tenure


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ten·ure

 (tĕn′yər, -yo͝or′)
n.
1.
a. The act, fact, manner, or condition of holding something in one's possession, as real estate or an office; occupation.
b. A period during which something is held.
2. The status of holding one's position on a permanent basis without periodic contract renewals: a teacher granted tenure on a faculty.

[Middle English, from Old French teneure, from tenir, to hold, from Latin tenēre, to hold; see ten- in Indo-European roots.]

ten·u′ri·al (-yo͝or′ē-əl) adj.
ten·u′ri·al·ly adv.

tenure

(ˈtɛnjʊə; ˈtɛnjə)
n
1. the possession or holding of an office or position
2. the length of time an office, position, etc, lasts; term
3. (Education) chiefly US and Canadian the improved security status of a person after having been in the employ of the same company or institution for a specified period
4. (Education) the right to permanent employment until retirement, esp for teachers, lecturers, etc
5. (Law) property law
a. the holding or occupying of property, esp realty, in return for services rendered, etc
b. the duration of such holding or occupation
[C15: from Old French, from Medieval Latin tenitūra, ultimately from Latin tenēre to hold]
tenˈurial adj
tenˈurially adv

ten•ure

(ˈtɛn yər)

n., v. -ured, -ur•ing. n.
1. the holding or possessing of anything: the tenure of an office.
2. the holding of property, esp. real property, of a superior in return for services to be rendered.
3. the period or term of holding something.
4. status granted to an employee indicating that the position or employment is permanent.
v.t.
5. to give tenure to.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French; Old French teneure < Vulgar Latin *tenitura=*tenit(us), for Latin tentus, past participle of tenēre to hold + -ura -ure]
ten•u′ri•al (-ˈyʊər i əl) adj.
ten•u′ri•al•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tenure - the term during which some position is held
term - a limited period of time; "a prison term"; "he left school before the end of term"
presidency, presidential term, administration - the tenure of a president; "things were quiet during the Eisenhower administration"
vice-presidency, vice-presidential term - the tenure of a vice president
episcopate - the term of office of a bishop
2.tenure - the right to hold property; part of an ancient hierarchical system of holding lands
legal right - a right based in law
copyhold - a medieval form of land tenure in England; a copyhold was a parcel of land granted to a peasant by the lord of the manor in return for agricultural services
freehold - tenure by which land is held in fee simple or for life
villeinage - tenure by which a villein held land
Verb1.tenure - give life-time employment to; "She was tenured after she published her book"
academe, academia - the academic world
elevate, kick upstairs, promote, upgrade, advance, raise - give a promotion to or assign to a higher position; "John was kicked upstairs when a replacement was hired"; "Women tend not to advance in the major law firms"; "I got promoted after many years of hard work"

tenure

noun
1. occupancy, holding, occupation, residence, tenancy, possession, proprietorship Lack of security of tenure meant that many became homeless.
2. term of office, term, incumbency, period in office, time his short tenure of the Labour leadership

tenure

noun
The holding of something, such as a position:
Translations
世襲保有保有期間終身

tenure

[ˈtenjʊəʳ]
A. N
1. [of land] → posesión f, tenencia f, ocupación f; [of office] → ocupación f, ejercicio m
2. (= guaranteed employment) → puesto m asegurado, permanencia f
teacher with tenureprofesor(a) m/f de número, profesor(a) m/f numerario/a
teacher without tenureprofesor(a) m/f no numerario/a
B. CPD tenure track position (US) → puesto m con posibilidad de obtener la permanencia

tenure

[ˈtɛnjər ˈtɛnjʊər] n
(= right of occupancy) [property, land] → bail m
(= period of office) période d'occupation d'un poste
(UNIVERSITY) (= right to permanent employment) → titularisation f
to have tenure → être titulaire

tenure

n
(= holding of office)Anstellung f; (= period of office)Amtszeit f
(of property) during her tenure of the house/farmwährend sie das Haus/die Farm innehatte; laws governing land tenureLandpachtgesetze pl

tenure

[ˈtɛnjʊəʳ] n (of land) → possesso; (of office) → incarico
to have tenure (guaranteed employment) → essere di ruolo
References in classic literature ?
Of their legal tenure there could be no question; but old Matthew Maule, it is to be feared, trode downward from his own age to a far later one, planting a heavy footstep, all the way, on the conscience of a Pyncheon.
For upwards of twenty years before this epoch, the independent position of the Collector had kept the Salem Custom-House out of the whirlpool of political vicissitude, which makes the tenure of office generally so fragile.
Notwithstanding my inability to settle to anything - which I hope arose out of the restless and incomplete tenure on which I held my means - I had a taste for reading, and read regularly so many hours a day.
The king would be the most absolute prince in the universe, if he could but prevail on a ministry to join with him; but these having their estates below on the continent, and considering that the office of a favourite has a very uncertain tenure, would never consent to the enslaving of their country.
There was a common head, chieftain, or sovereign, whose authority extended over the whole nation; and a number of subordinate vassals, or feudatories, who had large portions of land allotted to them, and numerous trains of INFERIOR vassals or retainers, who occupied and cultivated that land upon the tenure of fealty or obedience, to the persons of whom they held it.
According to all the constitutions, also, the tenure of the highest offices is extended to a definite period, and in many instances, both within the legislative and executive departments, to a period of years.
I remember well that the slaves, convinced of the precarious tenure on which they held their lives, passed whole days and nights in praying, crying, and groaning.
and even that sum I now held by a very precarious tenure.
The Leather-Stocking is much given to impeach the justice of the tenure by which the whites hold the country.
But we have seen apartments in the tenure of Americans of moderns [possibly "modest" or "moderate"] means, which, in negative merit at least, might vie with any of the or-molu'd cabinets of our friends across the water.
I owed it to her to let her know formally that of course I did not expect her to keep me on as a lodger, and also to show some interest in her own tenure, what she might have on her hands in the way of a lease.
He has made judges dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries.