telescope


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tel·e·scope

 (tĕl′ĭ-skōp′)
n.
1. An arrangement of lenses or mirrors or both that gathers light, permitting direct observation or photographic recording of distant objects.
2. Any of various devices, such as a radio telescope, used to detect and observe distant objects by their emission, absorption, or reflection of electromagnetic radiation.
v. tel·e·scoped, tel·e·scop·ing, tel·e·scopes
v.tr.
1. To cause to slide inward or outward in overlapping sections, as the cylindrical sections of a small hand telescope do.
2. To make more compact or concise; condense.
v.intr.
To slide inward or outward in or as if in overlapping cylindrical sections: a camp bucket that telescopes into a disk.

[New Latin telescopium or Italian telescopio, both from Greek tēleskopos, far-seeing : tēle-, tele- + skopos, watcher; see spek- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

telescope

(ˈtɛlɪˌskəʊp)
n
1. (Astronomy) an optical instrument for making distant objects appear larger and brighter by use of a combination of lenses (refracting telescope) or lenses and curved mirrors (reflecting telescope). See also terrestrial telescope, astronomical telescope, Cassegrain telescope, Galilean telescope, Newtonian telescope
2. (Astronomy) any instrument, such as a radio telescope, for collecting, focusing, and detecting electromagnetic radiation from space
vb
3. to crush together or be crushed together, as in a collision: the front of the car was telescoped by the impact.
4. to fit together like a set of cylinders that slide into one another, thus allowing extension and shortening
5. to make or become smaller or shorter: the novel was telescoped into a short play.
[C17: from Italian telescopio or New Latin telescopium, literally: far-seeing instrument; see tele-, -scope]

tel•e•scope

(ˈtɛl əˌskoʊp)

n., adj., v. -scoped, -scop•ing. n.
1. an optical instrument for making distant objects appear larger and nearer when viewed directly through lenses (refracting telescope) or indirectly as through images focused by a concave mirror (reflecting telescope).
adj.
2. consisting of parts that slide one within another.
v.t.
3. to force together, one into another, in the manner of the sliding tubes of a jointed telescope.
4. to shorten or condense.
v.i.
5. to slide together in the manner of the tubes of a telescope.
6. to be driven one into another, as railroad cars in a collision.
7. to become condensed.
[1640–50; < New Latin telescopium or Italian telescopio]
click for a larger image
telescope
In a reflecting telescope (left), light is gathered by reflecting off a concave mirror. It is then reflected off an angled flat mirror toward the eyepiece. In a refracting telescope (right), light is gathered by being refracted through a convex objective lens. It then exits in a direct line through the eyepiece.

tel·e·scope

(tĕl′ĭ-skōp′)
1. An arrangement of lenses, mirrors, or both that collects visible light, allowing direct observation or photographic recording of distant objects.
2. Any of various devices, such as a radio telescope, used to detect and observe distant objects by collecting radiation other than visible light.

telescope


Past participle: telescoped
Gerund: telescoping

Imperative
telescope
telescope
Present
I telescope
you telescope
he/she/it telescopes
we telescope
you telescope
they telescope
Preterite
I telescoped
you telescoped
he/she/it telescoped
we telescoped
you telescoped
they telescoped
Present Continuous
I am telescoping
you are telescoping
he/she/it is telescoping
we are telescoping
you are telescoping
they are telescoping
Present Perfect
I have telescoped
you have telescoped
he/she/it has telescoped
we have telescoped
you have telescoped
they have telescoped
Past Continuous
I was telescoping
you were telescoping
he/she/it was telescoping
we were telescoping
you were telescoping
they were telescoping
Past Perfect
I had telescoped
you had telescoped
he/she/it had telescoped
we had telescoped
you had telescoped
they had telescoped
Future
I will telescope
you will telescope
he/she/it will telescope
we will telescope
you will telescope
they will telescope
Future Perfect
I will have telescoped
you will have telescoped
he/she/it will have telescoped
we will have telescoped
you will have telescoped
they will have telescoped
Future Continuous
I will be telescoping
you will be telescoping
he/she/it will be telescoping
we will be telescoping
you will be telescoping
they will be telescoping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been telescoping
you have been telescoping
he/she/it has been telescoping
we have been telescoping
you have been telescoping
they have been telescoping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been telescoping
you will have been telescoping
he/she/it will have been telescoping
we will have been telescoping
you will have been telescoping
they will have been telescoping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been telescoping
you had been telescoping
he/she/it had been telescoping
we had been telescoping
you had been telescoping
they had been telescoping
Conditional
I would telescope
you would telescope
he/she/it would telescope
we would telescope
you would telescope
they would telescope
Past Conditional
I would have telescoped
you would have telescoped
he/she/it would have telescoped
we would have telescoped
you would have telescoped
they would have telescoped
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.telescope - a magnifier of images of distant objectstelescope - a magnifier of images of distant objects
aperture - a device that controls amount of light admitted
astronomical telescope - any telescope designed to collect and record electromagnetic radiation from cosmic sources
collimator - a small telescope attached to a large telescope to use in setting the line of the larger one
equatorial - a telescope whose mounting has only two axes of motion, one parallel to the Earth's axis and the other one at right angles to it
view finder, viewfinder, finder - optical device that helps a user to find the target of interest
magnifier - a scientific instrument that magnifies an image
optical prism, prism - optical device having a triangular shape and made of glass or quartz; used to deviate a beam or invert an image
solar telescope - a telescope designed to make observations of the sun
transit instrument - a telescope mounted on an axis running east and west and used to time the transit of a celestial body across the meridian
Verb1.telescope - crush together or collapse; "In the accident, the cars telescoped"; "my hiking sticks telescope and can be put into the backpack"
mash, squash, squeeze, crush, squelch - to compress with violence, out of natural shape or condition; "crush an aluminum can"; "squeeze a lemon"
2.telescope - make smaller or shorter; "the novel was telescoped into a short play"
condense, concentrate, digest - make more concise; "condense the contents of a book into a summary"

