temperance


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Related to temperance: Temperance movement

tem·per·ance

 (tĕm′pər-əns, tĕm′prəns)
n.
1. Abstinence from or moderation in drinking alcoholic beverages. See Synonyms at abstinence.
2. Moderation and self-restraint, as in behavior or expression.

temperance

(ˈtɛmpərəns)
n
1. restraint or moderation, esp in yielding to one's appetites or desires
2. abstinence from alcoholic drink
[C14: from Latin temperantia, from temperāre to regulate]

tem•per•ance

(ˈtɛm pər əns, ˈtɛm prəns)

n.
1. moderation or self-restraint; self-control.
2. habitual moderation in any indulgence, appetite, etc.
3. total abstinence from alcoholic liquors.

Temperance

 of cooks: a company of cooks—Bk. of St. Albans, 1486.

Temperance

 

on the wagon Abstaining from alcoholic beverages; said of a teetotaler or nephalist. This expression is a truncated version of the earlier and more explicit on the water-wagon.

But, R-e-m-o-r-s-e!
The water-wagon is the place for me;
It is no time for mirth and laughter,
The cold, gray dawn of the morning after!
(George Ade, Remorse, 1902)

Antithetically, off the wagon implies the resumption of alcoholic indulgence after a period of abstinence.

Like the bartenders, they fell off the wagon. (A. J. Liebling, “Yea, Verily,”in The New Yorker, September 27, 1952)

teetotal To abstain totally from alcoholic beverages; as an adjective, advocating total abstinence from intoxicating drink. This word is formed by a reduplication of the initial sound of total. It was purportedly coined by Richard Turner (1790-1846) in a speech delivered in England in September, 1833, advocating total abstinence from liquor. Accounts differ as to whether teetotal was intentional as Turner claimed, or the result of a speech defect which caused Turner to stutter, “N-n-nothing but t-t-t-total abstinence will do.” At any rate, John Livesey, a member of the audience and founder of the Total Abstinence Society, credits the word to Turner in his Autobiography (1867), and Turner’s gravestone epitaph reads in part: “Richard Turner, author of the word Teetotal as applied to abstinence from all intoxicating liquors.” Furthermore, a full-page advertisement in the April, 1836, issue of Preston’s Temperance Advocate also credits “Dicky Turner”as the originator of teetotal.

Rev. Joel Jewell, secretary of a temperance society in Lansing, New York, claimed that members of his organization coined the word in 1827 when they handed out pledge cards upon which were printed “O.P.” (Old Pledge—partial abstinence) or “T.” (Total abstinence), encouraging people to sign the latter by crying out “T—total! T—total!”

Although both England and the United States claim credit for the word, it is possible that teetotal developed independently in the two countries. It has since enjoyed extensive and frequent use.

Much stress has been laid by the teetotal advocates on the paramount influence of parental intemperance on the procreation of a mentally deficient progeny. (Thomas Allbutt, A System of Medicine, 1899)

One who abstains from alcoholic consumption is often called a teetotaler.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.temperance - the trait of avoiding excessestemperance - the trait of avoiding excesses  
natural virtue - (scholasticism) one of the four virtues (prudence, justice, fortitude, and temperance) derived from nature
restraint, control - discipline in personal and social activities; "he was a model of polite restraint"; "she never lost control of herself"
dryness, sobriety - moderation in or abstinence from alcohol or other drugs
abstemiousness - moderation in eating and drinking
intemperance - the quality of being intemperate
2.temperance - abstaining from excess
abstinence - act or practice of refraining from indulging an appetite
3.temperance - the act of tempering
compounding, combining, combination - the act of combining things to form a new whole

temperance

noun
1. teetotalism, abstinence, sobriety, abstemiousness a reformed alcoholic extolling the joys of temperance
2. moderation, restraint, self-control, self-discipline, continence, self-restraint, forbearance The age of hedonism was replaced by a new era of temperance.
moderation excess, intemperance, overindulgence, prodigality, immoderation
Quotations
"Temperance is the greatest of all the virtues" [Plutarch Moralia]

temperance

noun
1. Avoidance of extremes of opinion, feeling, or personal conduct:
2. The practice of refraining from use of alcoholic liquors:
Translations

temperance

[ˈtempərəns]
A. N
1. (= moderation) → templanza f (frm), moderación f
2. (= teetotalism) → abstinencia f de bebidas alcohólicas
B. CPD temperance hotel Nhotel m donde no se sirven bebidas alcohólicas
temperance movement Ncampaña f antialcohólica

temperance

[ˈtɛmpərəns] n
(= abstinence from alcohol) → tempérance f
(= moderation) → modération f

temperance

n
(= moderation)Mäßigung f; (in speech etc) → Zurückhaltung f; (in eating, drinking) → Maßhalten nt, → Mäßigung f
(= teetotalism)Enthaltsamkeit f, → Abstinenz f

temperance

:
temperance hotel
temperance movement
nTemperenzler- or Temperenzbewegung f
temperance society
nTemperenzverein mor -gesellschaft f

temperance

[ˈtɛmprns] n (frm) (self-control) → moderazione f; (in drinking) → temperanza nel bere; (teetotalism) → astinenza dal bere
References in classic literature ?
We came on the cars from Temperance yesterday, slept all night at my cousin's, and drove from her house--eight miles it is--this morning.
The school teacher and the minister at Temperance had tried and failed; the young artist who came for the summer to sketch the red barn, the ruined mill, and the bridge ended by giving up all these local beauties and devoting herself to the face of a child,--a small, plain face illuminated by a pair of eyes carrying such messages, such suggestions, such hints of sleeping power and insight, that one never tired of looking into their shining depths, nor of fancying that what one saw there was the reflection of one's own thought.
There happened to be a great Temperance Convention held here on the day after our arrival; and as the order of march brought the procession under the windows of the hotel in which we lodged, when they started in the morning, I had a good opportunity of seeing it.
Washington Auxiliary Temperance Societies;' and was marshalled by officers on horseback, who cantered briskly up and down the line, with scarves and ribbons of bright colours fluttering out behind them gaily.
Now, these here fellows, my boy, are a-goin' to-night to get up the monthly meetin' o' the Brick Lane Branch o' the United Grand Junction Ebenezer Temperance Association.
The monthly meetings of the Brick Lane Branch of the United Grand Junction Ebenezer Temperance Association were held in a large room, pleasantly and airily situated at the top of a safe and commodious ladder.
Meno is very ready to admit that justice is virtue: 'Would you say virtue or a virtue, for there are other virtues, such as courage, temperance, and the like; just as round is a figure, and black and white are colours, and yet there are other figures and other colours.
Nothing is said of the pre-existence of ideas of justice, temperance, and the like.
Are not the chief elements of temperance, speaking generally, obedience to commanders and self-control in sensual pleasures?
The temperance of the hero proceeds from the same wish to do no dishonor to the worthiness he has.
Yet Dives himself, he too lives like a Czar in an ice palace made of frozen sighs, and being a president of a temperance society, he only drinks the tepid tears of orphans.
TOM joined the new order of Cadets of Temperance, being attracted by the showy character of their "regalia.