tercet


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ter·cet

 (tûr′sĭt)
n.
1. A group of three lines of verse, often rhyming together or with another triplet.
2. Music See triplet.

[French, from Italian terzetto, from diminutive of terzo, third, from Latin tertius; see trei- in Indo-European roots.]

tercet

(ˈtɜːsɪt; tɜːˈsɛt)
n
(Poetry) a group of three lines of verse that rhyme together or are connected by rhyme with adjacent groups of three lines
[C16: from French, from Italian terzetto, diminutive of terzo third, from Latin tertius]

ter•cet

(ˈtɜr sɪt, tɜrˈsɛt)

n.
a group of three lines of verse rhyming together or connected by rhyme with the adjacent group or groups of three lines.
[1590–1600; < French < Italian terzetto < Latin tertius. See -et]

tercet

A group of three lines, often connected by rhyme.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tercet - the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and onetercet - the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and one
digit, figure - one of the elements that collectively form a system of numeration; "0 and 1 are digits"
Translations

tercet

[ˈtɜːsɪt] Nterceto m

tercet

n (Poet) → Terzine f; (Mus) → Triole f
References in periodicals archive ?
Here are the opening verses to "Stepping Crow," an example of Madrid's variation on the tercet form of the englyn stanza:
What does stand out, however, is that the poet chooses to use a different word, forza, in the very same tercet to describe the three subcategories of sinners who direct their "violence" against God, against the self and against one's neighbor: "'A Dio, a se, al prossimo si pone / far forza [.
Then follow two prayers (1582, D4v-D5r and 1687, C5r-C5v) with four stanzas of seven lines (a tercet and two couplets) each and the rhymes following the pattern a-b-a-b-b-c-c d-e-d-e-e-f-f etc.
In the final tercet he returns to the question of proximity implicit to the phrase "donna Mia.
The grammar of the closing tercet shifts from subordination and objection to a simple future tense, returning the form and tone of objection in "But .
In poetry, a tercet is a stanza in a poem made up of how many lines?
In translating Dante, Sayers had followed his terza rima scheme, in which the sound of the last word of the middle line of each tercet provides the rhyme for the first and last lines of the next.
His focus in these chapters fixes on Heaney's use and development of the tercet form out of the example given by Dante in The Divine Comedy.
His encyclopedic knowledge of Schubertian song is evident not only in the selection of these songs which range from Schubert's first Ossian Lieder--"Kolmas Klage" (D 217), "Das Madchen von Inistore" (D 281) and "Ossians Lied nach dem Falle Nathos" (D 278)--to dialogic songs--"Cronnan" (D 282), "Schilrich und Vinvela" (D 293), and the tercet, "Bardengesang" (D 147), for two tenors and bass--to epic scenes such as "Lodas Gespenst" (D 150) and "Die Nacht" (D 534).
31) The next tercet moves from Christian to classical centuries; "[m]y mind turned," Dante muses, still contemplating the turmoil of the previous canto, "to Aesop and his fables, most of all / the one de la rana e del topo," or the frog and the mouse (23.
In the final tercet of the sonnet the poet greets his guest: "Thank you
In the sestet, the poet places the social problem of Arcadia into a broader context of class difference and human isolation, developing these themes in two tercets: in the first tercet rhyme evokes an image of classes walking in a separate "groove" as they "move" through life; in the second tercet rhyme emphasizes our consequent incapacity to "understand" (109).