temper


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tem·per

 (tĕm′pər)
v. tem·pered, tem·per·ing, tem·pers
v.tr.
1. To modify by the addition of a moderating element; moderate: "temper its doctrinaire logic with a little practical wisdom" (Robert H. Jackson). See Synonyms at moderate.
2. To bring to a desired consistency, texture, hardness, or other physical condition by blending, admixing, or kneading: temper clay; paints that had been tempered with oil.
3. To harden or strengthen (metal or glass) by application of heat or by heating and cooling.
4. To strengthen through experience or hardship; toughen: soldiers who had been tempered by combat.
5. Music To adjust (the pitch of an instrument) to a temperament.
v.intr.
To be or become tempered.
n.
1. A state of mind or emotion; disposition: an even temper.
2. Calmness of mind or emotions; composure: lose one's temper.
3.
a. A tendency to become easily angry or irritable: a quick temper.
b. Anger; rage: a fit of temper.
4. A characteristic general quality; tone: heroes who exemplified the medieval temper; the politicized temper of the 1930s.
5.
a. The condition of being tempered.
b. The degree of hardness and elasticity of a metal, chiefly steel, achieved by tempering.
6. A modifying substance or agent added to something else.
7. Archaic A middle course between extremes; a mean.

[Middle English temperen, from Old English temprian, from Latin temperāre, probably from variant of tempus, tempor-, time, season.]

tem′per·a·bil′i·ty n.
tem′per·a·ble adj.
tem′per·er n.

temper

(ˈtɛmpə)
n
1. a frame of mind; mood or humour: a good temper.
2. a sudden outburst of anger; tantrum
3. a tendency to exhibit uncontrolled anger; irritability
4. a mental condition of moderation and calm (esp in the phrases keep one's temper, lose one's temper, out of temper)
5. (Metallurgy) the degree of hardness, elasticity, or a similar property of a metal or metal object
vb (tr)
6. to make more temperate, acceptable, or suitable by adding something else; moderate: he tempered his criticism with kindly sympathy.
7. (Metallurgy) to strengthen or toughen (a metal or metal article) by heat treatment, as by heating and quenching
8. (Music, other) music
a. to adjust the frequency differences between the notes of a scale on (a keyboard instrument) in order to allow modulation into other keys
b. to make such an adjustment to the pitches of notes in (a scale)
9. a rare word for adapt
10. an archaic word for mix
[Old English temprian to mingle, (influenced by Old French temprer), from Latin temperāre to mix, probably from tempus time]
ˈtemperable adj
ˌtemperaˈbility n
ˈtemperer n

tem•per

(ˈtɛm pər)

n.
1. a particular state of mind or feelings.
2. habit of mind, esp. with respect to irritability or patience; disposition: an even temper.
3. heat of mind or passion, shown in outbursts of anger, resentment, etc.
4. calm disposition; composure: to lose one's temper.
5. a substance added to modify other properties.
6.
a. the degree of hardness and strength imparted to a metal, as by quenching or treatment with heat.
b. the operation of tempering metal.
7. Archaic. a middle course; compromise.
8. Obs. the character of a substance.
v.t.
9. to moderate: to temper justice with mercy.
10. to soften or tone down.
11. to make suitable by or as if by blending.
12. to work into proper consistency, as clay or mortar.
13. to impart strength or toughness to (steel or cast iron) by heating and cooling.
14. to tune (a keyboard instrument) so as to make the tones available in different keys or tonalities.
15. Archaic. to blend in due proportions.
16. Archaic. to pacify.
v.i.
17. to be or become tempered.
[before 1000; Middle English tempren, Old English temprian < Latin temperāre to restrain oneself, adjust, temper]
tem′per•a•ble, adj.
tem′per•er, n.

temper

  • acerbic - Often describes a sharp or biting mood, temper, tone, or wit; acerbity is normally a bit less sharp than sarcasm.
  • tirret - An outburst of temper.
  • mansuetude - Tameness or sweetness of temper.
  • tamper - First meant "to work in clay" or "temper in clay."

