teiid


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tei·id

 (tē′ĭd)
n.
Any of various lizards of the family Teiidae of the Americas, having a long forked tongue, a streamlined body, and large rectangular ventral scales, and including the whiptails and the racerunners.

[From New Latin Teiidae, family name, from Teius, type genus, from Portuguese tejú, tegu; see tegu.]

tei′id adj.

teiid

(ˈtiːɪd)
n
(Animals) a member of the Teiidae family of lizards
adj
(Zoology) belonging to the Teiidae family of lizards
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.teiid - tropical New World lizard with a long tail and large rectangular scales on the belly and a long tail
lizard - relatively long-bodied reptile with usually two pairs of legs and a tapering tail
family Teiidae, Teiidae - whiptails; etc.
whiptail, whiptail lizard - any of numerous very agile and alert New World lizards
teju - large (to 3 feet) blackish yellow-banded South American lizard; raid henhouses; used as food
caiman lizard - crocodile-like lizard of South America having powerful jaws for crushing snails and mussels
References in periodicals archive ?
Review of Teiid Morphology with a Revised Taxonomy and Phylogeny of the Teiidae (Lepidosauria: Squamata).
A multivariate analysis of morphological variation among parthenogenetic teiid lizards of the Cnemidophorus cozumela complex.
Use of naturally and antropogenically disturbed habitats in Amazonian rainforest by the teiid lizard Ameiva ameiva.
Evolutionary and systematic implications of skin histocompatibility among parthenogenetic teiid lizards: Three color pattern classes of Aspidoscelis dixoni and one of Aspidoscelis tesselata.
Ameiva edracantha Bocourt, 1874, is a medium-sized teiid lizard (Jordan 2010) distributed in northwestern Peru and southwestern Ecuador.
A preliminary paper was provided on this matter (Cei, 2003), dealing with supraocular scales in species and genera of Iguania, as well as in some far-away taxonomic categories, such as Scleroglossa Teiid lizards.
occipitalis (burrowing owls and two species of diurnal snakes) feeding on Dicrodon guttulatum, a teiid lizard that is larger than large male M.