telltale


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tell·tale

 (tĕl′tāl′)
n.
1. One who informs on another; a talebearer.
2. Something that indicates or reveals information; a sign.
3. Any of various devices that indicate or register information, especially:
a. A time clock.
b. Nautical A length of yarn or ribbon attached to a shroud, stay, or sail of a sailboat, as to indicate the direction of the wind or the strength of the flow of air over the sail.
c. A row of strips hung above a railroad track to warn a passing train of low clearance ahead.
4. Sports A resonant metal strip, 24 or 30 inches (61 or 76 centimeters) high, across the bottom of the front wall of a racquets or squash court above which the ball must be hit.

telltale

(ˈtɛlˌteɪl)
n
1. a person who tells tales about others
2.
a. an outward indication of something concealed
b. (as modifier): a telltale paw mark.
3. (Mechanical Engineering) any of various indicators or recording devices used to monitor a process, machine, etc
4. (Nautical Terms) nautical
a. another word for dogvane
b. one of a pair of light vanes mounted on the main shrouds of a sailing boat to indicate the apparent direction of the wind

tell•tale

(ˈtɛlˌteɪl)

n.
1. a person who reveals confidential matters.
2. a thing serving to reveal something.
3. any of various devices for indicating or registering, as a time clock.
4. a row of strips hung over a track to warn crew members on freight trains that a low bridge or tunnel is approaching.
5. (on a sailboat) a string or ribbon hung aloft to indicate the direction of the wind.
adj.
6. revealing what is not intended to be known: a telltale blush.
7. giving notice or warning of something, as a mechanical device.
[1540–50]

telltale

tattletale
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.telltale - someone who gossips indiscreetlytelltale - someone who gossips indiscreetly  
gossiper, gossipmonger, newsmonger, rumormonger, rumourmonger, gossip - a person given to gossiping and divulging personal information about others
Adj.1.telltale - disclosing unintentionally; "a telling smile"; "a telltale panel of lights"; "a telltale patch of oil on the water marked where the boat went down"
informatory, informative - providing or conveying information

telltale

adjective
1. revealing, significant, meaningful, giveaway (informal), unmistakable, suggestive, revelatory the telltale redness around his eyes
noun
1. blabbermouth (informal), sneak (Brit. informal), squealer (informal), snitch (informal), tattletale (U.S. informal), clype (Scot. informal) I didn't want to be a telltale so I kept quiet.

telltale

noun
A person habitually engaged in idle talk about others:
Slang: yenta.
Translations
ناقِل مَعْلومات أو إشاعات
prozrazující
árulkodó
sem kemur upp um/ljóstrar upp
prezrádzajúci
açığa vuranele veren

telltale

[ˈtelteɪl]
A. ADJ [sign] → revelador, indicador
B. N
1. (= person) → soplón/ona m/f
2. (Naut) → catavientos m inv

telltale

n
(Brit) → Petzer m, → Petze f
(Tech) → Kontrolllicht nt, → Kontrolllampe f
adj attrverräterisch

telltale

[ˈtɛlˌteɪl]
1. adj (sign) → rivelatore/trice
2. n (fam, pej) (person) → spione/a, pettegolo/a

tell

(tel) past tense, past participle told (tould) verb
1. to inform or give information to (a person) about (something). He told the whole story to John; He told John about it.
2. to order or command; to suggest or warn. I told him to go away.
3. to say or express in words. to tell lies / the truth / a story.
4. to distinguish; to see (a difference); to know or decide. Can you tell the difference between them?; I can't tell one from the other; You can tell if the meat is cooked by/from the colour.
5. to give away a secret. You mustn't tell or we'll get into trouble.
6. to be effective; to be seen to give (good) results. Good teaching will always tell.
ˈteller noun
1. a person who receives or pays out money over the counter at a bank.
2. a person who tells (stories). a story-teller.
ˈtelling adjective
having a great effect. a telling argument.
ˈtellingly adverb
ˈtelltale adjective
giving information (often which a person would not wish to be known). the telltale signs of guilt.
I told you so
I told or warned you that this would happen, had happened etc, and I was right. `I told you so, but you wouldn't believe me.
tell off to scold: The teacher used to tell me off for not doing my homework ( ˌtelling-ˈoff: He gave me a good telling-off) noun
tell on
1. to have a bad effect on. Smoking began to tell on his health.
2. to give information about (a person, usually if they are doing something wrong). I'm late for work – don't tell on me!
tell tales
to give away secret or private information about the (usually wrong) actions of others. You must never tell tales.
tell the time
to (be able to) know what time it is by looking at a clock etc or by any other means. He can tell the time from the position of the sun; Could you tell me the time, please?
there's no telling
it is impossible to know. There's no telling what he'll do!
you never can tell
it is possible. It might rain – you never can tell.
References in classic literature ?
Brooke, getting a trifle confused as his eyes went from one telltale face to the other.
Remember, Duncan, how necessary your safety is to our own - - how you bear a father's sacred trust--how much depends on your discretion and care--in short," she added, while the telltale blood stole over her features, crimsoning her very temples, "how very deservedly dear you are to all of the name of Munro.
But at last the roar of a bigger and nearer break than usual brought her out of her torpor, and she looked up, and her practiced eye fell upon that telltale rush of water.
The handle of the telltale tea- spoon was visible under the bed-valance.
But her telltale eyes were red and glanced at me from between swollen lids.
In his haste he had dropped several garments upon the floor, and the telltale fur that had fallen partly within the corridor had proved the means of guiding me to the very spot he would least have wished me to have knowledge of.
He listened for the puff of a motor or some other telltale sound that would prove the correctness of his theory.
In it Polly saw a pair of telltale eyes looking out from a tangle of bright brown hair, cheeks that flushed and dimpled suddenly as the fresh mouth smiled with an expression of conscious power, half proud, half ashamed, and as pretty to see as the coquettish gesture with which she smoothed back her curls and flourished a white hand.
It was hardly needful for Katy to answer with her lips a question to which her telltale cheeks had made instant reply.
I'm no telltale, Anne Shirley, and anyhow I was just as much to blame as you.
They were small, stocky horses, but the telltale saddle galls proclaimed their calling.
Into this place Soapy took his accusive shoes and telltale trousers without challenge.