temper


Past participle: tempered
Gerund: tempering

Imperative
temper
temper
Present
I temper
you temper
he/she/it tempers
we temper
you temper
they temper
Preterite
I tempered
you tempered
he/she/it tempered
we tempered
you tempered
they tempered
Present Continuous
I am tempering
you are tempering
he/she/it is tempering
we are tempering
you are tempering
they are tempering
Present Perfect
I have tempered
you have tempered
he/she/it has tempered
we have tempered
you have tempered
they have tempered
Past Continuous
I was tempering
you were tempering
he/she/it was tempering
we were tempering
you were tempering
they were tempering
Past Perfect
I had tempered
you had tempered
he/she/it had tempered
we had tempered
you had tempered
they had tempered
Future
I will temper
you will temper
he/she/it will temper
we will temper
you will temper
they will temper
Future Perfect
I will have tempered
you will have tempered
he/she/it will have tempered
we will have tempered
you will have tempered
they will have tempered
Future Continuous
I will be tempering
you will be tempering
he/she/it will be tempering
we will be tempering
you will be tempering
they will be tempering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been tempering
you have been tempering
he/she/it has been tempering
we have been tempering
you have been tempering
they have been tempering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been tempering
you will have been tempering
he/she/it will have been tempering
we will have been tempering
you will have been tempering
they will have been tempering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been tempering
you had been tempering
he/she/it had been tempering
we had been tempering
you had been tempering
they had been tempering
Conditional
I would temper
you would temper
he/she/it would temper
we would temper
you would temper
they would temper
Past Conditional
I would have tempered
you would have tempered
he/she/it would have tempered
we would have tempered
you would have tempered
they would have tempered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.temper - a sudden outburst of angertemper - a sudden outburst of anger; "his temper sparked like damp firewood"
vexation, annoyance, chafe - anger produced by some annoying irritation
2.temper - a characteristic (habitual or relatively temporary) state of feelingtemper - a characteristic (habitual or relatively temporary) state of feeling; "whether he praised or cursed me depended on his temper at the time"; "he was in a bad humor"
feeling - the experiencing of affective and emotional states; "she had a feeling of euphoria"; "he had terrible feelings of guilt"; "I disliked him and the feeling was mutual"
peeve - an annoyed or irritated mood
sulk, sulkiness - a mood or display of sullen aloofness or withdrawal; "stayed home in a sulk"
amiability, good humor, good humour, good temper - a cheerful and agreeable mood
ill humor, ill humour, distemper - an angry and disagreeable mood
3.temper - a disposition to exhibit uncontrolled angertemper - a disposition to exhibit uncontrolled anger; "his temper was well known to all his employees"
ill nature - a disagreeable, irritable, or malevolent disposition
querulousness - the quality of being given to complaining
4.temper - the elasticity and hardness of a metal objecttemper - the elasticity and hardness of a metal object; its ability to absorb considerable energy before cracking
elasticity, snap - the tendency of a body to return to its original shape after it has been stretched or compressed; "the waistband had lost its snap"
Verb1.temper - bring to a desired consistency, texture, or hardness by a process of gradually heating and coolingtemper - bring to a desired consistency, texture, or hardness by a process of gradually heating and cooling; "temper glass"
harden, indurate - make hard or harder; "The cold hardened the butter"
2.temper - harden by reheating and cooling in oil; "temper steel"
modify - make less severe or harsh or extreme; "please modify this letter to make it more polite"; "he modified his views on same-gender marriage"
3.temper - adjust the pitch (of pianos)
adjust, correct, set - alter or regulate so as to achieve accuracy or conform to a standard; "Adjust the clock, please"; "correct the alignment of the front wheels"
4.temper - make more temperate, acceptable, or suitable by adding something elsetemper - make more temperate, acceptable, or suitable by adding something else; moderate; "she tempered her criticism"
weaken - lessen the strength of; "The fever weakened his body"
5.temper - restrain
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"

