tempered


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tem·pered

 (tĕm′pərd)
adj.
1. Having a specified temper or disposition. Often used in combination: sweet-tempered; ill-tempered.
2. Adjusted or attuned by the addition of a counterbalancing element; moderated or measured: "Party elites in Washington were content with a politics of compromise and tempered ideology" (Bill Bishop).
3. Made appropriately hard or flexible by tempering: a sword of tempered steel.
4. Having the requisite degree of hardness or elasticity. Used of glass or a metal.
5. Music Tuned to temperament. Used of a scale, an interval, a semitone, or intonation.

tempered

(ˈtɛmpəd)
adj
1. (Music, other) music
a. (of a scale) having the frequency differences between notes adjusted in accordance with the system of equal temperament. See temperament
b. (of an interval) expanded or contracted from the state of being pure
2. (in combination) having a temper or temperament as specified: ill-tempered.

tem•pered

(ˈtɛm pərd)

adj.
1. having a temper or disposition as specified (usu. used in combination): a good-tempered child.
2. Music. tuned in accordance with some temperament, esp. equal temperament.
3. made less intense or violent, esp. by the influence of something else.
4. properly mixed, as clay.
5. of or pertaining to steel or cast iron that has been tempered.
[1325–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tempered - made hard or flexible or resilient especially by heat treatmenttempered - made hard or flexible or resilient especially by heat treatment; "a sword of tempered steel"; "tempered glass"
unhardened, untempered - not brought to a proper consistency or hardness; "untempered mortar"; "untempered steel"
2.tempered - adjusted or attuned by adding a counterbalancing element; "criticism tempered with kindly sympathy"
untempered - not moderated or controlled; "his untempered individualism"
Translations

tempered

[ˈtempəd] ADJtemplado

tempered

[ˈtɛmpərd] adj [steel] → trempé(e)temper tantrum ncrise f
to have a temper tantrum → piquer une crise

tempered

adj
steelgehärtet
(Mus) → temperiert

tempered

[ˈtɛmpəd] adj (steel) → temprato/a
References in classic literature ?
If our expectation of advantage be tempered in this way, we may succeed in accomplishing the essential part of our schemes.
Three punctures were made in the heathen flesh, and the White Whale's barbs were then tempered.
His opinions were always impersonal; and now as their manner rather than their make has been slightly tempered, it may surprise the belated reader to learn that it was the belief of one English critic that their author had "placed himself beyond the pale of decency" by them.
Ikea said it uses special tempered glass that is designed to shatter to minimise risk of injury.
The single components (LSR and thermoplastics) as well as the thermoplastic/LSR combinations were tempered in a convection oven (Binder) at three different temperatures (80[degrees]C, 100[degrees]C, and 120[degrees]C) for 3 h or at constant temperature (100[degrees]C) for various durations (1, 3, 6, or 9 h).
The Tempered Block Breaker breaks up semi-frozen block back into the natural pieces--meaning you don't have to label your product as processed.
During tempering at 500[degrees]C, the microstructure slightly changed; only a little amount of carbide was precipitated in the matrix, and the martensite matrix transformed to a tempered martensite.
That said, of course bad tempered people first have to admit that they have a problem to begin with.
Beyond the heat treatment to convert the white iron cementite to a temper carbon form, these specific grades were made by either a controlled air quench and temper from the malleablizing temperature (resulting in a tempered pearlite) or a second heat treat operation consisting of reheating followed by an oil quench and temper (tempered martensite).
Painter's analysis of the phenomenon of tempered modernism itself begins with an examination of the cultural antecedents its practitioners chose as models: a particular view of the classical past which saw antiquity as an extension of the present rather than as an abstract ideal; an affinity for architectural imagery; an attraction to the perceived concision and incisiveness of Chinese and particularly Japanese poetic forms.
My enthusiasm was tempered quickly, however, by the nearly instantaneous statements by both future House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and DNC Chairman Howard Dean that impeachment was off the table.