tediousness


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te·di·ous

 (tē′dē-əs)
adj.
1. Tiresome by reason of length, slowness, or dullness; boring. See Synonyms at boring.
2. Obsolete Moving or progressing very slowly.

[Middle English, from Late Latin taediōsus, from Latin taedium, tedium.]

te′di·ous·ly adv.
te′di·ous·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tediousness - dullness owing to length or slowness
dullness - the quality of lacking interestingness; "the stories were of a dullness to bring a buffalo to its knees"
drag - something tedious and boring; "peeling potatoes is a drag"
Translations
إتْعاب، إضْجار
nuda
monotoni
leiîinlegheit

tediousness

[ˈtiːdɪəsnɪs] tedium [ˈtiːdɪəm] Npesadez f, lo aburrido

tediousness

nLang(e)weile f; his tediousnessseine Langweiligkeit

tediousness

[ˈtiːdɪəsnɪs] tedium [ˈtiːdɪəm] nnoia, tedio

tedious

(ˈtiːdiəs) adjective
boring and continuing for a long time. a tedious speech/speaker.
ˈtediously adverb
ˈtediousness noun
ˈtedium noun
boredom; tediousness. the tedium of a long journey.
References in classic literature ?
He knew not what could be the use of those several clefts and divisions in my feet behind; that these were too soft to bear the hardness and sharpness of stones, without a covering made from the skin of some other brute; that my whole body wanted a fence against heat and cold, which I was forced to put on and off every day, with tediousness and trouble: and lastly, that he observed every animal in this country naturally to abhor the YAHOOS, whom the weaker avoided, and the stronger drove from them.
Is her son determined to submit to this, and to all the tediousness of the many years of suspense in which it may involve you, rather than run the risk of her displeasure for a while by owning the truth?
Art," he continued, with a wave of the hand, "is merely the refuge which the ingenious have invented, when they were supplied with food and women, to escape the tediousness of life.
And it isn't much inconvenience, either, to have one drop of water fall on your head; yet the worst torture of the inquisition is produced by drop after drop, drop after drop, falling moment after moment, with monotonous succession, on the same spot; and work, in itself not hard, becomes so, by being pressed, hour after hour, with unvarying, unrelenting sameness, with not even the consciousness of free-will to take from its tediousness.
What was tranquillity and comfort to Fanny was tediousness and vexation to Mary.
The tediousness of a two hours' wait at Petty France, in which there was nothing to be done but to eat without being hungry, and loiter about without anything to see, next followed -- and her admiration of the style in which they travelled, of the fashionable chaise and four -- postilions handsomely liveried, rising so regularly in their stirrups, and numerous outriders properly mounted, sunk a little under this consequent inconvenience.
One vessel only "in great torment of weather and peril of drowning"* reached home safely, "all the men tired with the tediousness of so unprofitable a voyage to their seeming.
The tediousness and pain of these hours upon the rock grew only the greater as the day went on; the rock getting still the hotter and the sun fiercer.
By way of beguiling the tediousness of these banquets, a select association was formed at the lower end of the table, below the mast, to whose distinguished president modesty forbids me to make any further allusion, which, being a very hilarious and jovial institution, was (prejudice apart) in high favour with the rest of the community, and particularly with a black steward, who lived for three weeks in a broad grin at the marvellous humour of these incorporated worthies.
Cutters, drawn by a single horse, and handsleds, impelled by the gentlemen on skates, would each in turn be used; and, in short, every source of relief against the tediousness of a winter in the mountains was resorted to by the family, Elizabeth was compelled to acknowledge to her father, that the season, with the aid of his library, was much less irksome than she had anticipated.
As I cannot, like Dogberry, find it in my heart to bestow all my tediousness upon the reader, I will not go on to bore him with a minute detail of all the discoveries and proceedings of this and the following day.
With similar recollections Mrs Nickleby beguiled the tediousness of the way, until they reached the omnibus, which the extreme politeness of her new friends would not allow them to leave until it actually started, when they took their hats, as Mrs Nickleby solemnly assured her hearers on many subsequent occasions,