temper

noun
3. rage, fury, bad mood, passion, paddy (Brit. informal), wax (informal, chiefly Brit.), tantrum, bate (Brit. slang), fit of pique She was still in a temper when I arrived.
4. self-control, composure, cool (slang), calm, good humour, tranquillity, coolness, calmness, equanimity I've never seen him lose his temper.
self-control anger, fury, wrath, irritation, indignation, agitation, pique, bad mood, excitability, vexation, grumpiness, irascibility, foul humour
verb
1. moderate, restrain, tone down, calm, soften, soothe, lessen, allay, mitigate, abate, assuage, mollify, soft-pedal (informal), palliate, admix He had to learn to temper his enthusiasm.
moderate intensify, arouse, heighten, excite, stir, provoke, aggravate
2. strengthen, harden, toughen, anneal a new way of tempering glass
strengthen soften

temper

verb
To make or become less severe or extreme:
noun
1. A person's customary manner of emotional response:
2. A temporary state of mind or feeling:
frame of mind, humor, mood, spirit (used in plural), vein.
3. A tendency to become angry or irritable:
Informal: dander.
Slang: short fuse.
Idiom: low boiling point.
4. An angry outburst:
5. A prevailing quality, as of thought, behavior, or attitude:
Translations
حالَة غَضَبحِدَّة إنْفِعال، مِزاج حادمِزاجمِزَاجيُلَطِّف، يُخَفِّف من، يُسَكِّن
kalitmírnitnáladapopouštětpovaha
temperamentvredhærdehumørmildne
kiukku
ćud
temperál
mildaskapstyrkja, bætavont skap
かんしゃく
būdocharakteriogrūdintivaldyti save
dabadusmasgarastāvoklismazinātmīkstināt
kaliť
jezarazpoloženje
humör
อารมณ์โกรธ
hafifletmekhuykeyifkızgınlıköfke
cơn giận

temper

[ˈtempəʳ]
A. N
1. (= nature) → carácter m, genio m; (= mood) → humor m
to be in a temperestar furioso
to be in a good/bad temperestar de buen/mal humor
to keep one's temperno perder la calma, contenerse
to lose one's temperperder los estribos
to have a quick tempertener genio
in a fit of temperen un acceso de furia or ira
to fly into a temperponerse furioso, montar en cólera
mind your temper!; temper, temper!¡contrólate or controla ese genio!
2. [of metal] → temple m
B. VT
1. (= moderate) [+ remarks] → suavizar, atenuar; [+ energy, enthusiasm] → atemperar
to temper justice with mercytemplar la justicia con la compasión
2. (= soften) [+ metal] → templar

temper

[ˈtɛmpər]
n
(= tendency to become angry)
I hope he can control his temper → J'espère qu'il pourra contrôler ses humeurs.
to have a temper → se mettre facilement en colère
He's got a terrible temper → Il se met très facilement en colère.
to have a short temper → se mettre très facilement en colère
to keep one's temper → rester calme, garder son calme
to lose one's temper → se mettre en colère
I lost my temper → Je me suis mis en colère.
(= fit of anger) → colère f
to be in a temper → être en colère
(= mood) → humeur f
to be in a good temper → être de bonne humeur
to be in a bad temper → être de mauvaise humeur
(= nature) → caractère m
vt (= moderate) → tempérer

temper

n
(= disposition)Wesen nt, → Naturell nt; (= angry mood)Wut f; temper tantrumWutanfall m; to be in a temperwütend sein; to be in a good/bad temperguter/schlechter Laune sein; he was not in the best of temperser war nicht gerade bester Laune; she’s got a quick tempersie kann sehr jähzornig sein; she’s got a terrible/foul/vicious tempersie kann sehr unangenehm/ausfallend/tückisch werden; what a temper that child has!was dieses Kind für Wutanfälle hat!; to be in a (bad) temper with somebody/over or about somethingauf jdn/wegen einer Sache (gen)wütend sein; to lose one’s temperdie Beherrschung verlieren (with sb bei jdm); to keep one’s tempersich beherrschen (with sb bei jdm); temper, temper!aber, aber, wer wird denn gleich so zornig werden!; to fly into a tempereinen Wutanfall bekommen, in die Luft gehen (inf); a fit of temperein Wutanfall m; to put somebody in a temper, to get somebody’s temper upjdn zur Weißglut bringen, jdn wütend machen; he has quite a temperer kann ziemlich aufbrausen; to be out of temper (old)verstimmt sein, übel gelaunt sein; I hope he can control his temperich hoffe, er kann sich unter Kontrolle halten
(of metal)Härte f, → Härtegrad m
vt
metaltempern
(old Mus) → temperieren (old)
(fig) action, passionmäßigen; criticismmildern; enthusiasmzügeln; to temper justice with mercybei aller Gerechtigkeit Milde walten lassen; to be tempered by concern/realismmit Fürsorge/Realismus vermischt sein

