tempest


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tem·pest

 (tĕm′pĭst)
n.
1. A violent windstorm, frequently accompanied by rain, snow, or hail.
2. Furious agitation, commotion, or tumult; an uproar: "The tempest in my mind / Doth from my senses take all feeling" (Shakespeare).
tr.v. tem·pest·ed, tem·pest·ing, tem·pests
To cause a tempest around or in.
Idiom:
tempest in a teacup/teapot
A great disturbance or uproar over a matter of little or no importance.

[Middle English, from Old French tempeste, from Vulgar Latin *tempesta, variant of Latin tempestās, from tempus, time.]

tempest

(ˈtɛmpɪst)
n
1. (Physical Geography) chiefly literary a violent wind or storm
2. a violent commotion, uproar, or disturbance
vb
(tr) poetic to agitate or disturb violently
[C13: from Old French tempeste, from Latin tempestās storm, from tempus time]

tem•pest

(ˈtɛm pɪst)

n.
1. a violent windstorm, esp. one with rain.
2. a violent commotion, disturbance, or tumult.
v.t.
3. to affect by a tempest; disturb violently.
[1200–50; Middle English tempeste < Old French < Vulgar Latin *tempesta, for Latin tempestās season, weather, storm =tempes- (variant s. of tempus time) + -tās -ty2]

tempest

An unclassified term referring to technical investigations for compromising emanations from electrically operated information processing equipment; these investigations are conducted in support of emanations and emissions security. See also counterintelligence.

Tempest

 a tumultuous throng; a rushing crowd of people or things, 1746.
Examples: tempest of cheering, 1909; of wild horses, 1866; of sand, 1856; of temptations, 1606; of wind, 1250.

tempest


Past participle: tempested
Gerund: tempesting

Imperative
tempest
tempest
Present
I tempest
you tempest
he/she/it tempests
we tempest
you tempest
they tempest
Preterite
I tempested
you tempested
he/she/it tempested
we tempested
you tempested
they tempested
Present Continuous
I am tempesting
you are tempesting
he/she/it is tempesting
we are tempesting
you are tempesting
they are tempesting
Present Perfect
I have tempested
you have tempested
he/she/it has tempested
we have tempested
you have tempested
they have tempested
Past Continuous
I was tempesting
you were tempesting
he/she/it was tempesting
we were tempesting
you were tempesting
they were tempesting
Past Perfect
I had tempested
you had tempested
he/she/it had tempested
we had tempested
you had tempested
they had tempested
Future
I will tempest
you will tempest
he/she/it will tempest
we will tempest
you will tempest
they will tempest
Future Perfect
I will have tempested
you will have tempested
he/she/it will have tempested
we will have tempested
you will have tempested
they will have tempested
Future Continuous
I will be tempesting
you will be tempesting
he/she/it will be tempesting
we will be tempesting
you will be tempesting
they will be tempesting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been tempesting
you have been tempesting
he/she/it has been tempesting
we have been tempesting
you have been tempesting
they have been tempesting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been tempesting
you will have been tempesting
he/she/it will have been tempesting
we will have been tempesting
you will have been tempesting
they will have been tempesting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been tempesting
you had been tempesting
he/she/it had been tempesting
we had been tempesting
you had been tempesting
they had been tempesting
Conditional
I would tempest
you would tempest
he/she/it would tempest
we would tempest
you would tempest
they would tempest
Past Conditional
I would have tempested
you would have tempested
he/she/it would have tempested
we would have tempested
you would have tempested
they would have tempested
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tempest - a violent commotion or disturbancetempest - a violent commotion or disturbance; "the storms that had characterized their relationship had died away"; "it was only a tempest in a teapot"
commotion, hoo-ha, hoo-hah, hurly burly, kerfuffle, to-do, disruption, disturbance, flutter - a disorderly outburst or tumult; "they were amazed by the furious disturbance they had caused"
2.tempest - (literary) a violent wind; "a tempest swept over the island"
literature - creative writing of recognized artistic value
windstorm - a storm consisting of violent winds

