telegraphy


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Related to telegraphy: Morse code, telegram, telephony

te·leg·ra·phy

 (tə-lĕg′rə-fē)
n.
Communication by means of the telegraph.

telegraphy

(tɪˈlɛɡrəfɪ)
n
1. (Telecommunications) a system of telecommunications involving any process providing reproduction at a distance of written, printed, or pictorial matter. See also facsimile2
2. (Telecommunications) the skill or process of operating a telegraph

te•leg•ra•phy

(təˈlɛg rə fi)

n.
the technique or practice of constructing or operating telegraphs.
[1785–95]

telegraphy

The invention of the electric telegraph, perfected in 1838 by Morse, saw the beginning of modern electronic communications. In simple terms, it is the transmission of written or printed messages by electrical signals.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.telegraphy - communicating at a distance by electric transmission over wiretelegraphy - communicating at a distance by electric transmission over wire
telecom, telecommunication - (often plural) systems used in transmitting messages over a distance electronically
cable, telegraph, wire - send cables, wires, or telegrams
2.telegraphy - apparatus used to communicate at a distance over a wire (usually in Morse code)telegraphy - apparatus used to communicate at a distance over a wire (usually in Morse code)
apparatus, setup - equipment designed to serve a specific function
Translations
إبْراق، إرْسال البَرْقِيّات
telegrafie
telegrafi
távírás
símritun
telegrafia
telgraf sistemi

telegraphy

[tɪˈlegrəfɪ] Ntelegrafía f

telegraphy

nTelegrafie f

telegraphy

[tɪˈlɛgrəfɪ] ntelegrafia

telegraph

(ˈteligraːf) noun
1. a system of sending messages using either wires and electricity or radio. Send it by telegraph.
2. an instrument for this. Send the message on the telegraph.
verb
1. to send by telegraph. He telegraphed the time of his arrival.
2. to inform by telegraph. He telegraphed us to say when he would arrive.
teˈlegrapher (-ˈle-) , teˈlegraphist (-ˈle-) nouns
a person who operates a telegraph.
teˈlegraphy (-ˈle-) noun
the process, science or skill of sending messages by telegraph.
ˌteleˈgraphic (-ˈgrӕ-) adjective
telegraph pole
a high, wooden pole which supports telegraph wires.
References in classic literature ?
That seemed a good idea; so the Historian rigged up a high tower in his back yard, and took lessons in wireless telegraphy until he understood it, and then began to call "Princess Dorothy of Oz" by sending messages into the air.
I'll show you, and I'll show you he's got a brain that counts to five an' knows wireless telegraphy.
He had been educated in Edinburgh, the city of his birth, and in London; and had in one way and another picked up a smattering of anatomy, music, electricity, and telegraphy.
As he was then in England, his first step was naturally to visit Sir Charles Wheatstone, the best known English expert on telegraphy.
In describing it to the officials of the Patent Office, he was obliged to call it "an improvement in telegraphy," when, in truth, it was nothing of the kind.
In this he was ably assisted by George Brown, an operator employed by the Wood's System of Wireless Telegraphy.
He is speculating in railways," said Lord Wilmore, "and as he is an expert chemist and physicist, he has invented a new system of telegraphy, which he is seeking to bring to perfection.
He knew, by the ancient telegraphy of smoke-signalling, the message was being conveyed from village to village and tribe to tribe that a labour-recruiter was on the leeward coast.
He has had wireless telegraphy installed; he has a telegraph office in the house, half-a-dozen private wires, and they say that he spends an immense amount of money keeping in touch with foreign politics.
A striking, and unfish-like feature was the apparatus for wireless telegraphy that dangled from the forward cabin--that is to say, under the chin of the fish.
Multiplex spiritual wireless telegraphy, I'd call it.
From two to five o'clock a species of labial telegraphy went on throughout the town; and all the inhabitants learned that Mademoiselle Cormon had at last found a husband by letter, and was about to marry the Vicomte de Troisville.