tenacity


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te·na·cious

 (tə-nā′shəs)
adj.
1.
a. Extremely persistent in adhering to or doing something; stubborn or relentless: "tenacious defenders of their harsh and pitiless land" (Dee Brown).
b. Characterized by extreme persistence; relentless or enduring: tenacious detective work; tenacious superstitions.
2. Holding together firmly; cohesive: a tenacious material.
3. Clinging to another object or surface; adhesive: tenacious lint.
4. Tending to retain; retentive: a tenacious memory.

[From Latin tenāx, tenāc-, holding fast, from tenēre, to hold; see ten- in Indo-European roots.]

te·na′cious·ly adv.
te·nac′i·ty (tə-năs′ĭ-tē), te·na′cious·ness n.

te•nac•i•ty

(təˈnæs ɪ ti)

n.
the quality or property of being tenacious.
syn: See perseverance.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tenacity - persistent determinationtenacity - persistent determination    
determination, purpose - the quality of being determined to do or achieve something; firmness of purpose; "his determination showed in his every movement"; "he is a man of purpose"

tenacity

tenacity

noun
Translations

tenacity

[tɪˈnæsɪtɪ] Ntenacidad f

tenacity

[tɪˈnæsəti] nténacité f

tenacity

nZähigkeit f, → Hartnäckigkeit f; (of character, person also)Beharrlichkeit f; the tenacity of his gripsein eiserner Griff; his tenacity of purposeseine zielstrebige Beharrlichkeit

tenacity

[tɪˈnæsɪtɪ] ntenacia
References in classic literature ?
From father to son, they clung to the ancestral house with singular tenacity of home attachment.
The new inhabitant -- who came himself from a foreign land, or whose father or grandfather came -- has little claim to be called a Salemite; he has no conception of the oyster -- like tenacity with which an old settler, over whom his third century is creeping, clings to the spot where his successive generations have been embedded.
Vanstone had more than the average share of a woman's tenacity and a woman's tact; and she took all the needful precautions, in those early days, which her husband's less ready capacity had not the art to devise -- precautions to which they were largely indebted for the preservation of their secret in later times.
It was in vain for Madame Defarge to struggle and to strike; Miss Pross, with the vigorous tenacity of love, always so much stronger than hate, clasped her tight, and even lifted her from the floor in the struggle that they had.
They were firm, not because of their basis, but because she held them with a tenacity inseparable from her mental action.
Even in the midst of the excitement and her terror Meriem found herself wondering at the tenacity of life which the hit man displayed.
From the glass windows in the drawing-room, I saw long seaweeds and gigantic fuci and varech, of which the open polar sea contains so many specimens, with their sharp polished filaments; they measured about 300 yards in length-- real cables, thicker than one's thumb; and, having great tenacity, they are often used as ropes for vessels.
The pilot, at first, did not seem to comprehend; he could scarcely realise so much determination and tenacity.
de Treville made a sign with his hand, and all retired except D'Artagnan, who did not forget that he had an audience, and with the tenacity of a Gascon remained in his place.
said Danglars, pretending to restrain Caderousse, who, with the tenacity of drunkards, leaned out of the arbor.
Raoul at the same time seized one of the young man's hands and placed it on the mane, which it grasped with the tenacity of a drowning man.
The public clung with really pathetic tenacity to what I believe were the direct traditions of the Great Exhibition of international vulgarity, traditions that were so appalling that the houses in which people lived were only fit for blind people to live in.