tempest

noun
1. (Literary) storm, hurricane, gale, tornado, cyclone, typhoon, squall torrential rain and howling tempest
2. storm, furore, disturbance, upheaval, uproar, ferment, commotion, tumult I hadn't foreseen the tempest my request would cause.
uproar peace, quiet, calm, serenity, tranquillity, stillness
Translations
عاصِفَه
bouře
storm
óveîur, ofviîri
aistringumas
vētra
boraşiddetli fırtına

tempest

[ˈtempɪst] N (poet) → tempestad f
a tempest in a teapot (US) → una tormenta or tempestad en un vaso de agua

tempest

[ˈtɛmpɪst] n (= violent storm) → tempête f

tempest

n (liter)Sturm m (also fig), → Unwetter nt; it was a tempest in a teapot (US) → es war ein Sturm im Wasserglas

tempest

[ˈtɛmpɪst] n (liter) → tempesta

tempest

(ˈtempist) noun
a violent storm, with very strong winds. A tempest arose and they were drowned at sea.
tempestuous (temˈpestjuəs) adjective
1. (of a person, behaviour etc) violently emotional; passionate. a tempestuous argument/relationship.
2. very stormy; of or like a tempest. tempestuous winds.
temˈpestuously adverb
temˈpestuousness noun

tempest

n. tempestad, tormenta.
References in classic literature ?
There was an occasional tempest, and once Jo marched home, declaring she couldn't bear it longer, but Aunt March always cleared up quickly, and sent for her to come back again with such urgency that she could not refuse, for in her heart she rather liked the peppery old lady.
While the nearer waters roll, While the tempest still is high.
She arose, calmly, as if no tempest had shaken and threatened her existence but yesterday.
You have no warranty for such an audacious doctrine, nor any covenant to support it," cried David who was deeply tinctured with the subtle distinctions which, in his time , and more especially in his province, had been drawn around the beautiful simplicity of revelation, by endeavoring to penetrate the awful mystery of the divine nature, supplying faith by self-sufficiency, and by consequence, involving those who reasoned from such human dogmas in absurdities and doubt; "your temple is reared on the sands, and the first tempest will wash away its foundation.
how bitterly will burst those straps in the first howling gale, when thou art driven, straps, buttons, and all, down the throat of the tempest.
As, blind and deaf, the whale plunged forward, as if by sheer power of speed to rid himself of the iron leech that had fastened to him; as we thus tore a white gash in the sea, on all sides menaced as we flew, by the crazed creatures to and fro rushing about us; our beset boat was like a ship mobbed by ice-isles in a tempest, and striving to steer through their complicated channels and straits, knowing not at what moment it may be locked in and crushed.
Furious gusts of emotion would come sweeping over her, shaking her as the tempest shakes the trees upon the hills; all her frame would quiver and throb with them--it was as if some dreadful thing rose up within her and took possession of her, torturing her, tearing her.
The powwow and racket were prodigious; it was a tempest of riot and con- fusion and thick-falling blows.
The fighting ceased instantly; the cursing ceased; for one distinctly defined moment, there was a dead hush, a motionless calm, where the tempest had been; then with one impulse the multitude awoke to life and energy again, and went surging and struggling and swaying, this way and that, its outer edges melting away through windows and doors and gradually lessening the pressure and relieving the mass.
The tempest rose higher and higher, and presently the sail tore loose from its fastenings and went winging away on the blast.
I was not surprised, when I ran down into the hall, to see that a brilliant June morning had succeeded to the tempest of the night; and to feel, through the open glass door, the breathing of a fresh and fragrant breeze.
Heathcliff and his man climbed the cellar steps with vexatious phlegm: I don't think they moved one second faster than usual, though the hearth was an absolute tempest of worrying and yelping.