tedious


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te·di·ous

 (tē′dē-əs)
adj.
1. Tiresome by reason of length, slowness, or dullness; boring. See Synonyms at boring.
2. Obsolete Moving or progressing very slowly.

[Middle English, from Late Latin taediōsus, from Latin taedium, tedium.]

te′di·ous·ly adv.
te′di·ous·ness n.

tedious

(ˈtiːdɪəs)
adj
1. causing fatigue or tedium; monotonous
2. obsolete progressing very slowly
ˈtediously adv
ˈtediousness n

te•di•ous

(ˈti di əs, ˈti dʒəs)

adj.
1. marked by tedium; long and tiresome.
2. tiresomely wordy, as a speaker or writer.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Late Latin taediōsus]
te′di•ous•ly, adv.
te′di•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tedious - so lacking in interest as to cause mental wearinesstedious - so lacking in interest as to cause mental weariness; "a boring evening with uninteresting people"; "the deadening effect of some routine tasks"; "a dull play"; "his competent but dull performance"; "a ho-hum speaker who couldn't capture their attention"; "what an irksome task the writing of long letters is"- Edmund Burke; "tedious days on the train"; "the tiresome chirping of a cricket"- Mark Twain; "other people's dreams are dreadfully wearisome"
uninteresting - arousing no interest or attention or curiosity or excitement; "a very uninteresting account of her trip"
2.tedious - using or containing too many wordstedious - using or containing too many words; "long-winded (or windy) speakers"; "verbose and ineffective instructional methods"; "newspapers of the day printed long wordy editorials"; "proceedings were delayed by wordy disputes"
prolix - tediously prolonged or tending to speak or write at great length; "editing a prolix manuscript"; "a prolix lecturer telling you more than you want to know"

tedious

tedious

adjective
Translations
مُمِل، مُضْجِر
suchopárný
enerverende
hengetönikäväpitkäveteinentylsä
fárasztóunalmas
leiîinlegur
nuobodulys
apnicīgsgarlaicīgs
dolgočasen
enformiglångtråkigtjatig

tedious

[ˈtiːdɪəs] ADJpesado, aburrido

tedious

[ˈtiːdiəs] adj [task, job] → fastidieux/euse; [details, person] → fastidieux/euse; [conversation] → insipide

tedious

adjlangweilig, öde; behaviourermüdend; such lists are tedious to readsolche Listen lesen sich langweilig

tedious

[ˈtiːdɪəs] adjnoioso/a, tedioso/a

tedious

(ˈtiːdiəs) adjective
boring and continuing for a long time. a tedious speech/speaker.
ˈtediously adverb
ˈtediousness noun
ˈtedium noun
boredom; tediousness. the tedium of a long journey.

tedious

a. tedioso-a, aburrido-a, engorroso-a.
References in classic literature ?
We are awake, Duncan," said the soft, silvery tones of Alice within the building, "and ready to travel very fast after so refreshing a sleep; but you have watched through the tedious night in our behalf, after having endured so much fatigue the livelong day
The spectator feels it to be fool's play, when he can distinguish the tedious commonplace of each man's visage, with the perspiration and weary self-importance on it, and the very cut of his pantaloons, and the stiffness or laxity of his shirt-collar, and the dust on the back of his black coat.
Might it not, in the tedious lapse of official life that lay before me, finally be with me as it was with this venerable friend -- to make the dinner-hour the nucleus of the day, and to spend the rest of it, as an old dog spends it, asleep in the sunshine or in the shade?
From the chocks it hangs in a slight festoon over the bows, and is then passed inside the boat again; and some ten or twenty fathoms (called box-line) being coiled upon the box in the bows, it continues its way to the gunwale still a little further aft, and is then attached to the short-warp --the rope which is immediately connected with the harpoon; but previous to that connexion, the short-warp goes through sundry mystifications too tedious to detail.
Unmindful of the tedious rope-ladders of the shrouds, the men, like shooting stars, slid to the deck, by the isolated back-stays and halyards; while Ahab, less dartingly, but still rapidly was dropped from his perch.
Knight-errantry is a most chuckle-headed trade, and it is tedious hard work, too, but I begin to see that there IS money in it, after all, if you have luck.
It was a long and tedious business, for the people made a stubborn and faithful defense.
It was most pesky tedious hard work and slow, and didn't give my hands no show to get well of the sores, and we didn't seem to make no headway, hardly; so Tom says:
But now, at last, on a flaming June day, she found herself happy; her tedious wait was ended; her year-worn advertisement had been answered; and not by a village applicant, no, no
Only the older pupils managed to keep their tickets and stick to their tedious work long enough to get a Bible, and so the delivery of one of these prizes was a rare and noteworthy circumstance; the successful pupil was so great and conspicuous for that day that on the spot every scholar's heart was fired with a fresh ambition that often lasted a couple of weeks.
It seems to you that mainly what you want is to get away; get away from the same old tedious things you're so used to seeing and so tired of, and set something new.
Thus, after a long, tedious effort for years, I finally succeeded in learning how to write.