temperament


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tem·per·a·ment

 (tĕm′prə-mənt, tĕm′pər-ə-)
n.
1.
a. The manner of thinking, behaving, or reacting characteristic of a specific person: a nervous temperament. See Synonyms at disposition.
b. The distinguishing mental and physical characteristics of a human according to medieval physiology, resulting from dominance of one of the four humors.
2. Excessive irritability or sensitiveness: an actor with too much temperament.
3. Music See equal temperament.

[Middle English, from Latin temperāmentum, from temperāre, to temper; see temper.]

temperament

(ˈtɛmpərəmənt; -prəmənt)
n
1. an individual's character, disposition, and tendencies as revealed in his reactions
2. excitability, moodiness, or anger, esp when displayed openly: an actress with temperament.
3. (Psychology) the characteristic way an individual behaves, esp towards other people. See also character, personality
4. (Music, other)
a. an adjustment made to the frequency differences between notes on a keyboard instrument to allow modulation to other keys
b. any of several systems of such adjustment, such as just temperament, a system not practically possible on keyboard instruments, mean-tone temperament, a system giving an approximation to natural tuning, and equal temperament, the system commonly used in keyboard instruments, giving a scale based on an octave divided into twelve exactly equal semitones. See also just intonation
5. (Psychology) obsolete the characteristic way an individual behaves, viewed as the result of the influence of the four humours (blood, phlegm, yellow bile, and black bile)
6. archaic compromise or adjustment
7. an obsolete word for temperature
[C15: from Latin temperāmentum a mixing in proportion, from temperāre to temper]

tem•per•a•ment

(ˈtɛm pər ə mənt, -prə mənt, -pər mənt)

n.
1. the combination of mental and emotional traits of a person; natural predisposition.
2. unusual personal nature as manifested by peculiarities of feeling, temper, action, etc., often with a disinclination to submit to conventional rules or restraints: a display of temperament.
3. (old physiology) the combination of the four cardinal humors, the relative proportions of which were supposed to determine physical and mental constitution.
4. the tuning of a keyboard instrument, as the piano, organ, or harpsichord, so that the instrument may be played in all keys without further tuning.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin temperāmentum mixture in appropriate proportions; see temper]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.temperament - your usual moodtemperament - your usual mood; "he has a happy disposition"
aloneness, lonesomeness, solitariness, loneliness - a disposition toward being alone
nature - the complex of emotional and intellectual attributes that determine a person's characteristic actions and reactions; "it is his nature to help others"
physicality, animalism - preoccupation with satisfaction of physical drives and appetites
bloodthirstiness, bloodiness - a disposition to shed blood
heart, spirit - an inclination or tendency of a certain kind; "he had a change of heart"
nervousness - a sensitive or highly strung temperament
esprit de corps, team spirit, morale - the spirit of a group that makes the members want the group to succeed
moodiness - having temperamental and changeable moods
blood - temperament or disposition; "a person of hot blood"
cheerfulness, sunniness, cheer, sunshine - the quality of being cheerful and dispelling gloom; "flowers added a note of cheerfulness to the drab room"
uncheerfulness - not conducive to cheer or good spirits
perfectionism - a disposition to feel that anything less than perfect is unacceptable; "his perfectionism seemed excessive to his students"
permissiveness, tolerance - a disposition to allow freedom of choice and behavior
unpermissiveness, restrictiveness - a lack of permissiveness or indulgence and a tendency to confine behavior within certain specified limits
good nature - a cheerful, obliging disposition
agreeability, agreeableness - a temperamental disposition to be agreeable
ill nature - a disagreeable, irritable, or malevolent disposition
disagreeableness - an ill-tempered and offensive disposition
willingness - cheerful compliance; "he expressed his willingness to help"
involuntariness, unwillingness - the trait of being unwilling; "his unwillingness to cooperate vetoed every proposal I made"; "in spite of our warnings he plowed ahead with the involuntariness of an automaton"
friendliness - a friendly disposition
unsociability, unsociableness - an unsociable disposition; avoiding friendship or companionship
unfriendliness - an unfriendly disposition
calm, calmness, composure, equanimity - steadiness of mind under stress; "he accepted their problems with composure and she with equanimity"
discomposure - a temperament that is perturbed and lacking in composure
optimism - a general disposition to expect the best in all things
pessimism - a general disposition to look on the dark side and to expect the worst in all things
epicurism - the disposition and habits of an epicure
gourmandism - the disposition and habits of a gourmand
2.temperament - excessive emotionalism or irritability and excitability (especially when displayed openly)
emotionalism, emotionality - emotional nature or quality
3.temperament - an adjustment of the intervals (as in tuning a keyboard instrument) so that the scale can be used to play in different keys
readjustment, adjustment, registration - the act of adjusting something to match a standard
equal temperament - the division of the scale based on an octave that is divided into twelve exactly equal semitones; "equal temperament is the system commonly used in keyboard instruments"

