tenebrism


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tenebrism

(ˈtɛnəˌbrɪzəm)
n
(Art Movements) (sometimes capital) a school, style, or method of painting, adopted chiefly by 17th-century Spanish and Neapolitan painters, esp Caravaggio, characterized by large areas of dark colours, usually relieved with a shaft of light
ˈtenebrist n, adj
References in periodicals archive ?
Creating a correspondence with his technique, Ramesh employs tenebrism or intense contrasts of tonal values of light and shadow in painting the lamps, which enhances the works' conceptual valency.
Caravaggio perfected a heightened chiaroscuro, called tenebrism, which intersperses dark, murky spaces with areas of spectacular intensity.
Nude I and II, both 2008, have the same aura of remoteness and intimacy, and likewise use a kind of tenebrism, though this quality is most evident in Pigs, 2006.
Miranda is not trying to reproduce Tenebrism, but he did have to dominate the technique to be able to apply the concept--that of creating a sharp contrast between the lighted and unlit parts of the work.
By paying close attention to the nature of his successful commissions, and even reclaimed rejections, Pugliesi helps clarify the questions that may be easily overlooked, such as the meaning of his alternately interpreted famous or infamous use of tenebrism, which "underpins Caravaggio's reception as a great and moving religious artist" (33).
Isabel, who graduated from the Royal College of Art in 2002 with a Masters degree in Fine Art, says she uses the language of still life painting and the intense illumination of tenebrism - from the Italian word 'tenebroso' meaning 'murky' - which contrasts light with dark shadows.
At Jesus' preliminary hearing with Caiaphas, we are presented with a scene which is reminiscent of images by Rembrandt, no doubt as a direct result of the strong use of tenebrism and the exotic costumes of the Jewish High Priests.
Cranach's nimble intricate drawing, shunning all tricks of tenebrism and sfumato, captures something akin to gloating suffused in the Elector's heavy mien and tired eyes as, rubbing his thumbs together (a characteristic gesture seen in other portraits of him), he envisages the continuance of his line and the Protestant alliance which he hoped his son's marriage would bring about.
His paintings, using tenebrism to depict realistically the meeting of the divine and the human, of goodness and sinfulness, of light and darkness, exemplify for T.
The pervasive tenebrism, which seems as much photographic as painterly in character, gives the figures a rhetorical presence, as though they were declaiming their own importance.