temperate


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Related to temperate: Temperate Zone, undivulged, temperate phage

tem·per·ate

 (tĕm′pər-ĭt, tĕm′prĭt)
adj.
1.
a. Of or occurring in the Temperate Zone: temperate regions; temperate species.
b. Characterized by moderate temperatures, weather, or climate; neither hot nor cold.
2.
a. Moderate in degree or quality; restrained: temperate criticism.
b. Exercising moderation and self-restraint: learned to be temperate in eating and drinking.
3. Biology Of or relating to a virus that infects bacterial cells but rarely causes lysis: temperate bacteriophages.

[Middle English temperat, from Latin temperātus, from past participle of temperāre, to temper; see temper.]

tem′per·ate·ly adv.
tem′per·ate·ness n.

temperate

(ˈtɛmpərɪt; ˈtɛmprɪt)
adj
1. (Physical Geography) having a climate intermediate between tropical and polar; moderate or mild in temperature
2. mild in quality or character; exhibiting temperance
[C14: from Latin temperātus]
ˈtemperately adv
ˈtemperateness n

tem•per•ate

(ˈtɛm pər ɪt, ˈtɛm prɪt)

adj.
1. moderate or self-restrained; not extreme in opinion, statement, etc.
2. moderate in any indulgence, as in the use of alcoholic liquors.
3. (of things) not excessive in degree.
4. moderate in respect to temperature; not subject to prolonged extremes of hot or cold weather.
5. (of a virus) existing in infected host cells but rarely causing lysis.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin temperātus, past participle of temperāre. See temper, -ate1]
tem′per•ate•ly, adv.
tem′per•ate•ness, n.
syn: See moderate.

tem·per·ate

(tĕm′pər-ĭt)
Marked by moderate temperatures, weather, or climate; neither hot nor cold.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.temperate - (of weather or climate) free from extremes; mild; or characteristic of such weather or climate; "a temperate region"; "the temperate zones"; "temperate plants"
clement - (of weather or climate) physically mild; "clement weather"
intemperate - (of weather or climate) not mild; subject to extremes; "an intemperate climate"; "intemperate zones"
2.temperate - not extreme in behavior; "temperate in his habits"; "a temperate response to an insult"; "temperate in his eating and drinking"
mild - moderate in type or degree or effect or force; far from extreme; "a mild winter storm"; "a mild fever"; "fortunately the pain was mild"; "a mild rebuke"; "mild criticism"
moderate - being within reasonable or average limits; not excessive or extreme; "moderate prices"; "a moderate income"; "a moderate fine"; "moderate demands"; "a moderate estimate"; "a moderate eater"; "moderate success"; "a kitchen of moderate size"; "the X-ray showed moderate enlargement of the heart"
intemperate - excessive in behavior; "intemperate rage"
3.temperate - not extreme; "a moderate penalty"; "temperate in his response to criticism"
mild - moderate in type or degree or effect or force; far from extreme; "a mild winter storm"; "a mild fever"; "fortunately the pain was mild"; "a mild rebuke"; "mild criticism"

temperate

adjective
1. mild, moderate, balmy, fair, cool, soft, calm, gentle, pleasant, clement, agreeable The valley keeps a temperate climate throughout the year.
mild severe, extreme, harsh, intemperate, inclement, torrid
3. abstemious, continent, sober, abstinent, moderate He lived a temperate and contented life with his wife.
abstemious intemperate, immoderate, excessive, prodigal, inordinate

temperate

adjective
1. Exercising moderation and self-restraint in appetites and behavior:
2. Not excessive or extreme in amount, degree, or force:
3. Kept within sensible limits:
4. Free from extremes in temperature:
Translations
مُعْتَدِل، غَيْر مُتَطَرِّف
mírný
mild
hillittykohtuullinenlauhkeamaltillinen
higgadtmérsékeltmértéktartó
tempraîur
atturīgsmērens

temperate

[ˈtempərɪt] ADJ [climate, zone] → templado; [person] → moderado; (in drinking) → abstemio
to be temperate in one's demandsser moderado en sus exigencias

temperate

[ˈtɛmpərət] adj
[climate, zone, region] → tempéré(e); [forest] → des climats tempérés
(= moderate) [person, behaviour] → modéré(e)

temperate

adj
climategemäßigt; forestmit gemäßigtem Klima; (Bot, Zool) plant, animalin gemäßigten Klimazonen beheimatet; the Temperate Zonedie gemäßigte Klimazone
person, languagegemäßigt; (in eating, demands) → maßvoll

temperate

[ˈtɛmprɪt] adj (climate, zone) → temperato/a (frm) (language, response) → moderato/a

temperate

(ˈtempərət) adjective
(of climate) neither too hot nor too cold.

tem·per·ate

a. moderado-a; sobrio-a, abstemio-a.
References in classic literature ?
As icebergs are known to be sometimes loaded with earth and stones, and have even carried brushwood, bones, and the nest of a land-bird, I can hardly doubt that they must occasionally have transported seeds from one part to another of the arctic and antarctic regions, as suggested by Lyell; and during the Glacial period from one part of the now temperate regions to another.
Nearly the same inquiry may be made concerning a woman and a child, whether these also have their proper virtues; whether a woman ought to be temperate, brave, and just, and whether a child is temperate or no; and indeed this inquiry ought to be general, whether the virtues of those who, by nature, either govern or are governed, are the same or different; for if it is necessary that both of them should partake of the fair and good, why is it also necessary that, without exception, the one should govern, the other always be governed?
By a Law of Nature with us, there is a constant attraction to the South; and, although in temperate climates this is very slight -- so that even a Woman in reasonable health can journey several furlongs northward without much difficulty -- yet the hampering effect of the southward attraction is quite sufficient to serve as a compass in most parts of our earth.
I am temperate to the verge of absurdity," replied the Tramp.
The people in Hawaii seemed to drink a bit more, on the average, than the people in more temperate latitudes.
Nevertheless he ought to be slow to believe and to act, nor should he himself show fear, but proceed in a temperate manner with prudence and humanity, so that too much confidence may not make him incautious and too much distrust render him intolerable.
And being perfect, is therefore wise and valiant and temperate and just.
Natural as it is to be somewhat incredulous concerning the populousness of the more enormous creatures of the globe, yet what shall we say to Harto, the historian of Goa, when he tells us that at one hunting the King of Siam took elephants; that in those regions elephants are numerous as droves of cattle in the temperate climes.
They will be more temperate and cool, and in that respect, as well as in others, will be more in capacity to act advisedly than the offending State.
The only excesses indulged in by this temperate and exemplary people, appear to be gambling and horseracing.
Let not the government of the plantation, depend upon too many counsellors, and undertakers, in the country that planteth, but upon a temperate number; and let those be rather noblemen and gentlemen, than merchants; for they look ever to the present gain.
Dashwood, trusting to the temperate account of her own disappointment which Elinor had sent her, was led away by the exuberance of her joy to think only of what would increase it.