temporal


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

tem·po·ral 1

 (tĕm′pər-əl, tĕm′prəl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or limited by time: a temporal dimension; temporal and spatial boundaries.
2. Of or relating to the material world; worldly: the temporal possessions of the Church.
3. Lasting only for a time; not eternal; passing: our temporal existence.
4. Secular or lay; civil: lords temporal and spiritual.
5. Grammar Expressing time: a temporal adverb.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin temporālis, from tempus, tempor-, time.]

tem′po·ral·ly adv.

tem·po·ral 2

 (tĕm′pər-əl, tĕm′prəl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or near the temples of the skull.

[Late Latin temporālis, from Latin tempora, pl. of tempus, temple.]

temporal

(ˈtɛmpərəl; ˈtɛmprəl)
adj
1. of or relating to time
2. of or relating to secular as opposed to spiritual or religious affairs: the lords spiritual and temporal.
3. lasting for a relatively short time
4. (Grammar) grammar of or relating to tense or the linguistic expression of time in general: a temporal adverb.
[C14: from Latin temporālis, from tempus time]
ˈtemporally adv
ˈtemporalness n

temporal

(ˈtɛmpərəl; ˈtɛmprəl)
adj
(Anatomy) anatomy of, relating to, or near the temple or temples
[C16: from Late Latin temporālis belonging to the temples; see temple2]

tem•po•ral1

(ˈtɛm pər əl, ˈtɛm prəl)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to time.
2. pertaining to the present life; worldly: temporal joys.
3. temporary or transitory, as opposed to eternal.
4. of or pertaining to verb tenses or the expression of time: a temporal adverb.
5. secular, lay, or civil, as opposed to ecclesiastical.
n.
6. a temporal possession, estate, or the like; temporality.
7. a temporal matter or affair.
Usu., temporals.
[1300–50; Middle English (adj. and n.) < Latin temporālis=tempor-, s. of tempus time + -ālis -al1]
tem′po•ral•ly, adv.
tem′po•ral•ness, n.

tem•po•ral2

(ˈtɛm pər əl, ˈtɛm prəl)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or situated near the temple or a temporal bone.
n.
2. any of several parts in the temporal region, esp. the temporal bone.
[1535–45; < Late Latin temporālis= Latin tempor-, s. of tempus temple2 + -ālis -al1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.temporal - the semantic role of the noun phrase that designates the time of the state or action denoted by the verb
participant role, semantic role - (linguistics) the underlying relation that a constituent has with the main verb in a clause
Adj.1.temporal - not eternal; "temporal matters of but fleeting moment"- F.D.Roosevelt
impermanent, temporary - not permanent; not lasting; "politics is an impermanent factor of life"- James Thurber; "impermanent palm cottages"; "a temperary arrangement"; "temporary housing"
2.temporal - of or relating to or limited by time; "temporal processing"; "temporal dimensions"; "temporal and spacial boundaries"; "music is a temporal art"
3.temporal - of or relating to the temples (the sides of the skull behind the orbit); "temporal bone"
4.temporal - characteristic of or devoted to the temporal world as opposed to the spiritual world; "worldly goods and advancement"; "temporal possessions of the church"
earthly - of or belonging to or characteristic of this earth as distinguished from heaven; "earthly beings"; "believed that our earthly life is all that matters"; "earthly love"; "our earthly home"
profane, secular - not concerned with or devoted to religion; "sacred and profane music"; "secular drama"; "secular architecture", "children being brought up in an entirely profane environment"
sophisticated - having or appealing to those having worldly knowledge and refinement and savoir-faire; "sophisticated young socialites"; "a sophisticated audience"; "a sophisticated lifestyle"; "a sophisticated book"
5.temporal - of this earth or world; "temporal joys"; "our temporal existence"
earthly - of or belonging to or characteristic of this earth as distinguished from heaven; "earthly beings"; "believed that our earthly life is all that matters"; "earthly love"; "our earthly home"

temporal

adjective
1. secular, worldly, lay, earthly, mundane, material, civil, fleshly, mortal, terrestrial, carnal, profane, sublunary Clergy should not be pre-occupied with temporal matters.
2. time-related, of time, relating to time Specific acts are related to a temporal and spatial context.
3. temporary, passing, transitory, fleeting, short-lived, fugitive, transient, momentary, evanescent, impermanent, fugacious The temporal gifts that Fortune grants in this world are finally worthless.