telescope

noun
1. glass, scope (informal), spyglass The telescope enables us to see deeper into the universe than ever.
Translations
تلسكوب: مِنْظار فَلَكي، مِرْقابتليسكوبيَتَداخَل، يَتَصادَم
телескоп
dalekohledvklínit se
teleskopkikkert
kaukoputki
teleskop
egymásba fúródikegymásba tolteleszkóp
teleskop
ganga hver inn í annan, òjappa samansjónauki
望遠鏡
망원경
susistumtisustumiamassustumtiteleskopasteleskopinis
ietriektsabīdītsastumtteleskops
ďalekohľadteleskopvkliniť sa
daljnogledteleskop
teleskop
กล้องส่องทางไกล
teleskopbirbirine/içiçe geçmek
телескоп
kính viễn vọng

telescope

[ˈtelɪskəʊp]
A. Ntelescopio m
B. VI [aerial, umbrella] → plegarse
C. VTabatir, plegar
to telescope A into Bmeter A dentro de B

telescope

[ˈtɛlɪskəʊp]
ntélescope m
vttélescoper

telescope

nTeleskop nt, → Fernrohr nt
vi (also telescope together, train carriages) → sich ineinanderschieben; (aerial, umbrella)sich ineinanderschieben lassen
vt (also telescope together)ineinanderschieben; umbrella, aerialzusammenschieben; (fig)komprimieren

telescope

[ˈtɛlɪˌskəʊp]
1. ntelescopio
2. vichiudersi a telescopio (fig) (vehicles) → accartocciarsi

telescope

(ˈteliskəup) noun
a kind of tube containing lenses through which distant objects appear closer. He looked at the ship through his telescope.
verb
to push or be pushed together so that one part slides inside another, like the parts of a closing telescope. The crash telescoped the railway coaches.
ˌteleˈscopic (-ˈsko-) adjective
1. of, like, or containing, a telescope. a telescopic sight on a rifle.
2. made in parts which can slide inside each other. a telescopic radio aerial.
teletext (ˈteliˌtekst) noun
a system of TV broadcasts of text only, providing all sorts of information eg weather forecasts, train timetables, news reports, jokes and lottery results.

telescope

تليسكوب dalekohled teleskop Teleskop τηλεσκόπιο telescopio kaukoputki télescope teleskop telescopio 望遠鏡 망원경 telescoop teleskop teleskop telescópio телескоп teleskop กล้องส่องทางไกล teleskop kính viễn vọng 望远镜
References in classic literature ?
In front is a leather rack, in which to keep your speaking trumpet, pipe, telescope, and other nautical conveniences.
A telescope stood in the yard, with its huge barrel canted up toward the lustrous evening star.
I was all tuckered out tryin' to mislead 'em and deceive 'em and sidetrack 'em; but the minute I got where I wa'n't put under a microscope by day an' a telescope by night and had myself TO myself without sayin' `By your leave,' I begun to pick up.
We walked about on the cliff after that, and sat on the grass, and looked at things through a telescope - I could make out nothing myself when it was put to my eye, but I pretended I could - and then we came back to the hotel to an early dinner.
In this strain of consolation, Herbert informed me the invisible Barley would commune with himself by the day and night together; often while it was light, having, at the same time, one eye at a telescope which was fitted on his bed for the convenience of sweeping the river.
said Alice; `I must be shutting up like a telescope.
The last words were shrieked as he was being swung through the air, but Rann nodded and rose up till he looked no bigger than a speck of dust, and there he hung, watching with his telescope eyes the swaying of the treetops as Mowgli's escort whirled along.
As well might you propose to put a telescope into a steel-mill or to hitch a balloon to a shoe- factory.
WE will not follow all the steps of the Admiral's return and installation, but hurry forward towards the catastrophe, merely chronicling by the way a few salient incidents, wherein we must rely entirely upon the evidence of Richard, for Esther to this day has never opened her mouth upon this trying passage of her life, and as for the Admiral - well, that naval officer, although still alive, and now more suitably installed in a seaport town where he has a telescope and a flag in his front garden, is incapable of throwing the slightest gleam of light upon the affair.
I felt very much puzzled, and descended to the drawing-room, and took out an excellent telescope that I generally used.
It was as if it quivered, but really this was the telescope vibrating with the activity of the clockwork that kept the planet in view.
Franz adjusted his telescope, and directed it towards the yacht.