technicism


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technicism

(ˈtɛknɪsɪzəm)
n
1. a technical term or phrase
2. (Philosophy) the belief in the utility of technology for improving human societies
References in periodicals archive ?
Even in the 1970s Kirkhart and White (1974) noted that while technicism was OD's enemy, perhaps OD itself was a technique that provided an organization's executives another way to manipulate people.
Scientific evidence related to medical practices highlights a moment of collapse, in which technicism and economic interests have often taken priority in healthcare decisions, at the expense of the real needs of individuals, families and communities (3,4).
The author, therefore, achieves a breakthrough by tying together elements drawn from various disciplines, such as literature, sociology, communication, print media, and politics with acuity and academic scholarship, without falling into technicism or pomposity, making the book accessible to a wider audience.
In a study published in 1961, Mascarenhas and Pacheco discussed the fragmentation of scientific knowledge and its consequences for health, showing that this process had led to technicism and to an incomplete vision of the human being and his needs.
technicism that values computer and other vanguard techniques conceals great methodological poverty" (CARDOSO 1988, p.
Such language, one might even sayjargon (like "provider" referring to the university or college teacher education program), is left mysteriously vague but at the same time captures the seeming objectivity of technicism or techno-positivism.
Or, on the other hand, are we willing to move beyond the rational technicism that has largely characterized the study of instructional communication and embrace a language of critique that would inject ethical, socio-political, and cultural matters into our understandings of educational processes and practice?
And these students want to ask large questions, too important to be ignored--about the loss of work in its modern, industrial sense, or the disintegration of the middle-class and class reproduction in many places, or the reinscription of politics into law, technicism, or "theory," or the elusive meaning of key categories like "property" or "money," or "nature.
Science has endowed technicism with the possibility of limitless growth, and industry has applied this knowledge in the development of innumerable diverse occupations.
Stated more strongly, American psychology has been profoundly colonized by American culture's pragmatism, technicism, individualism, positivism, and secularity.
Using the critique of higher education offered by Allan Bloom, that relativism and sterile technicism have led to a "closing of the American mind," Earls asks us to join in Dewey's rejection of a "quest for certainty" and accept that we do indeed live in uncertainty, which does not mean we live without conviction and a responsibility for our own fate.
In his view, Bolshevism is best understood as having alternated between two major currents--revivalism (a sort of romanticism that prioritized political belief, ideological discipline, and cultural indoctrination) and technicism (a rationalistic drive that stressed economic empiricism, technocratic discipline, and a more laissez-faire approach to culture).