temporal

adjective
1. Relating to or characteristic of the earth or of human life on earth:
3. Not religious in subject matter, form, or use:
Translations
časovýspánkový
verdslig
maallinen
temporeltemporelle

temporal

[ˈtempərəl] ADJ (Ling) [conjunction, clause] → temporal

temporal

[ˈtɛmpərəl] adj
(= secular) [leader, power] → temporel(le)
(= relating to time) [perspective, context, dimension] → temporel(e)
(ANATOMY) [lobe] → temporal(e)

temporal

adj
zeitlich; (Gram) → Zeit-, temporal; temporal adverbZeitadverb nt
(Rel) → weltlich

temporal

[ˈtɛmprl] adjtemporale

tem·po·ral

a. temporal. rel. a la sien;
___ arteryarteria ___;
___ bonehueso ___;
___ lobelóbulo ___ rel. al tiempo.

temporal

adj temporal
References in classic literature ?
Adam Colburn gradually acquired reputation, not only in the management of the temporal affairs of the Society, but as a clear and efficient preacher of their doctrines.
For as the temporal sword is to be drawn with great circumspection in cases of religion; so it is a thing monstrous to put it into the hands of the common people.
There is, of course, a difference between knowing the temporal relation of a remembered event to the present, and knowing the time-order of two remembered events.
After my care of his eternal welfare had met with such success, I could not forbear attempting something for his temporal, and by my endeavours matters were so accommodated that the relations were willing to grant his life on condition he paid a certain number of cows, or the value.
In short, we are madly erring, through self-esteem, in believing man, in either his temporal or future destinies, to be of more moment in the universe than that vast "clod of the valley" which he tills and contemns, and to which he denies a soul for no more profound reason than that he does not behold it in operation.
Holding in the theoretical belief of almost every one the absolute power of all men's salvation or spiritual death, monopolizing almost all learning and education, the Church exercised in the spiritual sphere, and to no small extent in the temporal, a despotic tyranny, a tyranny employed sometimes for good, sometimes for evil.
It never occurred to him that by this action he was weakening himself, depriving himself of friends and of those who had thrown themselves into his lap, whilst he aggrandized the Church by adding much temporal power to the spiritual, thus giving it greater authority.
The execution will therefore only be delayed long enough for you to arrange your spiritual and temporal affairs.
The reader can form an idea of the numberless embarrassments which this double relationship had caused him, and of all the temporal reefs among which his spiritual bark had been forced to tack, in order not to suffer shipwreck on either Louis or Charles, that Scylla and that Charybdis which had devoured the Duc de Nemours and the Constable de Saint-Pol.
Bad language was no longer heard, and the little nastinesses of small boys were looked upon with hostility; the bigger boys, like the lords temporal of the Middle Ages, used the strength of their arms to persuade those weaker than themselves to virtuous courses.
That insures us a temporal, but this an eternal happiness.
It had been observed in this good lady (who did not want for personal attractions, being plump and buxom to look at, though like her fair daughter, somewhat short in stature) that this uncertainty of disposition strengthened and increased with her temporal prosperity; and divers wise men and matrons, on friendly terms with the locksmith and his family, even went so far as to assert, that a tumble down some half-dozen rounds in the world's ladder--such as the breaking of the bank in which her husband kept his money, or some little fall of that kind--would be the making of her, and could hardly fail to render her one of the most agreeable companions in existence.