temple


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tem·ple 1

 (tĕm′pəl)
n.
1.
a. A building dedicated to religious ceremonies or worship.
b. Temple Either of two successive buildings in ancient Jerusalem serving as the primary center for Jewish worship.
c. Judaism A synagogue, especially of a Reform congregation.
d. Mormon Church A building in which the sacred ordinances are administered.
2. Something regarded as having within it a divine presence.
3. A building used for meetings by any of several fraternal orders, such as the Freemasons.
4. A building reserved for a highly valued function: the library, a temple of learning.
5. Temple Either of two groups of buildings in London, the Inner Temple and the Middle Temple, that house two of the four Inns of Court and that occupy the site of a complex used by the medieval Knights Templars.

[Middle English, from Old English tempel, from Latin templum; see tem- in Indo-European roots.]

tem·ple 2

 (tĕm′pəl)
n.
1. The flat region on either side of the forehead.
2. Either of the sidepieces of a frame for eyeglasses that extends along the temple and over the ear.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *tempula, from Latin tempora, pl. of tempus, temple of the head.]

tem·ple 3

 (tĕm′pəl)
n.
A device in a loom that keeps the cloth stretched to the correct width during weaving.

[Middle English tempille, from Old French temple, possibly from Latin templum, small piece of timber; see tem- in Indo-European roots.]

temple

(ˈtɛmpəl)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a building or place dedicated to the worship of a deity or deities
2. (Christian Churches, other) a Mormon church
3. (Judaism) US another name for a synagogue
4. (Ecclesiastical Terms) any Christian church, esp a large or imposing one
5. (Theology) any place or object regarded as a shrine where God makes himself present, esp the body of a person who has been sanctified or saved by grace
6. a building regarded as the focus of an activity, interest, or practice: a temple of the arts.
[Old English tempel, from Latin templum; probably related to Latin tempus time, Greek temenos sacred enclosure, literally: a place cut off, from temnein to cut]
ˈtempled adj
ˈtemple-ˌlike adj

temple

(ˈtɛmpəl)
n
(Anatomy) the region on each side of the head in front of the ear and above the cheek bone.
[C14: from Old French temple, from Latin tempora the temples, from tempus temple of the head]

temple

(ˈtɛmpəl)
n
(Textiles) the part of a loom that keeps the cloth being woven stretched to the correct width
[C15: from French, from Latin templum a small timber]

Temple

(ˈtɛmpəl)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) either of two buildings in London and Paris that belonged to the Templars. The one in London now houses two of the chief law societies
2. (Bible) any of three buildings or groups of buildings erected by the Jews in ancient Jerusalem for the worship of Jehovah

Temple

(ˈtɛmpəl)
n
1. (Biography) Shirley, married name Shirley Temple Black. 1928–2014, US film actress and politician. Her films as a child star include Little Miss Marker (1934), Wee Willie Winkie (1937), and Heidi (1937). She was US ambassador to Ghana (1974–76) and to Czechoslovakia (1989–92)
2. (Biography) Sir William. 1628–99, English diplomat and essayist. He negotiated the Triple Alliance (1668) and the marriage of William of Orange to Mary II
3. (Biography) William. 1881–1944, English prelate and advocate of social reform; archbishop of Canterbury (1942–44)

tem•ple1

(ˈtɛm pəl)

n.
1. an edifice or place dedicated to the service or worship of a deity.
2. (usu. cap.) any of the three successive houses of worship in Jerusalem in use by the Jews in Biblical times.
3. a synagogue.
4. a church, esp. a large or imposing one.
5. any place or object in which God dwells, as the body of a Christian. I Cor. 6:19.
6. (in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) a building for sacred ordinances.
7. any large or pretentious public building.
8. (cap.) either of two groups of buildings on the site of the Templars' former establishment in London, occupied by two of the Inns of Court.
9. a building used by a fraternal order.
[before 900; Middle English, variant of tempel, Old English < Latin templum space demarcated by an augur for taking auspices, temple]

tem•ple2

(ˈtɛm pəl)

n.
1. the region of the face that lies on either side of the forehead.
2. either of the sidepieces of a pair of eyeglasses extending back above the ears.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Middle French < Vulgar Latin *tempula, for Latin tempora the temples, pl. (taken as feminine singular) of tempus temple]

Tem•ple

(ˈtɛm pəl)

n.
1. Shirley (Shirley Temple Black), born 1928, U.S. film actress and diplomat.
2. Sir William, 1628–99, English essayist and diplomat.

