taxidermy

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tax·i·der·my

 (tăk′sĭ-dûr′mē)
n.
The art or operation of preparing, stuffing, and mounting the skins of dead animals for exhibition in a lifelike state.

tax′i·der′mal, tax′i·der′mic adj.
tax′i·der′mist n.

taxidermy

(ˈtæksɪˌdɜːmɪ)
n
(Professions) the art or process of preparing, stuffing, and mounting animal skins so that they have a lifelike appearance
[C19: from Greek taxis arrangement + -dermy, from Greek derma skin]
ˌtaxiˈdermal, ˌtaxiˈdermic adj
ˈtaxiˌdermist n

tax•i•der•my

(ˈtæk sɪˌdɜr mi)

n.
the art of preparing, preserving, and stuffing the skins of animals and mounting them in lifelike form.
[1810–20; < Greek táxi(s) arranging (see taxis1) + dérm(a) skin + -y3]
tax`i•der′mal, tax`i•der′mic, adj.
tax′i•der`mist, n.

taxidermy

- The stuffing of dead animals.
See also related terms for stuffing.

taxidermy

the art of preparing, stuffing, and mounting the skins of animals so that they appear lifelike. — taxidermist, n.
See also: Animals
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.taxidermy - the art of mounting the skins of animals so that they have lifelike appearancetaxidermy - the art of mounting the skins of animals so that they have lifelike appearance
artistry, prowess, art - a superior skill that you can learn by study and practice and observation; "the art of conversation"; "it's quite an art"
Translations
تَحْنيط الحَيَوان
taxidermie
állatkitömés
uppstoppun dÿra
iškamšų darymasiškamšų meistras
taksidermija, putnu vai zvēru izbāšana
taxidermia
hayvan doldurma

taxidermy

[ˈtæksɪdɜːmɪ] Ntaxidermia f

taxidermy

[ˈtæksidɜːrmi] ntaxidermie ftaxi driver nchauffeur mf de taxi
She's a taxi driver → Elle est chauffeur de taxi., Elle est chauffeuse de taxi.taxi fare nprix m de la course

taxidermy

nTaxidermie f

taxidermy

[ˈtæksɪˈdɜːmɪ] ntassidermia

taxidermy

(ˈtӕksidəːmi) noun
the art of preparing and stuffing the skins of animals etc.
ˈtaxidermist noun
References in periodicals archive ?
Taxidermically preserved paws and pelts of everything from foxes to bears to beaver to mountain lions to raccoons to bobcats--and small sandboxes for leaving impressions--put the kids into pretend mode in no time.
Napoleon's camel is in the Muse Africain on the island of Aix, while Little Sorrel, Stonewall Jackson's horse, now has his taxidermically prepared hide displayed at the Virginia Military Institute Museum.