telegraph


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tel·e·graph

 (tĕl′ĭ-grăf′)
n.
1. A communications system that transmits and receives simple unmodulated electric impulses, especially one in which the transmission and reception stations are directly connected by wires.
2. A message transmitted by telegraph; a telegram.
v. tel·e·graphed, tel·e·graph·ing, tel·e·graphs
v.tr.
1. To transmit (a message) by telegraph.
2. To send or convey a message to (a recipient) by telegraph.
3.
a. To make known (a feeling or an attitude, for example) by nonverbal means: telegraphed her derision with a smirk.
b. To make known (an intended action, for example) in advance or unintentionally: By massing troops on the border, the enemy telegraphed its intended invasion to the target country.
v.intr.
To send or transmit a telegram.

te·leg′ra·pher (tə-lĕg′rə-fər), te·leg′ra·phist (-fĭst) n.

telegraph

(ˈtɛlɪˌɡræf; -ˌɡrɑːf)
n
1. (Telecommunications)
a. a device, system, or process by which information can be transmitted over a distance, esp using radio signals or coded electrical signals sent along a transmission line connected to a transmitting and a receiving instrument
b. (as modifier): telegraph pole.
2. (Telecommunications) a message transmitted by such a device, system, or process; telegram
vb
3. (Telecommunications) to send a telegram to (a person or place); wire
4. (Telecommunications) (tr) to transmit or send by telegraph
5. (Boxing) (tr) boxing informal to prepare to deliver (a punch) so obviously that one's opponent has ample time to avoid it
6. (tr) to give advance notice of (anything), esp unintentionally
7. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (tr) informal Canadian to cast (votes) illegally by impersonating registered voters
telegraphist, teˈlegrapher n

tel•e•graph

(ˈtɛl ɪˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf)

n.
1. a system or apparatus for transmitting messages or signals to a distant place, esp. between two electric devices connected by a conducting wire or other communications channel.
v.t.
2. to transmit (a message) by telegraph.
3. to send a message to (a person) by telegraph.
4. to divulge unwittingly (one's intention, next offensive move, etc.), as to an opponent or to an audience.
v.i.
5. to send a message by telegraph.
[< French télégraphe (1792) a kind of manual signaling device; see tele-1, -graph]
te•leg•ra•pher (təˈlɛg rə fər) ; esp. Brit., te•leg′ra•phist, n.

tel·e·graph

(tĕl′ĭ-grăf′)
A communications system in which a message in the form of electric impulses is sent, either by wire or radio, to a receiving station.

telegraph


Past participle: telegraphed
Gerund: telegraphing

Imperative
telegraph
telegraph
Present
I telegraph
you telegraph
he/she/it telegraphs
we telegraph
you telegraph
they telegraph
Preterite
I telegraphed
you telegraphed
he/she/it telegraphed
we telegraphed
you telegraphed
they telegraphed
Present Continuous
I am telegraphing
you are telegraphing
he/she/it is telegraphing
we are telegraphing
you are telegraphing
they are telegraphing
Present Perfect
I have telegraphed
you have telegraphed
he/she/it has telegraphed
we have telegraphed
you have telegraphed
they have telegraphed
Past Continuous
I was telegraphing
you were telegraphing
he/she/it was telegraphing
we were telegraphing
you were telegraphing
they were telegraphing
Past Perfect
I had telegraphed
you had telegraphed
he/she/it had telegraphed
we had telegraphed
you had telegraphed
they had telegraphed
Future
I will telegraph
you will telegraph
he/she/it will telegraph
we will telegraph
you will telegraph
they will telegraph
Future Perfect
I will have telegraphed
you will have telegraphed
he/she/it will have telegraphed
we will have telegraphed
you will have telegraphed
they will have telegraphed
Future Continuous
I will be telegraphing
you will be telegraphing
he/she/it will be telegraphing
we will be telegraphing
you will be telegraphing
they will be telegraphing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been telegraphing
you have been telegraphing
he/she/it has been telegraphing
we have been telegraphing
you have been telegraphing
they have been telegraphing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been telegraphing
you will have been telegraphing
he/she/it will have been telegraphing
we will have been telegraphing
you will have been telegraphing
they will have been telegraphing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been telegraphing
you had been telegraphing
he/she/it had been telegraphing
we had been telegraphing
you had been telegraphing
they had been telegraphing
Conditional
I would telegraph
you would telegraph
he/she/it would telegraph
we would telegraph
you would telegraph
they would telegraph
Past Conditional
I would have telegraphed
you would have telegraphed
he/she/it would have telegraphed
we would have telegraphed
you would have telegraphed
they would have telegraphed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.telegraph - apparatus used to communicate at a distance over a wire (usually in Morse code)telegraph - apparatus used to communicate at a distance over a wire (usually in Morse code)
apparatus, setup - equipment designed to serve a specific function
Verb1.telegraph - send cables, wires, or telegrams
telegraphy - communicating at a distance by electric transmission over wire
telecommunicate - communicate over long distances, as via the telephone or e-mail

