technicist


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technicist

(ˈtɛknɪsɪst)
n
1. a technician
2. (Philosophy) a person who believes in the utility of technology for improving human societies
References in periodicals archive ?
The differences are between technicist and institution-based as opposed to people-centred approaches; and between quantitative and qualitative methodologies.
the overall interior concept builds and develops technicist, to futuristic look of the building and uses simple means of expression.
Schaeffer, which has proved long-lived, but also of the technicist line, which initially inspired K.
Intellectual expertise without liberation from these has, at its extreme, the amoral technicist quality of a Nazi architect expertly designing a gas chamber and crematorium complex.
The application of the technicist critique to both peace work and psychology is both novel and telling.
now and in the near future may uncritically participate in a dramatic ideological change that is taking place--the shift to an exclusive orientation to technicist training at the expense of social concerns.
In a similar description of the construction of professionalism in policy documents and legislative reform in the United Kingdom, Osgood (2006) contends that this "construction of professionalism leaves little time to engage in meaningful critiques of the status quo and as a consequence of social engineering those working with early years become constrained by demands for technicist practice" (p.
He sees 'caring' as an antidote to this technicist approach to education, and sees it in terms of the types of caring exhibited by good parents, a point also made by Whitcombe (2002).
At its core is an elaboration of Williams' critique of formalism, his term for the influence of the more technicist components of Saussure's and the Russian Formalists' work upon 'the cultural turn'.
Apparently the 'thin technicist archaeological description', which he eschews, makes the past 'remote and sterile' (Tilley 2004: 221).
This shift discourages the exercise of professional intelligence in a context of relational complexity and encourages enactment of a technicist conception of teaching.
Hostetler (2002) critiques the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) as supporting a technicist view that devalues practical knowledge, suggesting that they are based on what Cochran-Smith and Lytle label as knowledge for practice.