tautology


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tau·tol·o·gy

 (tô-tŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. tau·tol·o·gies
1.
a. Needless repetition of the same sense in different words; redundancy.
b. An instance of such repetition.
2. Logic An empty or vacuous statement composed of simpler statements in a fashion that makes it logically true whether the simpler statements are factually true or false; for example, the statement Either it will rain tomorrow or it will not rain tomorrow.

[Late Latin tautologia, from Greek tautologiā, from tautologos, redundant : tauto-, tauto- + logos, saying; see -logy.]

tau′to·log′i·cal (tôt′l-ŏj′ĭ-kəl), tau′to·log′ic (-ĭk), tau·tol′o·gous (-tŏl′ə-gəs) adj.
tau′to·log′i·cal·ly, tau·tol′o·gous·ly adv.

tautology

(tɔːˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Grammar) the use of words that merely repeat elements of the meaning already conveyed, as in the sentence Will these supplies be adequate enough? in place of Will these supplies be adequate?
2. (Logic) logic a statement that is always true, esp a truth-functional expression that takes the value true for all combinations of values of its components, as in either the sun is out or the sun is not out. Compare inconsistency3, contingency5
[C16: from Late Latin tautologia, from Greek, from tautologos]
tautological, ˌtautoˈlogic, tauˈtologous adj
ˌtautoˈlogically, tauˈtologously adv

tau•tol•o•gy

(tɔˈtɒl ə dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1. needless repetition of an idea in different words, as in “widow woman.”
2. an instance of such repetition.
3. Logic. a compound proposition or propositional form all of whose instances are true, as “A or not A” or “The candidate will win or lose.”
[1570–80; < Late Latin tautologia < Greek tautología. See tauto-, -logy]
tau•to•log•i•cal (ˌtɔt lˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl) tau`to•log′ic, tau•tol′o•gous (-gəs) adj.
tau`to•log′i•cal•ly, tau•tol′o•gous•ly, adv.

tautology

needless repetition of a concept in word or phrase; redundancy or pleonasm. Also tautologism. — tautologist, n.tautological, tautologous, adj.
See also: Language

tautology

unnecessary repetition
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tautology - (logic) a statement that is necessarily true; "the statement `he is brave or he is not brave' is a tautology"
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
true statement, truth - a true statement; "he told the truth"; "he thought of answering with the truth but he knew they wouldn't believe it"
2.tautology - useless repetition; "to say that something is `adequate enough' is a tautology"
repetitiousness, repetitiveness - verboseness resulting from excessive repetitions

tautology

noun repetition, redundancy, verbiage, iteration, verbosity, repetitiveness, prolixity, repetitiousness, pleonasm The tautology and circularity of this argument were swept aside.
Translations
tautologie
tautologiatoisto
redundancijatautologijazalihost
tautológia
tautologie

tautology

[tɔːˈtɒlədʒɪ] Ntautología f

tautology

[tɔːˈtɒlədʒi] ntautologie f

tautology

nTautologie f, → weißer Schimmel (inf)

tautology

[tɔːˈtɒlədʒɪ] ntautologia
References in classic literature ?
Methodical, or well arranged, or very well delivered, it could not be expected to be; but it contained, when separated from all the feebleness and tautology of the narration, a substance to sink her spirit especially with the corroborating circumstances, which her own memory brought in favour of Mr.
The declaration itself, though it may be chargeable with tautology or redundancy, is at least perfectly harmless.
I had said the same thing over and over again to see whether the wilful tautology would cause the secretary to open his eyes.
My respected father--let me shorten the dutiful tautology by substituting in future M.
He loved jokes, and in politics, he was the unmatched master of tautology.
In some cases, it creates a brutally succinct expression that matches the realities described; in other cases, the lines seem to lurch forward in a kind of desperate delirium of sonic tautology.
Thus, CAPM suffers from a serious problem of endogeneity or circularity, or both; and even appears to be a tautology.
Stoller uses the same devices she critiques to critique, a tautology she harnesses to resplendent effect.
For example, the concept of power in Machiavelli is said to display the same ambiguity as the Levinasian Other, "poised somewhere between tautology and objective description.
Or the subtle (in bureaucratic eyes) variation, that some people have had the illegal monkeys for so long that they have somehow become "legal" pets because people have "ownership certificates," a tautology that stretches logic and credibility in that "a little bit pregnant" way.
It would be a weather tautology to describe August as windy as that is what it is suppose to be but it is very revealing to find out why, and how the constituent weather elements help create these conditions.
Grouped together under the moniker "Newz1," 2014--, these panels borrow the graphic vocabulary of sign-painting to picture fire, smoke, and alligators, while slyly gesturing toward Bass's earlier work and performances (for example, the smoke recalls the 2011 performance piece Dogs and Fog, in which she filled the same space--then Overduin and Kite--with dogs and fog, before singing with friends atop cinder blocks arrayed in a circle), effecting its own tautology.