telegraph

verb cable, wire (informal), transmit, telex, send He telegraphed me an urgent message.
Translations
تِلغراف: نِظام إرْسال البَرقِيّاتمِبْرَقَه، جِهاز إرْسال البَرْقِيّاتيُبْرِق، يُرْسِلُ بَرْقِيَّةًيُرْسِلُ بَرْقِيَّةً
telegraftelegrafovat
telegraftelegrafere
távírótávírókészülék
ritsímisenda símskeytisenda um ritsíma
nusiųsti telegrafupranešti telegrafutelegrafastelegrafavimastelegrafija
telegrafēttelegrafēt, sūtīt pa telegrāfutelegrāfs
telgraftelgraf çekmektelgrafla bildirmek

telegraph

[ˈtelɪgrɑːf]
A. N (= message) → telegrama m; (= apparatus) → aparato m telegráfico
B. VT, VItelegrafiar
C. CPD telegraph pole, telegraph post Nposte m telegráfico
telegraph wire Nhilo m telegráfico

telegraph

[ˈtɛligrɑːf]
ntélégraphe m
vttélégraphier
to telegraph sth to sb → télégraphier qch à qn

telegraph

n
(= apparatus)Telegraf m
(= message)Telegramm nt
vttelegrafisch übermitteln; message alsotelegrafieren; persontelegrafieren (+dat); (fig) one’s intentions, plans etcoffenlegen

telegraph

:
telegraph pole
n (Brit) → Telegrafenmast mor -stange f
telegraph wire
nTelegrafendraht mor -leitung f; (under ground) → Telegrafenkabel nt

telegraph

[ˈtɛlɪˌgrɑːf]
1. n (apparatus) → telegrafo; (message) → telegramma m
by telegraph → via telegrafo

telegraph

(ˈteligraːf) noun
1. a system of sending messages using either wires and electricity or radio. Send it by telegraph.
2. an instrument for this. Send the message on the telegraph.
verb
1. to send by telegraph. He telegraphed the time of his arrival.
2. to inform by telegraph. He telegraphed us to say when he would arrive.
teˈlegrapher (-ˈle-) , teˈlegraphist (-ˈle-) nouns
a person who operates a telegraph.
teˈlegraphy (-ˈle-) noun
the process, science or skill of sending messages by telegraph.
ˌteleˈgraphic (-ˈgrӕ-) adjective
telegraph pole
a high, wooden pole which supports telegraph wires.
References in classic literature ?
I see him bow and smile as he passes your window, but I didn't know you'd got up a telegraph.
If we had no trains, no mails, no telegraph, we would know that it rained over in Medina County.
I don't believe the telegraph there is work- ing," laughed Professor Bumper.
In half an hour there was a board meeting; later, he was to hold a post mortem on a railroad; at every moment questions were being asked by telegraph, by cable, questions that involved the credit of individuals, of firms, of even the country.
If you mean the telegraph," said the old gentleman, glancing his eye toward its wire, alongside the rail-track, "it is an excellent thing,--that is, of course, if the speculators in cotton and politics don't get possession of it.
Alive or dead a fish is technically fast, when it is connected with an occupied ship or boat, by any medium at all controllable by the occupant or occupants, -- a mast, an oar, a nine-inch cable, a telegraph wire, or a strand of cobweb, it is all the same.
The store- keepers plastered up their windows with all sorts of lies to entice you; the very fences by the wayside, the lampposts and telegraph poles, were pasted over with lies.
This was a telegraph and a telephone; our first venture in this line.
Similarly, during two or three hours of drawl, and the winnowing of many bushels of words, Madame Defarge's frequent expressions of impatience were taken up, with marvellous quickness, at a distance: the more readily, because certain men who had by some wonderful exercise of agility climbed up the external architecture to look in from the windows, knew Madame Defarge well, and acted as a telegraph between her and the crowd outside the building.
Dick utter on the subject; but he made a very telegraph of himself for the next half-hour (to the great disturbance of my aunt's mind), to enjoin inviolable secrecy on me.
All was wild and solitary, and one might have declared it a scene untrodden by the foot of man, but for the telegraph posts and small piles of broken "macadam" at punctual intervals, and the ginger-beer bottles and paper bags of local confectioners that lent an air of civilisation to the road.
You had better telegraph from the junction to the college; there must be a hue and cry out after us by this time.