Temple

 a local group of Oddfellows.

temple

A place of worship particularly associated with classical Greek architecture.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.temple - place of worship consisting of an edifice for the worship of a deitytemple - place of worship consisting of an edifice for the worship of a deity
joss house - a Chinese temple or shrine for idol worship
pagoda - an Asian temple; usually a pyramidal tower with an upward curving roof
pantheon - (antiquity) a temple to all the gods
house of God, house of prayer, house of worship, place of worship - any building where congregations gather for prayer
2.temple - the flat area on either side of the forehead; "the veins in his temple throbbed"
head, caput - the upper part of the human body or the front part of the body in animals; contains the face and brains; "he stuck his head out the window"
feature, lineament - the characteristic parts of a person's face: eyes and nose and mouth and chin; "an expression of pleasure crossed his features"; "his lineaments were very regular"
3.temple - an edifice devoted to special or exalted purposes
building, edifice - a structure that has a roof and walls and stands more or less permanently in one place; "there was a three-story building on the corner"; "it was an imposing edifice"
pillar, column - (architecture) a tall vertical cylindrical structure standing upright and used to support a structure
entablature - (architecture) the structure consisting of the part of a classical temple above the columns between a capital and the roof
ziggurat, zikkurat, zikurat - a rectangular tiered temple or terraced mound erected by the ancient Assyrians and Babylonians
4.temple - (Judaism) the place of worship for a Jewish congregationtemple - (Judaism) the place of worship for a Jewish congregation
house of God, house of prayer, house of worship, place of worship - any building where congregations gather for prayer
Judaism - the monotheistic religion of the Jews having its spiritual and ethical principles embodied chiefly in the Torah and in the Talmud

temple

1

temple

2 noun
Related words
adjective temporal
Translations
صَدْغ الإنْسان، أحَدُ جانِبَي الجَبينمَعْبَدهَيْكَل، مَعبَد
храм
chrámspáneksvatyně
tempeltinding
temppeliohimo
hram
halántéktemplom
kuil
musterigagnaugahof
寺院
신전
templum
deniņisvētnīcatemplis
chrám
tempeljsence
tempel
วัด
đền

temple

[ˈtempl] N
1. (Rel) → templo m
2. (Anat) → sien f
3. the Temple (in London) → el Colegio de Abogados

temple

[ˈtɛmpəl] n
(= building) → temple m
(part of the head)tempe f

temple

1
n (Rel) → Tempel m

temple

2
n (Anat) → Schläfe f

temple

[ˈtɛmpl] n
a. (Rel) → tempio
b. (Anat) → tempia

temple1

(ˈtempl) noun
a building in which people worship, usually as part of a non-Christian religion. a Greek/Hindu temple.

temple2

(ˈtempl) noun
either of the flat parts of the head at the side of the forehead. The stone hit him on the temple.

temple

مَعْبَد chrám tempel Tempel ναός templo temppeli temple hram tempio 寺院 신전 tempel tempel świątynia templo храм tempel วัด tapınak đền 庙宇

tem·ple

n. sien, superficie lisa a cada lado de la parte lateral de la cabeza.

temple

n (anat) sien f
References in classic literature ?
I can remember Miss Temple walking lightly and rapidly along our drooping line, her plaid cloak, which the frosty wind fluttered, gathered close about her, and encouraging us, by precept and example, to keep up our spirits, and march forward, as she said, "like stalwart soldiers.
51-61) `Delos, if you would be willing to be the abode of my son "Phoebus Apollo and make him a rich temple --; for no other will touch you, as you will find: and I think you will never be rich in oxen and sheep, nor bear vintage nor yet produce plants abundantly.
In an apartment of the great temple of Denderah, some fifty years ago, there was discovered upon the granite ceiling a sculptured and painted planisphere, abounding in centaurs, griffins, and dolphins, similar to the grotesque figures on the celestial globe of the moderns.
The great Temple of the Sun, the Temple of Jupiter, and several smaller temples, are clustered together in the midst of one of these miserable Syrian villages, and look strangely enough in such plebeian company.
For six long Martian months I had haunted the vicinity of the hateful Temple of the Sun, within whose slow-revolving shaft, far beneath the surface of Mars, my princess lay entombed--but whether alive or dead I knew not.
We had eaten and rested, and I had slept, much to Ja's amusement, for it seemed that he seldom if ever did so, and then the red man proposed that I accompany him to the temple of the Mahars which lay not far from his village.
Again he became conscious of a stealthy movement within the great temple before him.
In a word, the stern ascetic rigour of the Temple discipline, which had been so long exchanged for prodigal and licentious indulgence, seemed at once to have revived at Templestowe under the severe eye of Lucas Beaumanoir.
I did not remind Kantos Kan of the terrible fact that ere we could hope to enter the Temple of Issus, the Princess of Helium would be no more.
He continued his search and at last found the doorway leading inward beneath the city and the temple.
He had been recommended to the favor of Judge Temple by the head of an eminent mercantile house in New York, with whom Marmaduke was in habits of intimacy, and accustomed to exchange good offices.
As to temples for public worship, and the hall for the public tables of the chief magistrates, they ought to be built in proper places, and contiguous to each other, except those temples which the law or the oracle orders to be separate from all other buildings; and let these be in such a conspicuous eminence, that they may have every advantage of situation, and in the neighbourhood of that part of the city which is best fortified.