temperament

noun
1. nature, character, personality, quality, spirit, make-up, soul, constitution, bent, stamp, humour, tendencies, tendency, temper, outlook, complexion, disposition, frame of mind, mettle, cast of mind His impulsive temperament regularly got him into difficulties.
2. moods, anger, volatility, impatience, petulance, excitability, moodiness, explosiveness, hot-headedness, mercurialness Some of the models were given to fits of temperament.

temperament

noun
1. A person's customary manner of emotional response:
2. A tendency to become angry or irritable:
Informal: dander.
Slang: short fuse.
Idiom: low boiling point.
Translations
مِزاج، طَبْع
povaha
naturtemperament
vérmérséklet
lunderni, skapgerî
pagal temperamentątemperamentastemperamentingas
temperaments

temperament

[ˈtempərəmənt] N
1. (= disposition) → temperamento m, disposición f
2. (= moodiness, difficult temperament) → genio m
he has a temperamenttiene genio

temperament

[ˈtɛmpərəmənt] n
(= nature) → tempérament m
His impulsive temperament got him into difficulties → Son tempérament impulsif lui a valu des difficultés.
(= unreasonableness) → lunatisme m
a fit of temperament → une saute d'humeur
She was given to fits of temperament → Elle avait de fréquentes sautes d'humeur.

temperament

n
(= disposition)Veranlagung f; (of a people)Temperament nt; his temperament isn’t suited to that jober ist von seiner Veranlagung her nicht für diese Stelle geeignet; he has an artistic temperamenter ist eine Künstlernatur; their temperaments are quite differentsie sind völlig unterschiedlich veranlagt; he has a happy temperamenter hat ein fröhliches Wesen or Naturell
no art (= temper, excitability)Temperament nt; she was given to fits of temperamentsie war launisch

temperament

[ˈtɛmprəmənt] n (nature) → temperamento, carattere m, indole f; (moodiness) → umore m variabile

temperament

(ˈtempərəmənt) noun
a person's natural way of thinking, behaving etc. She has a sweet/nervous temperament.
ˌtemperaˈmental (-ˈmen-) adjective
emotional; excitable; showing quick changes of mood.
ˌtemperaˈmentally (-ˈmen-) adverb
1. by or according to one's temperament. She is temperamentally unsuited to this job.
2. excitably. She behaved very temperamentally yesterday.

tem·per·a·ment

n. temperamento, combinación de la constitución física, mental y emocional de una persona que la distingue de otras.

temperament

n temperamento
References in classic literature ?
I suppose no woman could have been further in person, voice, and temperament from Dumas' appealing heroine than the veteran actress who first acquainted me with her.
Some among them thought it was on account of her false hair, or the dread of getting the violets wet, while others attributed it to the natural aversion for water sometimes believed to accompany the artistic temperament.
I like not the principle of the natives, which teaches them to submit without a struggle, in emergencies that appear desperate," he said, while busied in this employment; "our own maxim, which says, 'while life remains there is hope', is more consoling, and better suited to a soldier's temperament.
There is nothing so dangerous, so fascinating, to a temperament like yours.
She had devoted herself to him with some little sacrifices of self, only remembered now for their uselessness in saving her father the disappointment that sprang from his sanguine and one- idea'd temperament.
And now, being a trifle choleric in his temperament, the lieutenant-governor uplifted the heavy hilt of his sword, wherewith he so beat and banged upon the door, that, as some of the bystanders whispered, the racket might have disturbed the dead.
She had borne that morning all that nature could endure; and as her temperament was not of the order that escapes from too intense suffering by a swoon, her spirit could only shelter itself beneath a stony crust of insensibility, while the faculties of animal life remained entire.
She was compelled, at these parties, to spend most of her time at the refreshment table, for she could not dance with anybody except other women and very old men; Tamoszius was of an excitable temperament, and afflicted with a frantic jealousy, and any unmarried man who ventured to put his arm about the ample waist of Marija would be certain to throw the orchestra out of tune.
Of two brothers, very similar in temperament and character, one had settled on a flourishing farm in Vermont, and the other became an opulent planter in Louisiana.
No doubt temperament, and, above all, age, have a good deal to do with it.
Such citizens of that village as were of a thoughtful and judicious temperament did not insure against fire; they insured against the fire company.
Life, however, could never be thoroughly dull or lacking in adventure to a child of Rebecca's temperament.