teatime


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tea·time

 (tē′tīm′)
n.
The usual or traditional time for serving tea, as late afternoon.

teatime

(ˈtiːtaɪm)
n
Brit the period of the day when people have their tea. It can be eaten either in the late afternoon or in the early part of the evening

tea•time

(ˈtiˌtaɪm)

n.
the time at which tea is served or taken, usu. in the late afternoon.
[1750–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.teatime - a light midafternoon meal of tea and sandwiches or cakesteatime - a light midafternoon meal of tea and sandwiches or cakes; "an Englishman would interrupt a war to have his afternoon tea"
meal, repast - the food served and eaten at one time
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Translations
svačina
sen eftermiddag
teehetki
vrijeme za čaj
ティータイム
티타임
middagsdags
เวลาดื่มน้ำชา
giờ ăn tối

teatime

[ˈtiːtaɪm] N (esp Brit)
1. (= time for drinking tea) → hora f del
at teatimea la hora del té
2. (= time of evening meal) → hora f de cenar

teatime

[ˈtiːtaɪm] n (British) (in afternoon)l'heure f du thé; (in evening)l'heure f du dînertea towel n (British)torchon mtea urn nfontaine f à thé

teatime

[ˈtiːˌtaɪm] nora del tè

teatime

سَاعَةُ تَنَاوُلُ الشَاي svačina sen eftermiddag Teestunde ώρα τσαγιού hora del té teehetki heure du thé vrijeme za čaj ora del tè ティータイム 티타임 theetijd tetid pora podwieczorku hora do chá время обеда middagsdags เวลาดื่มน้ำชา çay saati giờ ăn tối 茶歇时间
References in classic literature ?
At teatime they compared notes, and all agreed that it had been a delightful, though unusually long day.
In the first weeks the days were long; they often, at their finest, gave me what I used to call my own hour, the hour when, for my pupils, teatime and bedtime having come and gone, I had, before my final retirement, a small interval alone.
She had been in one of her bad states - though they had got better of late, rather than worse - for four days, when she came out of it in the evening, just at teatime, and said quite plainly, 'Joe.
Anna Mikhaylovna sat down beside him, with her own handkerchief wiped the tears from his eyes and from the letter, then having dried her own eyes she comforted the count, and decided that at dinner and till teatime she would prepare the countess, and after tea, with God's help, would inform her.
Now, get out your patchwork and have your square done before teatime.
I shall make bold to come out at teatime, and take the chance of finding you at home; if you are not, you know, or the ladies should feel a delicacy in being intruded on, and would rather not be known to me just now, why I can come again another time, any other time would do for me.
It was between five and six o'clock, near the usual teatime, when she came upstairs and said that Master Tom was wanted.
food average, which ties in with the lighter nature of teatime.
Judy said: "We've always felt there was a market for a show like this because all you normally get at teatime is soaps and quizzes.
The heyday for teatime was the Victorian era, and the tradition moved out of the drawing room and into tea and coffee shops in the 1880s, becoming a less formal and more social activity.
One image features three-year-old Hugo Atkinson eating a bowl of spaghetti, while another depicts a neighbour's cat advancing on a teatime cake.
Family worker Elaine Webster said: "Every Thursday we have a teatime and exercise session at Lilac Hall in the village.