teleology


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tel·e·ol·o·gy

 (tĕl′ē-ŏl′ə-jē, tē′lē-)
n. pl. tel·e·ol·o·gies
1. The philosophical interpretation of natural phenomena as exhibiting purpose or design.
2. The use of ultimate purpose or design as a means of explaining phenomena.
3. Belief in or the perception of purposeful development toward an end, as in history.

[Greek teleios, teleos, perfect, complete (from telos, end, result; see kwel- in Indo-European roots) + -logy.]

tel′e·o·log′i·cal (-ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl), tel′e·o·log′ic (-ĭk) adj.
tel′e·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
tel′e·ol′o·gist n.

teleology

(ˌtɛlɪˈɒlədʒɪ; ˌtiːlɪ-)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the doctrine that there is evidence of purpose or design in the universe, and esp that this provides proof of the existence of a Designer
b. the belief that certain phenomena are best explained in terms of purpose rather than cause
c. the systematic study of such phenomena. See also final cause
2. (Philosophy) biology the belief that natural phenomena have a predetermined purpose and are not determined by mechanical laws
[C18: from New Latin teleologia, from Greek telos end + -logy]
teleological, ˌteleoˈlogic adj
ˌteleoˈlogically adv
ˌteleˈologism n
ˌteleˈologist n

tel•e•ol•o•gy

(ˌtɛl iˈɒl ə dʒi, ˌti li-)

n.
1. the doctrine that final causes exist.
2. the study of the evidences of design or purpose in nature.
3. such design or purpose.
4. the belief that purpose and design are a part of or are apparent in nature.
5. (in vitalist philosophy) the doctrine that phenomena are guided not only by mechanical forces but that they also move toward certain goals of self-realization.
[1730–40; < New Latin teleologia (1728); see teleo-]
tel`e•o•log′i•cal (-əˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) tel`e•o•log′ic, adj.
tel`e•o•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
tel`e•ol′o•gist, n.

teleology

- The study of design in nature; the word's basic meaning is "the study of ends or purposes"—attempts to understand the purpose of a natural occurrence by looking at its results.
See also related terms for purposes.

teleology

1. the doctrine that final causes (purposes) exist.
2. the study of the evidences of design or purpose in nature.
3. such a design or purpose.
4. the belief that purpose and design are a part of or apparent in nature.
5. Vitalism. the doctrine that phenomena are guided by both mechanical forces and goals of self-realization. Cf. entelechy.teleologist, n.teleologie, teleological, adj.
See also: Philosophy

teleology

The philosophical doctrine of final causes, or the interpretation of things in terms of purpose.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.teleology - (philosophy) a doctrine explaining phenomena by their ends or purposes
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Translations
teleologie

teleology

[ˌtelɪˈɒlədʒɪ] Nteleología f

teleology

nTeleologie f

teleology

[ˌtɛlɪˈɒlədʒɪ] nteleologia
References in periodicals archive ?
The companies include, Globacom Limited, Virgin Mobile, Helios Investment Partners LLP, MTN, Smile Telecoms Holdings, Blackstone Private Equity, Ntel, Vodacom, Teleology Holdings Limited, Obot Etiebet and Co, Bharti Airtel, BUA Group, Morning Side Capital Partners, and Hamilton and George International Limited but a number of them baulked when it was time to back the expression of interest with a bank guarantee of $100m.
Can we identify noteworthy trends in the contemporary world with power that we can harness without giving up on the idea of contingency and social creativity, asks Domingues, and use them to outline some future horizon, as classical theory intended to do, without relying on some form of teleology.
The classical problem of teleology in biology may be approached by a close examination of the mechanism behind the universal genotype-phenotype linkage: the protein synthesis or translation system.
In pursuit of these aims, Emden divides the book into three parts, one entitled "Varieties of Philosophical Naturalism," the second "Evolution and the Limits of Teleology," and the third, "Genealogy, Nature and Normativity.
The pieces in the first half of the book deal with proofs for the existence of God and topics closely tied to such proofs, such as motion and teleology.
Firstly, it is one of Johnson's goals to rewrite the history of the Mississippi without the teleology of an inexorable march towards the American Civil War.
frames his constructive theological contribution by proposing a teleology that encompasses multiple human values and goods: one that is profoundly embodied, aims at personal flourishing, is sensitive to human frailty, and is profoundly practical (49-50).
Readers of Conscience should be wary of the way in which Amerini transforms the step-by-step assertions of Aquinas' lowercase "t" teleology into Teleology with an uppercase "T"--the idea that treatment of the fetus at all stages should be based upon an unknowable future.
Finally, I will suggest that in order to give a complete account of the uniqueness of Peirce's philosophical project it is necessary to understand his teleology in relationship to his agapastic theory of evolution.
Anything less than teleology is bound to treat the mind as an accidental by-product of the struggle for survival.
Abstract: Simple mechanical systems involving feedback can easily manifest teleonomy, but it is still widely believed that there is no place for genuine teleology in metaphysical naturalism.
Drawing from Aristotle, Leeman describes teleology as a system of ethics that is integral to the essential nature of the matter at hand; achieving the telos, or ideal goal, is an endless process, for one can never fully attain it.