temper

[ˈtɛmpəʳ]
1. n (nature) → temperamento, carattere m, indole f; (mood) → umore m; (fit of anger) → collera
she has a sweet temper → è dolce per temperamento or di indole
to be in a temper → essere in collera
to be in a good/bad temper → essere di buon/cattivo umore
to keep one's temper → restare calmo/a
to lose one's temper → perdere le staffe, andare in collera
in a fit of temper → in un accesso d'ira
to fly into a temper → andare su tutte le furie
mind your temper!, temper, temper! → cerca di controllarti!, calma, calma!
2. vt (moderate) → moderare; (soften, metal) → temprare

temper

(ˈtempə) noun
1. a state of mind; a mood or humour. He's in a bad temper.
2. a tendency to become (unpleasant when) angry. He has a terrible temper.
3. a state of anger. She's in a temper.
verb
1. to bring metal to the right degree of hardness by heating and cooling. The steel must be carefully tempered.
2. to soften or make less severe. One must try to temper justice with mercy.
-tempered
having a (certain) state of mind. good-tempered; mean-tempered; sweet-tempered.
keep one's temper
not to lose one's temper. He was very annoyed but he kept his temper.
lose one's temper
to show anger. He lost his temper and shouted at me.

temper

مِزَاج prudká povaha temperament Wut ιδιοσυγκρασία humor kiukku caractère ćud temperamento かんしゃく temperament temperament usposobienie temperamento нрав humör อารมณ์โกรธ öfke patlaması cơn giận 脾气

tem·per

n. carácter, disposición; temple, humor; genio;
v.
to have bad ___tener mal ___;
to have good ___tener buen ___.
References in classic literature ?
I'll try and be what he loves to call me, `a little woman' and not be rough and wild, but do my duty here instead of wanting to be somewhere else," said Jo, thinking that keeping her temper at home was a much harder task than facing a rebel or two down South.
From childhood she had been inclined to fits of temper and when not angry she was often morose and si- lent.
He could scarcely read, wrote even his name with difficulty, and he had a violent temper which sometimes made him behave like a crazy man--tore him all to pieces and actually made him ill.
Victor was the younger son and brother--a tete montee, with a temper which invited violence and a will which no ax could break.
All that pertained to nature was sweet, or simply grand; while those parts which depended on the temper and movements of man were lively and playful.
The partners themselves were uncommunicative; even Whiskey Dick, who since his remarkable social elevation had become less oracular, much to his own astonishment, contributed nothing to the gossip except a suggestion that as the fiery temper of George Kearney brooked no opposition, even from his brother, it was better they should separate before the estrangement became serious.
She scowls dreadfully, reason or none, out of pure ugliness of temper.
With the customary infirmity of temper that characterizes this unhappy fowl, she appears by the fierceness of her beak and eye, and the general truculency of her attitude, to threaten mischief to the inoffensive community; and especially to warn all citizens careful of their safety against intruding on the premises which she overshadows with her wings.
At last the shank, in one complete rod, received its final heat; and as perth, to temper it, plunged it all hissing into the cask of water near by, the scalding steam shot up into Ahab's bent face.
You have been well-bred and well-born; your father has a great name in these parts, and your grandfather won the cup two years at the Newmarket races; your grandmother had the sweetest temper of any horse I ever knew, and I think you have never seen me kick or bite.
He had received a good education, but, on succeeding early in life to a small independence, had become indisposed for any of the more homely pursuits in which his brothers were engaged, and had satisfied an active, cheerful mind and social temper by entering into the militia of his county, then embodied.
She flew along the corridor and the nearer she got to the screams the higher her temper mounted.