance of such repetition.
2. Logic A statement composed of simpler statements in such a way that it is logically true whether the simpler statements are factually true or false; for example, the statement Either it will rain tomorrow or it will not rain tomorrow.

[Late Latin tautologia, from Greek tautologiā, from tautologos, redundant : tauto-, tauto- + logos, saying; see -logy.]

tau′to·log′i·cal (tôt′l-ŏj′ĭ-kəl), tau′to·log′ic (-ĭk), tau·tol′o·gous (-tŏl′ə-gəs) adj.
tau′to·log′i·cal·ly, tau·tol′o·gous·ly adv.

tautology

(tɔːˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Grammar) the use of words that merely repeat elements of the meaning already conveyed, as in the sentence Will these supplies be adequate enough? in place of Will these supplies be adequate?
2. (Logic) logic a statement that is always true, esp a truth-functional expression that takes the value true for all combinations of values of its components, as in either the sun is out or the sun is not out. Compare inconsistency3, contingency5
[C16: from Late Latin tautologia, from Greek, from tautologos]
tautological, ˌtautoˈlogic, tauˈtologous adj
ˌtautoˈlogically, tauˈtologously adv

tau•tol•o•gy

(tɔˈtɒl ə dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1. needless repetition of an idea in different words, as in “widow woman.”
2. an instance of such repetition.
3. Logic. a compound proposition or propositional form all of whose instances are true, as “A or not A” or “The candidate will win or lose.”
[1570–80; < Late Latin tautologia < Greek tautología. See tauto-, -logy]
tau•to•log•i•cal (ˌtɔt lˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl) tau`to•log′ic, tau•tol′o•gous (-gəs) adj.
tau`to•log′i•cal•ly, tau•tol′o•gous•ly, adv.

tautology

needless repetition of a concept in word or phrase; redundancy or pleonasm. Also tautologism. — tautologist, n.tautological, tautologous, adj.
See also: Language

tautology

unnecessary repetition
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tautology - (logic) a statement that is necessarily true; "the statement `he is brave or he is not brave' is a tautology"
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
true statement, truth - a true statement; "he told the truth"; "he thought of answering with the truth but he knew they wouldn't believe it"
2.tautology - useless repetition; "to say that something is `adequate enough' is a tautology"
repetitiousness, repetitiveness - verboseness resulting from excessive repetitions

tautology

noun repetition, redundancy, verbiage, iteration, verbosity, repetitiveness, prolixity, repetitiousness, pleonasm The tautology and circularity of this argument were swept aside.
Translations
tautologie
tautologiatoisto
redundancijatautologijazalihost
tautológia
tautologie

tautology

[tɔːˈtɒlədʒɪ] Ntautología f

tautology

[tɔːˈtɒlədʒi] ntautologie f

tautology

nTautologie f, → weißer Schimmel (inf)

tautology

[tɔːˈtɒlədʒɪ] ntautologia
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In that article, I cited several reasons tautologies should be eschewed.
Different kinds of SQLIAs known to date are discussed in [3, 4] which include the use of SQL tautologies, illegal queries, union query, piggy-backed queries, etc.
It seems that our revered representatives are now going to occupy themselves with endless debate on the arcane constitutional tautologies of turning the House of Lords into a second elected chamber.
The language is rich but the novel would have benefited from more stringent editing to remove the many tautologies, oxymorons and plain wrong words.
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So [logical not]L and [logical not]U are tautologies.
Leibniz's insights into syntax have informed our understanding of formal grammars ever since but, alas, his notion of blind thought led logicians to an obsession with tautologies that lasted more than two centuries.
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In this way, the ethical code cannot contain tautologies and contradictions but only factual sentences.