tenement

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ten·e·ment

 (tĕn′ə-mənt)
n.
1. A building for human habitation, especially one that is rented to tenants.
2. A rundown, low-rental apartment building whose facilities and maintenance barely meet minimum standards.
3. Chiefly British An apartment or room leased to a tenant.
4. Law A property of a permanent nature that is possessed or owned, such as land or a building, along with the rights associated with such possession or ownership.

[Middle English, house, from Old French, from Medieval Latin tenēmentum, from Latin tenēre, to hold; see ten- in Indo-European roots.]

ten′e·men′tal (-mĕn′tl) adj.

tenement

(ˈtɛnəmənt)
n
1. (Human Geography) Also called: tenement building (now esp in Scotland) a large building divided into separate flats
2. a dwelling place or residence, esp one intended for rent
3. chiefly Brit a room or flat for rent
4. (Law) property law any form of permanent property, such as land, dwellings, offices, etc
[C14: from Medieval Latin tenementum, from Latin tenēre to hold]
tenemental, ˌteneˈmentary adj
ˈteneˌmented adj

ten•e•ment

(ˈtɛn ə mənt)

n.
1. Also called ten′ement house`. a run-down and often overcrowded apartment house, esp. in a poor section of a large city.
2. Law. property of a permanent or fixed nature, whether corporeal or incorporeal, as lands or rent.
3. Archaic. any abode or habitation.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Medieval Latin tenēmentum= Latin tenē(re) to hold + -mentum -ment]

tenement

- First meant "holding as a possession."
See also related terms for possession.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tenement - a run-down apartment house barely meeting minimal standardstenement - a run-down apartment house barely meeting minimal standards
apartment building, apartment house - a building that is divided into apartments
Translations

tenement

[ˈtenɪmənt]
A. Nvivienda f (Scot) (= flat) → piso m (Sp), departamento m (LAm)
B. CPD tenement block Nbloque m de pisos (Sp), bloque m de departamentos (LAm)
tenement house Ncasa f de vecinos, casa f de vecindad

tenement

[ˈtɛnəmənt] n
(also tenement building, tenement block) → immeuble m

tenement

n
(also tenement house)Mietshaus nt, → Mietskaserne f (pej)
(Jur) → Mietbesitz m; (= farm)Pachtbesitz m

tenement

[ˈtɛnɪmənt] ncasamento
References in classic literature ?
The view of ships lying moored in some of the older docks of London has always suggested to my mind the image of a flock of swans kept in the flooded backyard of grim tenement houses.
It is a troublesome rent to collect, but on the other hand there is no expenditure for repairs or sanitation, which are not considered necessary in tenement houses.
In rapid succession we passed through the fringe of fashionable London, hotel London, theatrical London, literary London, commercial London, and, finally, maritime London, till we came to a riverside city of a hundred thousand souls, where the tenement houses swelter and reek with the outcasts of Europe.
Under the gateway of the extremely ugly tenement house, which hides the Pavilion and the garden from the street, the wife of the porter was waiting with her arms akimbo.
The New Territories (NT) made news when old tenement houses and industrial buildings were repurposed into trendy shopping centers.
Writing of the area, which he describes as a territory near Withy Grove and Shude Hill, Engels describes how the tiny public squares which have formed around tenement houses were being rented out by 'porkraisers.
The building site comprises two 8-storey tenement houses and are vacant for the construction work.
The only way in which occupants of tenement houses can bathe is by using a tub of some kind, filled from the faucet in the kitchen or from that in the hall, or with water carried up from the yard.
The area, which was cleared about a half century ago when city officials tore down the tenement houses of nearly 2,000 families, has long been a point of contention between developers and affordable housing advocates.