teleology


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tel·e·ol·o·gy

 (tĕl′ē-ŏl′ə-jē, tē′lē-)
n. pl. tel·e·ol·o·gies
1. The philosophical interpretation of natural phenomena as exhibiting purpose or design.
2. The use of ultimate purpose or design as a means of explaining phenomena.
3. Belief in or the perception of purposeful development toward an end, as in history.

[Greek teleios, teleos, perfect, complete (from telos, end, result; see kwel- in Indo-European roots) + -logy.]

tel′e·o·log′i·cal (-ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl), tel′e·o·log′ic (-ĭk) adj.
tel′e·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
tel′e·ol′o·gist n.

teleology

(ˌtɛlɪˈɒlədʒɪ; ˌtiːlɪ-)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the doctrine that there is evidence of purpose or design in the universe, and esp that this provides proof of the existence of a Designer
b. the belief that certain phenomena are best explained in terms of purpose rather than cause
c. the systematic study of such phenomena. See also final cause
2. (Philosophy) biology the belief that natural phenomena have a predetermined purpose and are not determined by mechanical laws
[C18: from New Latin teleologia, from Greek telos end + -logy]
teleological, ˌteleoˈlogic adj
ˌteleoˈlogically adv
ˌteleˈologism n
ˌteleˈologist n

tel•e•ol•o•gy

(ˌtɛl iˈɒl ə dʒi, ˌti li-)

n.
1. the doctrine that final causes exist.
2. the study of the evidences of design or purpose in nature.
3. such design or purpose.
4. the belief that purpose and design are a part of or are apparent in nature.
5. (in vitalist philosophy) the doctrine that phenomena are guided not only by mechanical forces but that they also move toward certain goals of self-realization.
[1730–40; < New Latin teleologia (1728); see teleo-]
tel`e•o•log′i•cal (-əˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) tel`e•o•log′ic, adj.
tel`e•o•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
tel`e•ol′o•gist, n.

teleology

- The study of design in nature; the word's basic meaning is "the study of ends or purposes"—attempts to understand the purpose of a natural occurrence by looking at its results.
See also related terms for purposes.

teleology

1. the doctrine that final causes (purposes) exist.
2. the study of the evidences of design or purpose in nature.
3. such a design or purpose.
4. the belief that purpose and design are a part of or apparent in nature.
5. Vitalism. the doctrine that phenomena are guided by both mechanical forces and goals of self-realization. Cf. entelechy.teleologist, n.teleologie, teleological, adj.
See also: Philosophy

teleology

The philosophical doctrine of final causes, or the interpretation of things in terms of purpose.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.teleology - (philosophy) a doctrine explaining phenomena by their ends or purposes
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Translations
teleologie

teleology

[ˌtelɪˈɒlədʒɪ] Nteleología f

teleology

nTeleologie f

teleology

[ˌtɛlɪˈɒlədʒɪ] nteleologia
References in periodicals archive ?
1328) seeks to understand the great mystic's thought as an extended critique of Aristotelian-Thomistic teleology and eudaimonism.
Few, if any, still unreservedly embrace the inevitable teleology of capitalist development, the primacy of purely materialist analysis, or the falling rate of profit and the ineluctable demise of capitalism itself.
frames his constructive theological contribution by proposing a teleology that encompasses multiple human values and goods: one that is profoundly embodied, aims at personal flourishing, is sensitive to human frailty, and is profoundly practical (49-50).
Readers of Conscience should be wary of the way in which Amerini transforms the step-by-step assertions of Aquinas' lowercase "t" teleology into Teleology with an uppercase "T"--the idea that treatment of the fetus at all stages should be based upon an unknowable future.
In the teleology that Feerick outlines, more familiar modern racial ideologies erupt and eventually displace the race-as-blood model.
Anything less than teleology is bound to treat the mind as an accidental by-product of the struggle for survival.
Drawing from Aristotle, Leeman describes teleology as a system of ethics that is integral to the essential nature of the matter at hand; achieving the telos, or ideal goal, is an endless process, for one can never fully attain it.
Gotthelf believes that one of his most important contributions to Aristotelian studies lies in his account of teleology in the biological writings.
He practices neither a teleology of the sequence nor a reverse teleology of destruction.
Sometimes the discovery of sexuality is presented as a fortuitous occurrence, an account that stresses the teleology of nature, and of genitalia.
Instead, I suggest the travelers in Rasselas move from Aristotelian teleology--where the end or telos is happiness found in philosophical contemplation or theoria--to Thomistic teleology, where telos is happiness found in God.
She sketches those buried secrets with the lightest of touches, playing suavely as she does so upon notions of novelistic teleology and readerly anticipation.